What is the opinion of Reddit about the
You Are Your Own Gym: The Bible of Bodyweight Exercises?

A total of 46 reviews of this product on Reddit.

1 point

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2nd Nov 2020

Round is a shape.

Seriously, though, my dojo is open in person and there are Zoom classes. That said, I’ve been threatening to get more into calisthenics/body weight exercises. I was training a few years back with a BJJ instructor who looked like a fitness model, and I asked if he worked out with kettle bells or something like that (they were very popular at the time). He said no, just body weight exercises. The obvious advantages are that you don’t need any gear, so you can do them anywhere. There are a ton of YouTube vids, and I also recommend a book called You Are Your Own Gym.

For cardio I’ve used TABATA and jumping rope in the past – I might start doing either or both of those again.

Edit: Oh, duh, I just re-read your post and saw where you said you don’t like bodyweight exercises. So ignore that.

1 point

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4th Dec 2017

I can recommend You Are Your Own Gym by Mark Lauren. (I’m not gonna say there’s ways to find the .pdf on the internet, but I’m not denying it either.) I’m a guy, but that’s not really important here. The book is a little jocky at times, but the exercises are explained really well and the entry level programmes are very doable for anyone. I worked with it the first time I got rid of my weight, and I dropped from roughly 120 kilos (265 pnd) down to 89 kilos (196 pd) as a 186/6’0” male. I exclusively used this book and Low-Carb Diet. Now, either way, the key point to losing weight is not the exercises, but that’s been mentioned here a lot. But workout doesn’t hurt. I mean, it technically does, but not for the means of losing weight. I picked back up Gym when I was at my lowest a couple weeks back and I’m feeling roughly a bazillion levels better.

1 point

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17th Oct 2016

I aim for a 40-30-30 rough ratio (carbs/fat/protein).

I found this book to be very helpful in learning about effective diet and exercise. It’s a program designed to be done entirely within the average home with no special equipment. Best results I’ve ever had with a workout program.

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10th Aug 2016

interesting that no one came up with you are your own gym. mark lauren is an ex-specops and trained a lot of fit people. in his book he explains what you need to eat and why, what happens with different food in your body tissue. he also has a nice explanation on how to train your body without any devices. it’s pretty damn good i think.

1 point

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30th Jun 2016

You need to lose weight and get in shape? Read this, thank me in 2 weeks: https://www.amazon.com/You-Are-Your-Own-Gym/dp/0345528581

No seriously, read it. Or don’t if you want to put minimum thought into it and skip to page 143, but you’ll learn some stuff by skimming through it. I’m miffed that my friend knew about this book for a while and didn’t tell me sooner ..

(Disclaimer: I’m not getting paid, have a stake in that book or any of that nonsense.)

1 point

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4th May 2016

What city.

Really the best things you can try making space for are probably planks, bridges, side bridges, pushups, squats (un-weighted of course since you lack space + equipment) and probably get yourself a used copy of http://www.amazon.com/You-Are-Your-Own-Gym/dp/0345528581/

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25th Jan 2016

Thanks 😀 I tend to let small clouds steal all the sunlight – I’m sure many of you know the feeling. Unfortunately I have to get work out of the way first – another 4 hours of it… And all the while it’s super sunny outside – I just was outside in the sun in just a t-shirt, oh them feels, first sun of the year!

I found the challenge looking for bodyweight workout books/dvds on amazon, I actually just tried to find in in English, and can’t! His other book is there http://www.amazon.com/You-Are-Your-Own-Gym/dp/0345528581/ – but not the challenge, which packs all of the bible into a strict 90 day program.

1 point

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9th Feb 2015

I’m doing Mark Lauren’s You are your own gym routines, his book is very well written, he explains nutrition extremely well, covered all the macros very well, and breaks down common myths and misconceptions about exercising. The books basically provides you with the skills and technique to work out anywhere. He is an elite physical trainer that some of the US special forces use (don’t let that be intimidating, the material is still very much relevant to average people). Anyway, the book provides you with enough workouts and modifications to last years of training. Very much worth the cost IMO.

1 point

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6th Nov 2014

I just bought this book on amazon for under ten dollars, body weight exercises you can do at home. It has a lot of info in it. I bought it because I am too self conscious to work out in public right now. Here’s a link.

http://www.amazon.com/You-Are-Your-Own-Gym/dp/0345528581

1 point

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8th Sep 2011

You can do equivalent body-weight workouts to keep yourself in shape.

I’ve been working out for a couple of years, 3-4 times a week, one of which is with a trainer. I recently switched to one of the programs in You Are Your Own Gym, and have been doing it for several weeks now. It’s pretty good. My sessions with my trainer are still regular sessions (i.e. not body-weight based), and I’m doing well on them still. Overall I’d say switching to body-weight exercises was an improvement, because I no longer have to go to the gym most days, so I work out 6 days a week now.

You’ll find a lot of exercises with a wide range of difficulty, accommodating different levels of strength. All exercises are compound too, and the routines are rather challenging (e.g. doing ladders where you rest for the duration it took you to do the last set before going into the next set; always keeps you on the brink of failure).

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8th Aug 2011

Bodyweight exercises are more about building balanced core strength than bulking, but you can certainly bulk up on it. Mark Lauren’s no stick figurine.

1 point

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3rd Jan 2011

I do variations of pull ups, dips, push ups, squats, planks and other body weight exercises and I’ve seen large gains in strength in a relatively short period of time. A set of stairs and the dumbbells make great calf exercises. Use the dumbbells and a cinder block to do one legged squats. There are shitloads of ways to change the exercises slightly to hit different muscles. Combine this with eating clean (veggies, grilled chicken, fish, eggs…) and you’ll be looking good in no time. I use this book and it seems pretty good.

1 point

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12th Jul 2011

If you try too much too soon I think you hit the danger of over training. At best that means less than efficient progress, at worst a serious injury. Your body only has so much capital to extend on exercising, building and repairing muscle tissue, etc. Working out all day, every day is just not going to be as effective as doing smaller workouts over a longer time span.

I think MEatRHIT gave great advice. Use this time to establish a reasonable routine you can stick with. Other than that, read a book.

Also, what are you trying to do when you say ‘push myself’? Lose weight? Build strength? Run marathons?

If it’s just basic fitness Jillian Michael’s has the 30 day shred program, which seems decent for overall fitness for a beginner. Personally, I just started strength training with body weight exercises (also female, 29.) I’m using this book, which has 10 week programs. Longer than you have plotted, but fitness isn’t quick in my experience and this is 30 min a day, 4-5 times a week. It’s bodyweight, easy to match to your custom fitness level and requires minimal/no additional equipment. I like it so far.

Whatever you do, best of luck.

1 point

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20th Jul 2021

This book called: Your body is your gym by mark lauren.

1 point

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12th Jan 2021
1 point

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14th Sep 2017

The best resource is You Are Your Own Gym by Mark Lauren. This Special Forces physical trainer provides programs and progression guides that helped me achieve one-arm, one-leg push ups and handstand push ups.

Years after doing only bodyweight exercises I wanted to lift heavy and found Strong Lifts 5×5 to be simple and effective. It consists of 5 barbell exercises (squats, bench press, overhead press, deadlifts and bent-over rows), 3 days a week, 3 exercises a day, 5×5. It is a great beginner to intermediate program as you will get stronger and learn the art of lifting with good form. I get a kick out of challenging myself to lift heavier and training the good old fashioned way. I have since supplemented this program with bodyweight exercises like chin ups, pull ups, push ups and dips for greater arm development.

1 point

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14th Sep 2017

The best resource is You Are Your Own Gym by Mark Lauren. This Special Forces physical trainer provides programs and progression guides that helped me achieve one-arm, one-leg push ups and handstand push ups.

Years after doing only bodyweight exercises I wanted to lift heavy and found Strong Lifts 5×5 to be simple and effective. It consists of 5 barbell exercises (squats, bench press, overhead press, deadlifts and bent-over rows), 3 days a week, 3 exercises a day, 5×5. It is a great beginner to intermediate program as you will get stronger and learn the art of lifting with good form. I get a kick out of challenging myself to lift heavier and training the good old fashioned way. I have since supplemented this program with bodyweight exercises like chin ups, pull ups, push ups and dips for greater arm development.

1 point

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2nd Mar 2017

If you (or anyone else reading this) would rather do bodyweight exercises than go to the gym, You Are Your Own Gym (iOS | Android) is a great app that walks you through this. It also has a companion book.

1 point

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12th Aug 2016

The “You Are Your Own Gym” app has been pretty fantastic for me. It exposes you to a range of exercises, rather than becoming overly focused on one narrow area. An adjustable pullup bar is useful, but otherwise no equipment is needed.

Book,
App

1 point

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22nd Jul 2016

Frankly you’d probably be better off with something like this https://www.amazon.com/You-Are-Your-Own-Gym/dp/0345528581

also have a look at these guys, have great programs available https://gmb.io/

1 point

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22nd Jun 2016

There is a book called “Your body is your gym” https://www.amazon.com/You-Are-Your-Own-Gym/dp/0345528581 It will keep you occupied toll you want weights. You can do all of these in your home with no or minimal equipment. Buy it. Do it.

1 point

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11th May 2016

I’m pretty sure this is what you’re looking for, but it requires some critical thinking in choosing exercises from it http://www.amazon.com/You-Are-Your-Own-Gym/dp/0345528581/

1 point

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27th May 2016

If he wants only body weight routine to be his focus yes he can become very strong, I suggest this book to start http://www.amazon.com/You-Are-Your-Own-Gym/dp/0345528581

1 point

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19th May 2016

http://www.amazon.com/You-Are-Your-Own-Gym/dp/0345528581
best thing that ever happend to me 😀

1 point

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15th Mar 2016

Check out the book You are your own gym. It goes into detail about various exercises you can do just about anywhere and how to scale them up or down based on your current fitness level.

1 point

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6th Feb 2016

Agreed. I’d also like to add that if you are able to get a hold of this book, it is very informative as well…

http://www.amazon.com/You-Are-Your-Own-Gym/dp/0345528581

If you are broke, I know that my local library has it. Yours might too.

1 point

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13th Dec 2015
  1. Gold’s Gym (better equipped anyhow)

  2. Ward gym – most of them don’t care at all, or at worst will ask that you cover up on the floor.

  3. Use the gym that you were born with.

1 point

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29th Sep 2015

You are your own gym from Mark Lauren is a good book to read on the matter.

1 point

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15th Jul 2015

Hola. Recognizing that not everyone here wants to lose weight, I think I can contribute to this.

So, to your first question, exercises that can be done with little equipment, walking, running and calisthenics are the first things that come to mind. I LOVE this book. You Are Your Own Gym: The Bible of Bodyweight Exercises https://www.amazon.com/dp/0345528581/ref=cm_sw_r_awd_qJMPvbSMFPPPV

As for motivation, I can tell you a bit about myself. 3 years ago I decided I’d had enough of being morbidly obese and decided to start making it work. I started lifting weights and biking, I began lifting weights and doing yoga (adding things VERY slowly over months too I could consistently do them multiple times a week). At this point, 60 lbs lighter, I’m a distance runner, triathlete and becoming a fitness instructor. That’s where I ended up but it wasn’t my goal. Here are the things that helped.

  1. I decided to change my life, not set a pound goal. So I found ways to move more that I like. And knowing it was a lifetime commitment, after I got to that point, has made me patient with slow body changes.

  2. I found a time of day to exercise (morning, before coffee), that I could find time in and then gave myself a reward after (coffee).

  3. I learned to be nice to myself. When I didn’t work out, or ate more than I was allotted, I acknowledged it and made a different choice the next day. I realized that doing push-ups on my knee was a hell of a workout, because 2/3 of my body weight is substantial!

  4. I set small goals and took things one day at a time.

  5. The circumstances in my life made it something I felt I needed to be permanent. I had tried dozens of times before and it hadn’t stuck. I was stubborn this time and instead of just doing what others told me kept trying stuff til I found something that worked for me.

  6. I looked honestly at my diet and tracked it. I made it a point to eat good QUALITY food but not obsess if I didn’t stick to it 100%, nor did I swear off anything I LOVE. I just limited it.

I hope that helps, and wasn’t too long. Good luck!

1 point

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2nd Jun 2015

There’s You Are Your Own Gym, which starts off nice and easy, and then gets as horrible as you want it to, and there is a nice set of apps and videos that are available to go with it.

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23rd Apr 2015
1 point

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19th Sep 2011

Depends on your fitness level. If sedentary and just starting out, the Hacker’s Diet workout is far better than nothing, needs no equipment and takes maybe 10 minutes.

Otherwise, you might want to get a copy of You Are Your Own Gym. They’re all bodyweight exercises with routines designed to be done at home in 20-30 minutes.

1 point

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10th Mar 2011
1 point

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17th Oct 2011

Read this book! Doesn’t address the smoking issue, but he outlines how you can get fit without a gym membership.

I’m a former smoker, and I’m still shit at running, because it hurts mah knees. I love biking though, and martial arts are a really fun way to get the heart rate up that I’ve started recenly. I’ve noticed that since quitting smoking, I don’t feel like I constantly have a cold, and I take the stairs whenever possible because it feels good to push my body to limits that I wouldn’t have given a shit about before. I lift weights so I can get big. One day I’ll work on my running abilities so I can do a Spartan Race.

Here’s my advice. You’re going to quit when you realize that you don’t need to smoke, and that smoking is stupid and a waste of money. You’re going to quit when you want to quit. No one is going to be able to convince you to quit before you’re ready. If you want to get fit, just START and don’t STOP, ever. You can do anything you want to do. You just have to, you know….do it. Run down the block and back, do pushups when you wake up and before you go to bed, do bodyweight exercises until you can do all of these, bike to work, take the stairs, join a gym with the money you would have used to fuel your early death, whatever. Just do something. Get moving. The longer you wait the more discouraged you’ll be.

Now go do 10 push-ups.

😀

1 point

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14th May 2011

Please, is this book a good one?

1 point

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13th Aug 2011

I gave you a shitty iphone link last time, here’s a better one:
http://www.amazon.com/You-Are-Your-Own-Gym/dp/0345528581

I couldn’t really type out a decent reply for obvious reasons.

Anyway, you’re coaches are simply wrong. From my own personal experience, you can bulk up on bodyweight excercises. But you also get a lot more functional fitness as well.

The gym is nice and good, but it works the muscles in isolation and with moves you’d hardly do outside the gym unlike compound joint exercise (bodyweight). If you simply want to bulk up, do what the body builders do as that is the fastest route. But if you want functional fitness, do what the gymnasts do.

BTW, bodybuilders aren’t the strongest people out there. There’s different kinds of strength, but lets define it as lifting. If you look at powerlifters, they don’t tend to have a bodybuilder’s body (the serious ones also tend to have a shit-ton of back and knee problems too). That’s because bodybuilders, while strong, are more after an aesthetic look.

BTW, once I get past “Chief Class” in Mark’s book, I’m moving on to this program, which is also minimalist equipment, just more advanced:
http://gymnasticbodies.com/

But You Are Your Own Gym is virtually a prerequisite and will be good enough for 95% people out there. We’re talking handstand exercises by the end of it. And there’s little equipment although you may have to use furniture or be creative. You could do it in a hotel room most likely.

I generally don’t recommend cardio (look up sprinters vs marathon runners in google images), but I do recommend looking into jump roping and Buddy Lee’s book Jump Rope Training. Boxers use the rope and they are built…

Good luck.

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31st Jan 2011

Do Body Weight Excercises. You can take them anywhere, and they will build muscle.

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4th Aug 2011

Link. You need the http:// for it to work.

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11th Apr 2013

Dude, forget the gym. Find your own beast mode!
APP:
https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/bodyweight-training-you-are/id416981420?mt=8
BOOK:
http://www.amazon.com/You-Are-Your-Own-Gym/dp/0345528581

Personally I prefer the app costs less than $3 and has all plans and videos.

Good luck!

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1st Aug 2011

<ahem>

Edit: Weight loss is accomplished in the kitchen, fitness and strength in the gym/field.