What is the opinion of Reddit about the
Vitamin D3 with K2 Liquid Drops, All Natural, Non GMO, 1208IU D3 and 25mcg K2 (MK7) Per Serving, Support Your Bones, Immune System and Energy Levels, with or Without Peppermint Oil…?

A total of 2 reviews of this product on Reddit.

1 point

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16th Jan 2022

50,000 IU for someone who tests positive for the first few days then taper down to about 5,000 to 10,000 IU.

You’re right about hypercalcemia but that only happens if you take high doses for too long and/or skip K2.

I take D3 in drop form which already includes K2. I recommend this to a lot of people.

https://www.amazon.com/Vitamin-Natural-Serving-Strengthen-Peppermint/dp/B014K3H73A/ref=mp_s_a_1_4?crid=1X84FS0UJZCMW&keywords=vitamin+d3+k2+drops&qid=1642348076&sprefix=vitamin+d3+k2+drops%2Caps%2C140&sr=8-4

1 point

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28th Oct 2016

Haha I think if you hadn’t revealed your profession I could’ve guessed you were a professor. This comment is probably the most polite, thorough, and vocally appreciative of intellectual curiosity (I think the million dollar phrase was “lifelong learning”) I’ve seen on reddit. Congrats, you’ve succeeded in making me want to respond further 🙂

First of all, examine is a fantastic resource and the first place you should look when talking about supplements. Most important papers about any supp will be linked. Some other tips: add “nih” to your search to get papers indexed by the NIH; most are. Or just use Google Scholar to get a larger but often less relevant body of research.

Synephrine: just using Google Scholar, I found Seville (sour) Orange Juice: Synephrine Content and iovascular Effects in Normotensive Adults, which indicates safety. But there’s also [Ischemic Stroke Associated With Use of an Ephedra-Free Dietary Supplement Containing Synephrine](http://www.mayoclinicproceedings.org/article/S0025-6196(11\)63207-2/abstract). If I were well-versed in neuroscience, I could chew through Activities of octopamine and synephrine stereoisomers on alpha-adrenoceptors, to see if anything contraindicates the any other part of your stack. The examine page links these studies and more, along with a better overview than I could ever provide! I’d say (and please take this with a grain of salt, I didn’t do much reading at all) maybe keep it if you’re trying to lose weight, and cut it otherwise. If you’re not noticing any effects, why bother?

For Na-R-ALA, I’m trusting /u/misteryouaresodumb (amateur(?) physiologist and owner of some noot sites) when he emphatically recommends it over any alternative form. I’m sure he’s got some studies.

>D3 and K2, so if you know of their efficacy in respect to the rest of my mix”

–generally vitamins and minerals have few interactions that aren’t beneficial/expected for the health of the organism (besides some competing for uptake, like iron/zinc/magnesium/calcium–which is only relevant at combined doses in excess of 800mg). Take them if you need them. For D, the gist is that most people don’t get enough sun in the winter. (Sidenote on vitamins: in case you don’t know, the US RDA of many is way off. This is the same government who produced the health pyramid pushing animal products and 6 servings of grain per day, so ignore their often decades-old numbers and look for new research.) Most people should take 1-5k IU of D3 per day if they don’t have regular (few hours per week), strong (sun significantly above the horizon) sun exposure. You can get your D levels measured in a blood test. My partner’s was low (29ng) and was brought up to normal levels by taking a couple megadoses (50kIU) followed by daily 5k doses. My favorite type is this because it is high dosed, easy to take liquid, and has K2.

Magnesium: 2 seconds of googling (I’m not trying to be passive aggressive here–searching and synthesizing large amounts of information is one of my strongest talents–but I’m sure you can do it too!) gave me the multifaceted and widespread pathology of magnesium deficiency. Hanging out in /r/stackadvice / /r/supplements / /r/nootropics you’ll find nearly everyone takes magnesium. This is the best; take my word for it or come to the same conclusion yourself.

Other vitamins: take iron if blood tests indicate you’re low (and avoid if you’re in the normal range). Consider zinc. Consider a B complex, or at least B12. I take all these and iodine, because I’m vegan. If you’re totally committed to health (or committed to ethical behavior) I’d recommend cutting all animal products.

Uridine: this is the definitive post. This stack is proven enough that a formulation is being marketed towards those at risk for dementia. Funny enough, the nutrients in it are rather shit–less bioavailable forms of nearly everything: DL-alpha-tocopheryl acetate as the vitamin E source, magnesium hydroxide, folic acid, and choline chloride as the choline source?? Among many others. I really wish someone more informed than I would comment on this, because it seems absurd. Anyways, I’d consider experiment with uridine as the next logical nootropic step.

Genetic testing: I used 23 and me. About safety, yeah they may sell your information one day to Google/the government/big pharma. I think it’s concerning; I’m about as radically against corporations and government (read: hierarchy and fascism) as they come, but I think the benefits outweigh the potential future risk. I’m still trying to dissect all the phenotypes and make charts of my metabolic pathways and whatnot, but I did learn of a rather common mutation that effects my methylation cycle. It means I have to take methylcobalamin (form of B12) and avoid foods enriched with folic acid (AKA pteroylglutamic acid–the better form is pteroylglutamate AKA folate). (Anecdote time: right before I got my results back, I took a B12 pill containing a good deal of folic acid and experienced apathy and lethargy for a good 8 hours).

Overall stack: negative effects can all be found on the examine pages. Additionally I might be careful about chronic use of neurotransmitter agonists, not that your list has any. This discusses the possibility of down-regulation due to GABA agonists (such as Kava, Ashwaghanda, phenibut). Besides the racetams (haven’t looked too much into them) I really don’t think there’s anything at all concerning in your stack. Interactions can be found on examine under “nutrient-nutrient” interactions, but everything on your list is very tame and most likely totally beneficial.

More advice: maybe experiment with other racetams if you haven’t already.

I take many of the supps you do, plus:

  • I’m a fan of maca for energy/libido.

  • I use creatine for cognitive and muscle building effects.

  • L-citrulline as a preworkout/sexual supplement (NO booster).

  • I am very caffeine sensitive, so L-Theanine is wonderful for reducing jitters.

  • Sub 1mg doses of melatonin I sometimes use for sleep. If I really need to sleep now, GHB is extremely effective and safe.

Then I mix it up with stimulants, cannabis, phenibut, and a good LSD experience every now and again. Recreational drugs yes, but the line between them and supplements is determined only by potency and the frequency of use which is considered smart/safe.

Please, if you have any other questions about my experiences or anything else, let me know! I’m more than happy to wax poetic about anything. Thanks for the discussion