What is the opinion of Reddit about the
Strength Training Anatomy, 3rd Edition?

A total of 42 reviews of this product on Reddit.

21 points

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12th Apr 2017

Seconded. While absolutely not the ultimate compendium of exercises it does label muscle groups with a good anatomical drawing and what exercises works what, does give suggestions on alternative grips, cautionary warnings. It is a very good book.

amazon linky

source: I own a copy

1 point

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27th Jan 2022

I think I know what you mean, this stuff is deceptive. Someone can actually be big and strong and not look very big depending on their body type.

One thing to look at is the ratios of the forearm to the bicep, the forearm to the wrist, and the wrist to the shoulder. The shoulder joint is relatively large and complex but isn’t much larger than Rand’s wrist. Then the thickest part of his forearm appears to be larger than his bicep/triceps. Both of them being melee fighters, they’ll absolutely have well-developed forearm muscles, more than average, but that also propagates up through their arm to the shoulder joint.

Although not technically a book on anatomy, I find the illustrations in this book to be a good reference for how different muscle groups relate wrt their functional behaviors, drawn through a variety of body types and angles.

1 point

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3rd Jan 2022

This book is extremely useful for targeting specific muscle groups. From what I understand, you wanna target thighs, glutes, and abdomen. Though you may be better off with endurance training… Do cardio!

1 point

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21st Dec 2021

You look like you’re headed in the right direction. I recommend this book…

Strength Training Anatomy, 3rd Edition https://www.amazon.com/dp/0736092269/ref=cm_sw_r_apan_glt_fabc_E3FRJWZ3TF1H30R89KR6

Target your back, hips, thighs, gluten.

Keep up the great work!

1 point

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28th Aug 2018

Physics. This strength training and anatomy book covers it in simple terms and adds variations for different bodies. It’s helped me a lot and I go back an review things all the time. Also, the illustrations are gold.

Strength Training Anatomy, 3rd Edition https://www.amazon.com/dp/0736092269/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_S.wHBbWZXCRWP

I never really understood why my deadlift was so fanfuckingtastic and my squat and bench suffered so dramatically. It’s my morphology. I’ve learned to train for my body type and I’m still finding little things and variations that help along the way.

We are not all created equal.

1 point

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30th Jan 2018

Flat bench line the bar up with your nipple.

Incline bench more closer to the neck as In picture to the right.

Elbow variants just focus on different muscles more.

Elbows pulled in moves focus away from front delt

I recommend this book – https://www.amazon.co.uk/Strength-Training-Anatomy-Sports/dp/0736092269

Goes into great detail on different exercises and variation of exercise dependant on body type etc too

1 point

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25th Feb 2017

Get yourself Frederic Delavier’s Strength Training Anatomy, so you can visualise the different muscles and how they work.

Listen to your body and learn how to FEEL those separate muscles under tension. Put on some tunes that motivate you, but help you focus, and find a quiet part of the gym to work in.

Also, try them at home with body weight first. Set up your phone and film yourself, or work in front of the mirror to check form. Build your confidence and learn how the correct form feels, then if you feel awkward in the gym you’ll stand a chance of getting it right even if you’re panicking about the world staring at and critiquing you.

Also: I know anxiety makes it challenging, but keep a smile on your face in the gym and some nice guys/girls will probably strike up a conversation and be happy to offer you pointers.

If that’s too much, try getting in with a good PT (even for half an hour a week) which will make you feel comfortable and confident.
Look for the PT’s with clients that are working hard but look happy to be doing so!

You’ve got this, you just need to keep pushing through and find your confidence with it. Make the gym the one place your anxiety doesn’t rule your life.

Feel free to PM me if you ever want advice! 🙂

https://www.amazon.com/Strength-Training-Anatomy-Frederic-Delavier/dp/0736092269/ref=la_B001H6NZGW_1_1/158-3985945-0181711?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1488033303&sr=1-1

1 point

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31st Jan 2017

May I recommend a book? I have the first edition of Frederic Delavier’s Strength Training Anatomy. It is a great resource for identifying what muscles are where, and what muscles exercises actually work.

1 point

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14th Jul 2016

Right now my goal is very simple and a bit vague: I just want to look and feel more athletic. My current focus is improving the appearance of my butt, thighs, and shoulders. I am still struggling to get out of ‘skinny fat’ phase. This is why I’m doing cardio on Tuesdays and Thursdays–I’m currently trying to burn off the fat and I believe I’m still in the early phase in which it’s possible to burn fat and build muscle simultaneously (it’s worked thus far), but that phase will end eventually.

I put this program together myself. I started with Stronglifts, moved onto Ice Cream Fitness, then continued to build onto that. I basically just paid attention to the changes in my structure and added or subtracted exercises when I felt that I needed to work on X (for example, I stopped bicep curls, because my biceps were out of control compared to everything else and I’m not into having huge biceps. I’ve recently added side and front raises to pump up my deltoids). I basically just study up on fitness, examine and re-examine my Strength Training Anatomy book, and make adjustments accordingly.

Also, my workouts must be one hour and 20 minutes or less because the gym opens at 7 a.m. and that’s how much time I have to workout before I have to go to work. I would be doing a serious full-body workout 3 days a week if I could spend 2 hours at the gym but sadly it isn’t possible.

I’d love it if you shared your workout with me.

1 point

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13th Apr 2016

I totally agree with H-bizzle below and I would also recommend this book: Strength Training Anatomy by Frederic Delavier http://www.amazon.com/Strength-Training-Anatomy-Frederic-Delavier/dp/0736092269/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1460524829&sr=8-1&keywords=strength+training+anatomy – This book has a ton of information in regards to muscles and how to train them right. Hope this helps

1 point

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29th Feb 2016

Three things. First off your going way too fast, it’s not about speed it’s about control. Treat a 45lbs squat the same as you would on a 225lbs squat, same speed, form, and control every single time regardless of weight. Secondly your knees are going further than your toes, I guarantee that’s what is causing your knee pain. Your toes should always be ahead of your knees or the same at most. Also third whoever told you that your butt needs to touch the floor is crazy. The book in the link is a very useful guide and tool I still use after 10 years. Of course I bought the second edition.

Side question, are you doing leg extensions? The only reason why I ask is because they have one of the highest mechanical loads in terms of psi on the knee. This is common for people to do these and have knee problems.

http://www.amazon.com/Strength-Training-Anatomy-3rd-Edition/dp/0736092269

1 point

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23rd Dec 2015

A bit more dense, but this book covers multiple exercises for each muscle group, complete with detailed anatomical drawings showing the activated muscles and the surrounding anatomy: http://www.amazon.com/Strength-Training-Anatomy-3rd-Edition/dp/0736092269

I paid $20 for it brand new and the value/dollar ratio is awesome.

1 point

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17th Jun 2015

Judging by your responses, you may be interested in Strength Training Anatomy.

It has a ton of exercises in, showing you the muscles being worked with some detailed illustrations. t gives details on how to perform each exercise, and usually includes variations (different grips, incline/decline, etc.)

There are also a few sections on stretching, and injuries (tears, rotator cuff problems, back pain), all relating to strength training.

If you’re keen on learning more about things like that, it’s a great book.

ExRx.net is also a great resource. It lists the muscles used for each exercise and explains how variations affect which muscles are targeted, but it doesn’t combine the exercises with the details of the muscles in the same way as the book (imo).

1 point

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2nd Jun 2015

The book Strength Training Anatomy really helped me out as a reference. Basically, I look at the exercises and see if I’m not feeling an exercise in the muscles I’m supposed to be feeling it in, then I’m probably doing it wrong

1 point

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5th Apr 2015

It’s fallen out of favor in the last 10 years, but the Body For Life program might be just what you’re looking for. It’ll give you a good solid foundation on basic nutrition and teach you how to manage sets of progressive increased weight. Some of the information is a little dated and bro-sciencey, but overall routine and nutrition is sound. I HIGHLY RECCOMEND "Strength Training Anatomy" to new gym rats

1 point

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13th Mar 2015

Strength training anatomy is a lot like the “Back/Triceps 101” posts that are popular lately. I have it and it goes through various accessory exercises all broken up in to sections based on body parts. I’d definitely recommend it :
http://www.amazon.com/Strength-Training-Anatomy-3rd-Edition/dp/0736092269

1 point

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10th Jan 2015

Let me ask you this–do you need a trainer? Do you want a trainer? Or are you just a little uncomfortable at the idea of going it on your own (i.e., fear)? Because it sounds to me like you’re just a bit nervous but ultimately know what to do. In which case, I say, toss the trainer idea and trust yourself. You can do this without any annoying/sexist dude bruhs guilting you while they check your form, and you can do it while saving $1300 (take yourself on a nice vacation to a spa town in 12 weeks instead).

I can’t remember where I picked this up, but someone told me once that women tend to have good form in the weight room because they’re more deliberate lifters. They’re not just chasing high numbers and sacrificing their posture to do it. Also, with the difference in anatomy (Q-angles of knees, width of pelvis, etc.), I’ve had some men give me really questionable advice about form–like squatting with my knees closer together than was comfortable and having them insist that my discomfort/pain was normal. Like, no. But like in all things, the “default” of training advice tends to be for men, with “specialized” advice given for women’s SPECIAL knees, so you can’t really count on an everyman at the gym to know those things.

This is one of my favorite books: http://www.amazon.com/Strength-Training-Anatomy-3rd-Edition/dp/0736092269

It goes into detail about the muscles used in every exercise and variations, details about tendons and how the length of your femur will affect the leverage you get in a squat. There are notes for female anatomy and cautions/tips for form on pretty much every exercise you can think of.

1 point

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4th Aug 2011

I agree with the other posters here, everyone on target. Strength Training Anatomy is a great book that shows you what muscles are worked for a variety of exercises. It’s great to keep in the gym bag.

3 points

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25th May 2021

If you want to really dig into the science of it, this book was at the top of everyone’s list: https://www.amazon.com/Strength-Training-Anatomy-Frederic-Delavier/dp/0736092269

2 points

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10th Jan 2021

r/bodybuilding

Cable rope tricep overhead extension and dual dumbell overhead tri extension are my two favorites. The mind+muscle connection is your friend here.

Also, this is my go-to reference

1 point

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20th Dec 2021
1 point

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13th Sep 2021

Strength Training Anatomy by Frederic Delavier

However, do you have the print or Kindle version of SS? I thought there were sufficient pictures in the print version but perhaps you have the other

1 point

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27th May 2021

I poked around on Amazon (which I guess I coulda done before posting…) and found three books that I just pulled the trigger on, ’cause why not. All by Frederic Delavier:

Based on the previews, they kinda seem to be what I was describing, i.e. precise, anatomical approaches to fitness. I’ll let you know!

1 point

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1st Mar 2019

Failing to plan is planning to fail.

For less then $20, go to Amazon, pick up a copy of Strength Training Anatomy. It shows you what exercies work which muscle groups. It shows correct form. Go through it, get familiar with the exercises and how they should be done, and what muscle groups each exercise works, and then come up with a plan. There’s literally thousand of videos on YouTube for people beginning weight training.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U0bhE67HuDY

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dLN8UPYdcHc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zxHP1fSp0Z4

Come up with a workout plan: On chest, delts and triceps day, do these exercises; on back, biceps, and forearms day, do these exercises; on leg day do these exercise…

1 point

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13th Mar 2018
1 point

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1st Feb 2018
1 point

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22nd Aug 2017

I LOVE this book. It’s not necessarily a program, but it’ll be a valuable resource regardless of what program he decides to do.

https://www.amazon.com/Strength-Training-Anatomy-Frederic-Delavier/dp/0736092269

1 point

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13th Jun 2017

Strength training anatomy for learning how exercises strengthen certain parts, Bigger, Leaner, Stronger for basics on training for aesthetics and strength, and Burn the Fat, Feed the Muscle for good diet advice.

1 point

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12th Apr 2017

I always loved this book. Along with the second volume.

Strength Training Anatomy, 3rd Edition https://www.amazon.com/dp/0736092269/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_joI7ybS2GC7TG

1 point

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22nd Dec 2016

Cable curls are good for biceps brachii isolation. However, I would also recommend some hammer curls to target the brachialis for more balanced development. Source: Strength Training Anatomy.

1 point

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7th Nov 2016

would you say this one is better than Strength Training Anatomy?

https://www.amazon.com/Strength-Training-Anatomy-Frederic-Delavier/dp/0736092269

1 point

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2nd Jul 2016

It tells you, but it doesn’t visually highlight the muscles worked in the videos/animations it provides.

You might try a Google image search and/or a YouTube search using the name of the exercise along with the search terms “muscles worked” or “anatomy” …for example: squat muscles worked or deadlift anatomy.

There’s also a popular booked called “Strength Training Anatomy” known for its detailed illustrations of the muscles being worked in specific exercises.

1 point

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27th Jan 2016

I’ll donate a prize. Maybe this book one for a men’s group and women’s version of the book for a women’s group.

1 point

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8th Dec 2015

Go pick up Strength Training Anatomy ( http://www.amazon.ca/Strength-Training-Anatomy-3rd-Frederic-Delavier/dp/0736092269 )

Worth looking at!

1 point

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2nd Nov 2015

All personal opinions:

Starting strength is a good program to start. You can do all the movements with dumbbell alternative moves. In addition to those lifts, you can add bicep, tricep and ab workouts, but these are smaller muscles. IMO beginners should focus on leg, chest, shoulder and back first.

Also forms over weights. If you feel overwhelmed by too many videos, check out this book below.
http://www.amazon.com/Strength-Training-Anatomy-3rd-Edition/dp/0736092269

You can also try skipping the rest days. If you are still in your 20s, and not lifting very heavy weights, maybe workout 6 or 7 days a week instead of resting every other day is better. When I first started lifting (alone) I wasn’t working out hard enough. I didn’t realize that till I met other lifters.

Personally I got much better results using a barbell for squat and deadlift than with dumbbells. Therefore I’d still recommend you to buy a exercise ball and a barbell bar. The ball acts like a bench for you (if you can afford a bench buy one). When you use the ball, make sure you load the weights correctly (search “exercise ball dumbbell press” on youtube). For the bar, make sure it matches your dumbbell plates. With the weights you are working with right now, you shouldn’t need a barbell rack yet.

Back story: I don’t have a gym membership either. I have been working out in my apartment for about 6 months. Dumbbell sets were all I have for the first 3 months, so I used to be in a similar situation like you. My current program is:

Monday

Chest: Press, Fly; Back: Bent over row, Shrug

Tuesday (basically a rest day, sometimes I do random workouts, like planks, calf raise etc.)

Bicep: curl with different grips; tricep: skullcrusher, seated extension

Wednesday

Delt/Lat: Overhead press, Lateral raise, Lateral pulldown (with resist band); Ab: different crunch supersets, plank

Thursday – Saturday: repeat

Sunday (would love to have more leg days, but only once a week because of DOMS)

Lunge, Squat, Deadlift

1 point

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3rd Sep 2015

Step 1 is get in the gym. You already did that, you are already winning the battle, congratulations! Seriously, you have already taken the biggest step.

What do you do for exercise? IT DOESN’T MATTER! Do whatever you like, no one said you have to be in a gym to get exercise. I like weight lifting primarily along with some cardio, so for me the gym makes sense. I’ve been reading study, after study that points to strength training as being the most effective thing to counter insulin resistance (if you’re overweight, you’ve got it), at least early on. So if you like the idea of getting stronger, start lifting. If you don’t know what you’re doing get Strength Training Anatomy or just about any introductory book on lifting with examples and routines.

You don’t have to do much at the outset, just go light, focus on perfecting your form, and do 1 lift per muscle group and do either a circuit (all in one day) or a 2-day split (divide the groups between 2 days). You will want to start out with 2-3 sets of 10 per lift. Then after about a month or two when you feel comfortable with your form up it to 2 lifts per muscle group, with a 3-day split and start lifting heavier for 3 sets of 5. This will build strength, and you will see fast results early on (I’m talking months here, don’t expect miracles in days). Do light cardio (walk for 30 min or so, keep your heart rate above 110 BPM) throughout this process.

Once your strength gains start to slow a bit and you stop feeling drained by the walking, kick the cardio up a notch. Boost it to 45 minutes, aim to keep your heart rate above 125. Get comfortable there after a few months? Boost it to 60 minutes and get that heart rate over 140. This is the point where you will need that cardio to peel off the pounds. If you get very serious about strength training you’ll want to move into a 5×5 workout, but that’s further down the road.

Set a schedule for the gym. Days of the week and times. Don’t let anyone or anything interfere with it. This way you aren’t reliant on will-power to get to the gym, it’s part of your daily routine. Whether or not you feel like going doesn’t matter.

Be optimistic, but stay realistic. Reality is not that you’re an ugly human being. Reality is that you are a person. A person who happens to be struggling with depression and obesity. If you’re anything like me, you’re tougher on yourself than anyone else on the planet. If your worst enemy doesnt even treat you that badly, why do it to yourself? Go easy on yourself, I know where you’re at. When my brain starts down the “you’re worthless, you suck, why bother” path, I have to remind myself to tell it to shut the fuck up, that what I’m doing is a life-changing undertaking worthy of my own respect and I deserve to feel good about what I’m doing and I even get to feel good about myself.

So I don’t win every struggle, so what? I’m getting better at it every month, every week, every day. I’m developing strategies for dealing with cravings and proactively adjusting my meal size and frequency to counter binge eating.

I hope you’re feeling a bit better about getting into the gym at this point, so let me just give you a quick outline for success that is working for me:

  1. Eat often. Every 2-3 hours you should be having a small meal, or at the very least a snack. This helps keep your blood sugar levels even throughout the day. The larger the spikes you experience, the more likely you are to become ravenous and binge eat.

  2. Drink often. The throat being parched and the mouth being dry are signs of dehydration, they aren’t the only signs you need water. The body cannot tell the difference between thirst and hunger, and sends the same signal for both. Try drinking a glass of water before you start eating when you suddenly feel hungry. That “I’m hungry 30 minutes after eating Chinese food” thing? It’s usually pretty salty so what people experience is a need for water (which is also needed for digestion to compound the “hungry” sensation).

  3. Eat volume. If you feel full more of the time, you will binge eat less. To do this while maintaining a calorie deficit means eating low-calorie foods. That generally means cutting fats and carbs out as much as possible, because they are incredibly calorie dense. Eat more fruits, veggies, and lean meat. 1 peach is around 40-60 calories. Think you can eat 30-40 peaches in a day to hit the 2000 calorie mark? I don’t think I could. Examples of low calorie foods are: Oatmeal (the fitness go-to carb at the moment for good reason – it’s filling and high in protein for a grain and goes well with cut up fruit in it), Chicken breast (start eating skinless chicken, if not the breast any part will do), Most fruits and vegetables, nonfat Greek yogurt and cottage cheese, and low carb protein bars/shakes (currently I like Quest bars, but Pure Protein is supposed to be really good as well).

  4. Stay away from starchy vegetables and grains (potatoes, rice, wheat, breads, sugar beets, corn, etc…) and aim for more leafy greens, broccoli, carrots, asparagus, or whatever kind of vegetables you are capable of eating in large quantities. Pretty much any fruit is good, but be aware bananas, grapes, and some berries are higher in sugar (and calories) than most other fruits, but they’re still better at filling you up than deserts and won’t spike your blood sugar.

  5. Prep meals in advance. Having good, healthy food on hand is a necessity. You’re 16, so I don’t expect you to be able to do much in the way of food shopping, but try to ask whoever does the shopping to get you healthy foods to eat. Fruit, veggies, meat, and small amounts of carbs. Sweet potatoes are so loaded with vitamins that I’d recommend doing them in moderation, same as brown rice and oatmeal. Make as much of your own food as you can, and at the dinner table make better choices, like more veg, less carb, more meat, etc…

  6. Use stevia. Why so specific about my preferred no-calorie sweetener? It is proven to not spike blood sugar. Even blood sugar levels are key to keeping hunger and cravings in check. I use it for my oatmeal and in place of sugar in any recipe that calls for it.

  7. Eat high fat, but good for you foods in moderation. Almonds and eggs are both calorie dense, but they are also incredibly good for you. I tend to eat eggs about 50% of the time vs oatmeal for breakfast. I go for a frittata or omlette so I can mix in mushrooms and spinach or onions and bell peppers to up the volume for very little in the way of calories to make the meal filling. It doesnt have to be fancy, you can just do a scramble with the veggies and not worry about proper omlette preparation.

Excuse my walls of text, when it comes to this subject I have so damn much to say.

TL;DR: Lift, walk, eat often, eat well, eat low calorie foods, create strategies that work for you to combat binge eating and depression, and learn to treat yourself with compassion.

1 point

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8th Oct 2011

There’s also this book which has really detailed illustrations of muscle activation for each exercise.

0 points

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12th May 2013

For protein shakes I usually get something from GNC or Popeye’s, look into BCAA’s specifically leucine, isoleucine, and valine are best for muscle growth. But you need some carbs and fat to give you energy, it’s extremely difficult for your body to turn protein into energy, so a serving/scoop that has 25g’s of Protein should also have around 50g’s of carbs and 6g’s of fat.

If you really want to understand strength training and muscle groups then try reading any edition of Strength Training Anatomy by Frédéric Delavier, all the exercises you can think of and how to perform them properly. Also BodyBuilding.com has a good article on the different ways you can use HIT techniques. Looking into Arthur Jones, Casey Viator, and the Colorado Experiment will give you an idea of what is possible with proper training, technique, and diet can achieve(overlooking the fact that the guy was born to build muscle) but it was done decades ago before all this super-synthetic supplements came about.