What is the opinion of Reddit about the
Starting Strength?

A total of 59 reviews of this product on Reddit.

1 point

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15th Aug 2021

You didn’t mention how tall you are.

If you’re quite light and think you’re skinny fat, you can’t go wrong getting into a strength training routine. I sure wish I’d had /r/bodyweightfitness and things like Starting Strength when I was your age. FWIW I’m in my early 40’s and a do 4 day a week heavy lifting workout, run 4 days a week and max that with IF.

1 point

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25th May 2021

Again, there is a link on this very page but I’ll link it below. I just noticed that you can get it on the Kindle for only $9.99 US thats amazing! I paid like $25 last time I bought it.

https://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Mark-Rippetoe-ebook/dp/B006XJR5ZA/ref=sr\_1\_1?crid=81U5MZ8202OJ&dchild=1&keywords=starting+strength+basic+barbell+training+3rd+edition&qid=1621964267&sprefix=Starting+Strength%2Caps%2C392&a…

1 point

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4th Mar 2019

You can get it for $10 on Amazon, which will give you the Kindle version that works on both your Kindle Fire and your phone using the Kindle reader app.

1 point

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13th Feb 2017

Sadly, I haven’t yet found an app worthy of replacing a good old notebook for tracking purposes. As for something you can have on you to help you with the proper form download the ebook of Starting Strength. That’s pretty much the gold standard when it comes to form. Nothing else even comes close.

https://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Mark-Rippetoe-ebook/dp/B006XJR5ZA/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1486993373&sr=8-1

1 point

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24th Feb 2017

If you want to learn how to deadlift correctly, get this book, Starting Strength. There’s no need to work on your “core” before starting, you just have to start light enough and get the form down.

1 point

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31st Oct 2016

Assuming they want weights beyond just bodyweight. Starting strength is really good for the basics the book is a great read for beginners. Highly recommend buying the physical copy to keep on your shelf for reference and study. It includes a program and explanations of the muscles involved and the exercise along with images.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B006XJR5ZA/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1

1 point

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7th Sep 2016

I read Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe. It outlines a routine you can follow and details exactly how to execute the lifts.

Start doing that routine and you will have purpose in the gym.

1 point

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7th Sep 2016

Tracking calories will cut the fat. Start lifting weights to shape your body. Read Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe. It outlines a strength routine and details exactly how to do each exercise. It will give you purpose in the gym.

1 point

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6th Sep 2016

Thank you man!

I would suggest getting on a structured routine. This will give you purpose in the gym and allow you to see progress. I would suggest Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe. It’s a good read too.

The most challenging part was just starting. I wanted to lose weight forever but could never get up and actually do it. One day I said “F*ck it, let’s go”. The rest is history.

1 point

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10th Mar 2016

Buy Starting Strength By Mark Rippetoe

The ebook is like $10.
This is the best decision you can make, especially since you’re lucky enough to be young.

After you exhaust it, get ”Practical Programming,” also by Rippetoe.

What is your height/weight?

1 point

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16th Aug 2015

I happen to be sitting next to a friend who is a nurse practitioner and asked her, she said to go to your GP but don’t freak out, the chest pains are probably heartburn.

If you have the money and interest to hire a personal trainer, by all means do it, BUT keep in mind that its scarily easy to get “certified” and there are a ton of PTs who know less than the average participant in this sub that are essentially working a sales job to sell hours. My sister is actually a certified trainer, I have no certs and I regularly answer her questions about things based on what I’ve learned on this sub and in various books (and from personal experience). So shop around and find someone worth hiring, don’t just take the first one that your gym might try to sell you.

If you don’t want to do that, check out the sidebar, follow this sub, use the Q&A section etc etc and you should be able to make good progress. I find that this sub tends to overhype Starting Strength, but as a skinny 18 year old you’re kind of a perfect fit to use it to get started if you’re interested in getting bigger and stronger. If you’re the researching type, it’s a good initial read on biomechnics even if you don’t choose to follow the workout program.

If you don’t want or have equipment or a gym /r/bodyweightfitness also has great ideas for workouts involving little to no equipment.

1 point

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3rd Aug 2015

New gym or different program.

The core of that program is squats, & you can’t squat properly using a smith machine

>“Squatting” in a Smith machine is an oxymoron. A Smith machine is not a squat rack, no matter what the girls at the front desk tell you. A squat cannot be performed on a Smith machine any more than it can be performed in a small closet with a hamster. Sorry. There is a gigantic difference between a machine that makes the bar path vertical for you and a squat that is executed correctly enough to have a vertical bar path. The job of keeping the bar path vertical should be done by the muscles, skeleton, and nervous system, not by grease fittings, rails, and floor bolts.

>A leg press machine – the “Hip Sled” – is even less useful to a lifter who is already strong enough to squat. By restricting the movement of joints that normally adjust their position during a squat, this device eliminates the expression of your normal biomechanics. The leg press may be useful for geriatric trainees or for special populations that cannot effectively use the squat as an exercise. But it is particularly heinous for healthy younger people because it allows the use of huge weights and therefore facilitates unwarranted bragging by those who should be squatting. A 1000-pound leg press is as irrelevant as a 500-pound quarter-squat.

Rippetoe, Mark (2013-11-07). Starting Strength (Kindle Locations 1709-1713). The Aasgaard Company. Kindle Edition.

1 point

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6th Jul 2015

>Am I squatting wrong?


>I’m doing front squats in a smith machine


>“Squatting” in a Smith machine is an oxymoron. A Smith machine is not a squat rack, no matter what the girls at the front desk tell you.

>A squat cannot be performed on a Smith machine any more than it can be performed in a small closet with a hamster. Sorry. There is a gigantic difference between a machine that makes the bar path vertical for you and a squat that is executed correctly enough to have a vertical bar path. The job of keeping the bar path vertical should be done by the muscles, skeleton, and nervous system, not by grease fittings, rails, and floor bolts.

>A leg press machine – the “Hip Sled” – is even less useful to a lifter who is already strong enough to squat. By restricting the movement of joints that normally adjust their position during a squat, this device eliminates the expression of your normal biomechanics. The leg press may be useful for geriatric trainees or for special populations that cannot effectively use the squat as an exercise. But it is particularly heinous for healthy younger people because it allows the use of huge weights and therefore facilitates unwarranted bragging by those who should be squatting. A 1000-pound leg press is as irrelevant as a 500-pound quarter-squat.

Rippetoe, Mark (2013-11-07). Starting Strength (Kindle Locations 1709-1713). The Aasgaard Company. Kindle Edition.

1 point

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30th Jul 2015

>My gym has a smith machine and sadly does not have a free barbell available

New gym or different program. It’s that simple

>“Squatting” in a Smith machine is an oxymoron. A Smith machine is not a squat rack, no matter what the girls at the front desk tell you.

>A squat cannot be performed on a Smith machine any more than it can be performed in a small closet with a hamster. Sorry.

>There is a gigantic difference between a machine that makes the bar path vertical for you and a squat that is executed correctly enough to have a vertical bar path. The job of keeping the bar path vertical should be done by the muscles, skeleton, and nervous system, not by grease fittings, rails, and floor bolts.

>A leg press machine – the “Hip Sled” – is even less useful to a lifter who is already strong enough to squat. By restricting the movement of joints that normally adjust their position during a squat, this device eliminates the expression of your normal biomechanics. The leg press may be useful for geriatric trainees or for special populations that cannot effectively use the squat as an exercise. But it is particularly heinous for healthy younger people because it allows the use of huge weights and therefore facilitates unwarranted bragging by those who should be squatting. A 1000-pound leg press is as irrelevant as a 500-pound quarter-squat.

Rippetoe, Mark (2013-11-07). Starting Strength (Kindle Locations 1709-1713). The Aasgaard Company. Kindle Edition.

1 point

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30th Jul 2015

>A leg press machine – the “Hip Sled” – is even less useful to a lifter who is already strong enough to squat. By restricting the movement of joints that normally adjust their position during a squat, this device eliminates the expression of your normal biomechanics. The leg press may be useful for geriatric trainees or for special populations that cannot effectively use the squat as an exercise. But it is particularly heinous for healthy younger people because it allows the use of huge weights and therefore facilitates unwarranted bragging by those who should be squatting. A 1000-pound leg press is as irrelevant as a 500-pound quarter-squat.

Rippetoe, Mark (2013-11-07). Starting Strength (Kindle Locations 1709-1713). The Aasgaard Company. Kindle Edition.

1 point

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28th Jul 2015

Wrong program for your gym. Get in a gym with power racks & barbells or do a different program.

Anyone else saying anything different doesn’t know what they’re talking about. Squats & Deadlifts cannot be performed effectively on a smith machine.


>“Squatting” in a Smith machine is an oxymoron. A Smith machine is not a squat rack, no matter what the girls at the front desk tell you. A squat cannot be performed on a Smith machine any more than it can be performed in a small closet with a hamster. Sorry. There is a gigantic difference between a machine that makes the bar path vertical for you and a squat that is executed correctly enough to have a vertical bar path. The job of keeping the bar path vertical should be done by the muscles, skeleton, and nervous system, not by grease fittings, rails, and floor bolts.

>A leg press machine – the “Hip Sled” – is even less useful to a lifter who is already strong enough to squat. By restricting the movement of joints that normally adjust their position during a squat, this device eliminates the expression of your normal biomechanics. The leg press may be useful for geriatric trainees or for special populations that cannot effectively use the squat as an exercise. But it is particularly heinous for healthy younger people because it allows the use of huge weights and therefore facilitates unwarranted bragging by those who should be squatting. A 1000-pound leg press is as irrelevant as a 500-pound quarter-squat.

Rippetoe, Mark (2013-11-07). Starting Strength (Kindle Locations 1709-1713). The Aasgaard Company. Kindle Edition.

1 point

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13th Jun 2015

Squatting is mainly a lower half exercise but the core and lower back is used for keeping the spine straight under load. Also as you lower down into the squat you need to lean forward a little to maintain balance. This again is where the core comes into play.

A great book that goes into squat in huge detail is this

<a target="_blank" href=http://www.amazon.co.uk/Starting-Strength-Mark-Rippetoe-ebook/dp/B006XJR5ZA/ref=sr_1_14?s=books&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1434165784&amp;sr=1-14&amp;keywords=strength+training&gt;Starting Strength</a>

1 point

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3rd Apr 2015

Read Starting Strength

>Faults and Corrections

>There won’t be nearly as many problems with the press as there are with the squat or deadlift, because there are fewer joints actively participating in the movement of the bar. Most problems are either starting position problems or bar path problems, and they result in a missed press for really just two reasons:

>* You fail to get the bar off your chest.

>* The distance between the shoulder and the bar becomes too long a moment arm to overcome: bar path problems.

>The first problem happens because you have lost your tightness in the start position due to breathing errors, positioning errors (chest not up, elbows not up, etc.), or a focus error or because you have just gotten tired or the weight is too heavy. The second problem occurs because you have produced an incorrect bar path. You pushed the bar forward instead of up, you failed to hold your position under the bar as you pushed it up, or you failed to get back under the bar after it crossed your forehead. Let’s look at the conditions under which these errors occur and figure out how to prevent them.

Rippetoe, Mark (2013-11-07). Starting Strength (Kindle Locations 2284-2289). The Aasgaard Company. Kindle Edition.

1 point

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18th Feb 2015

nothing wrong with barbells for beginners as long as you practice proper form. from is the most important part. read the book starting strength:

http://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Mark-Rippetoe-ebook/dp/B006XJR5ZA/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1424292521&amp;sr=8-1&amp;keywords=starting+strength

it explains in detail proper form for each of the main barbell lifts as well as the philosophy behind them.

1 point

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22nd Jan 2015

Grip on all the movements or specific ones?

Dead lifts are tricky because of the different sized weights.

The BEST book to answer all your questions thoroughly that I have encountered is going to be starting strength by mark rippletoe. It’s like 8 bucks on amazon I highly recommend it.

I use to have knee problems with my squat and elbow problems with my bench, but after I read that those pains went away and I was also able to teach people how to perform movements better.

So again, buy the book and read it lol. It’s not a breeze to read either. It’s more like a freaking textbook but hey, it works.

Here is the link to amazon.

It will answer all your questions and will make you smarter about lifting than just about 90 percent of the population my good sire.

If you still need additional help, or you don’t want to read the book, lmk and maybe you can record your lifts so I can critique your form.

Good day

1 point

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5th Sep 2014

Yes, although I the biggest improvement in overall comfort, control and strength on the bike came from taking up weight lifting – mainly low bar back squats and dead lifts.

Pick up a copy of Starting Strength if you’re interested.

2 points

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19th Feb 2015

Mark Rippetoe’s “Starting Strength” is where I got started, and it’s not an exaggeration to say that it’s been life-changing for me. His book lays out the rationale for a simple routine consisting of several basic lifts (squat, press, deadlift) and explains how to perform these lifts safely (so that you’re not hurting yourself) and effectively (so that you’re actually working toward building muscle mass).

Resources to check out:

  • Mark Rippetoe’s book – for people who are interested in the science, this book explains WHY these basic lifts are chosen for their effectiveness, and also explains why things like isolation exercises machines, etc. are really ineffective. It’s a bit more comprehensive than you probably need to get started, but as someone with an analytical mind and a technical background I found the book to be an excellent read. I’ve bought copies of this book for a lot of my engineering friends and many of them cite it as the resource that got them into lifting.
  • A condensed version of the program itself. – if you’re just concerned with what the program is and want to skip the why.
  • Youtube – hundreds of videos out there on how to perform basic lifts, just do a search for ‘how to squat’ or ‘how to perform military press’, etc.
  • /r/gainit – Great supportive community here on reddit. Have “stupid questions” about things you want to know but are afraid to ask? Direct them here and people will help you get informed.
1 point

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17th Feb 2022

Lower, like the front cover of the book.

Starting Strength on Amazon

1 point

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26th Dec 2021
1 point

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4th Oct 2021

Start there. If you don’t really have a grid for what’s in the book, you’re going to have trouble applying things we say.
Are there other options out there? Absolutely. But look at the group title

If you want this kool-aid:
You should be doing three sets of five on squats three times per week. One set of five deadlifts and alternate 3×5 bench and overhead press. You should add weight to your lifts each new without day. The book has more info on this

Here’s three different squat videos and a link to the book

https://youtu.be/nhoikoUEI8U

https://youtu.be/iVx2O6PXb6U

https://youtu.be/luiN9E3x768

Starting Strength https://www.amazon.com/dp/B006XJR5ZA/ref=cm_sw_r_apan_glt_NCQAQSNNA6YXBFE9ZRVN

1 point

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16th Sep 2021

Alright.

A linear progression program is one where you increase the weight on the bar, linearly, every workout. So if you squat 130 pounds Monday, your next squat workout is 135 pounds, and the one after that is 140 pounds, etc. Typically this is paired with a full body split, so you squat may go up 15 pounds a week. You can easily see where over time, this gets weight on the bar quickly. A non-linear program would be one that the weight doesn’t increase from session to session. As far as I could tell, your program didn’t have any set progression scheme. You could say you were going by feel, but I would argue that you were selling yourself short by not having the expertise to make the right judgement calls. I have a feeling you are substantially stronger than you realize, or at least you will be with proper training.

If you have an Amazon account, here’s a kindle link. Keep in mind that you don’t HAVE to do this specific program unless you want to, but I would still read the book to learn proper form, and I would still do a linear progression program. This is a good YouTube playlist and channel that can help you with form and the basics.

No need to worry about cutting. Your experience may differ, but I got into the low to mid 300s for 5 on my squat while on a deficit the entire time. It’s harder, but it’s doable.

For nutrition I would go here and put in your email to get the free ebook. I cannot recommend that book highly enough as an initial setup guide.

> I really did feel like I was making proper progress

Don’t get down on yourself dude, everyone has to start somewhere. You did make progress, and with the proper tools and knowledge you can kick that progress into high gear. You’re at a fantastic age for it.

Like I said though, you don’t have to do starting strength. This, this (the novice one in the package), this, this, or even this would all be fine. The idea is to find what you enjoy, what you will stick to, and what you will put in the work for, and building a foundation of proper form and strength. Learn how to push yourself. Get to at least near the end of the linear progression, and you will be in a significantly better spot with a lot more options open to you.

And no problem man. Your heart was in the right place, you just needed a little guidance. Nothing to worry about

1 point

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23rd Dec 2020

Even better, read this book and get to work.

1 point

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5th Sep 2018

I strongly recommend the Starting Strength book and program.

The book is going to explain a lot of what you really need to know: proper form.

The program is simple enough that you can easily follow it. You have three main (fantastic) composite lifts: barbell squat, barbell row, and bench press. You will do four sets of up to 10 exercises. You will increase your weight weekly. You can complement with other isolation exercises depending on what you want to emphasize.

&#x200B;

If you don’t want to buy the book just remember. PROPER FORM IS THE MOST IMPORTANT PART OF LIFTING. And full range of motion is important to. If you do half reps with heavy weight and poor form. You will injure yourself and you will reduce your gain potential. If you don’t want to buy the book, go to youtube or bodybuilder.com and watch videos that explain the proper form of any exercise that you plan to make.

1 point

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27th Oct 2017

In Starting Strength it goes over all of that. The only reason you go from 5×5 to 3×5 is that the weights are just too damn heavy to do a 5×5, but it’ll take you awhile to get there. But I really really want to provide some value to you by SCREAMING don’t overthink it man. I’m a systems engineer so my entire mindset is to find the most optimal way to do something, this led to an overwhelm and massive overthinking. I tried this bodybuilding.com program, then that program, did high reps, low weight, hypertrophy, etc.

What you have to realize as a beginner is that there is no secret to building muscle and strength. You’re leveraging the law of adaptation, stating that your body will adapt to the stress that you put it through. So in theory, all programs work, but do they accomplish your goals?

So after saying that, it would be fair to assume that the program/exercises that stress your body the most, would grow your body the most. The bench, deadlift, overhead press, squat, row provide the most systemic stress and will promote the most growth.

Doing a bodybuilding program as a novice lifter is the fastest way to create muscular imbalances and fuck up your symetry. If your biceps get bigger than your shoulders, or your quads overpower your hamstrings, it’s just not useful.

With the program Starting Strength ( Or Stronglifts ), you’re using progressive overload on big compound exercises. So you’re working the body out as a system, rather than isolation exercises. And like we learned before, the more systemic stress, the more systemic growth.

So If I could give you one piece of advice, after years of wasting my own damn time and hundreds of hours, just focus on compound movements, get good at them, love them, obsess over them, watch form videos for fun, record your form, and just make it your primary objective to get stronger in the big lifts. I promise you, you’ll notice more strength and muscle gains than your friends doing the traditional bodybuilding routines.

Then, after 1-2 years of lifting heavy ass weight, you can identify your symmetry and decide if you want to isolate your biceps or shoulders. But until your squatting over 300, benching over 225, and deadlifting 400, I don’t really see a point in isolating workouts.

Buy this book, eat in a caloric surplus and have fun.

1 point

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11th Oct 2016

Watch this video and practice some Goat Bag Swings

If you don’t have a KB, you can use a sandbag, a dumbbell or even a plate for the same effect. This is a patterning movement, not a strength building exercise, so no need to try to bust out 3 x 10 Goat Bag Swings with increasing weight. Just do a few when you warm up until the move feels natural.

When you lower the Deadlift bar, you just do the goat bag move until the bar clears your knees. Then bend your knees the rest of the way to the floor. It’s really that simple.

Also, It’s probably harder to learn at a lowish weight of 135 – it’s easy to get a light bar to move off of the ideal straight line path. With a heavy bar, the lowering pretty much happens on its own.

And most importantly, read Rippetoe’s book You don’t necessarily need to read the programming part of it, but his technical descriptions of the lifts – especially deadlift – are the best I’ve seen. If you’re struggling with lowering the bar, I suspect your move from the floor to the top isn’t correct either.

1 point

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15th Sep 2016
1 point

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7th Sep 2016

io everyday and I began lifting using Starting Strength

1 point

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7th Sep 2016

Thanks man, and good work losing all that weight. I would suggest getting started on a strength routine. Read Starting Strength

1 point

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7th Sep 2016

Read Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe. It outlines a strength routine and details exactly how to do each exercise. It will give you purpose in the gym.

1 point

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26th Apr 2016

Squats 3×5 thrice weekly.

buy this or steal it to learn how.

1 point

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7th Mar 2016

https://www.reddit.com/r/Fitness/wiki/faq#wiki_exercise_details

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B006XJR5ZA/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?ie=UTF8&amp;btkr=1

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRLOLGZl3-QTaJfLmAKgoAw

Beginner Routine -Starting Strength, Ice Cream Fitness, Grayskulls LP, Strong Lifts are all (basically) the same. Pick one and do it for 6 months. Starting Strength takes the least amount of time with Ice Cream Fitness the most. They’re all 3 times a week 1-1:30s total.

If you’re a reader the book Starting Strength is invaluable for understanding the 4 main lifts as well as some importance of strength training in general to every sport. So even if you decide to do ICF or SLs i’d purchase the book for squat, deadlift, bench and Over Head Press form advice and pictures.

Allen Thrall has great form videos on squats, deadlifts, bench, rows and OHP.

You’ll get stronger with more lean mass and less fat from weight lifting. Good Luck!!!

1 point

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29th Jan 2016

Stronglifts is a great place to start. Read everything on that web site and use that program until you stop making the kind of progress you want to be making, then consider looking at other programs that have more volume.

If you want a good read about exactly how to do the lifts, download the Kindle edition of Starting Strength and read that. I like the SL program better for beginners (has rows, doesn’t have power cleans), but SS has great descriptions of form for the lifts.
http://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Mark-Rippetoe-ebook/dp/B006XJR5ZA

Also watch some of these form videos on Youtube:
https://www.reddit.com/r/Fitness/comments/3qoeyv/the_ultimate_form_video_list/

1 point

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20th Jan 2016

Another recommendation for something like Stronglifts, Starting Strength etc. I personally just started Stronglifts after a long layoff that basically put me back in the “beginner” category. Like it a lot. Couple notes:

1) FORM, FORM, FORM. Take the time to learn / perfect form. There’s a lot of good resources out there. I would definitely recommend Mark Rippetoe’s Starting Strength book that breaks down form on the major barbell lifts: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B006XJR5ZA/

If you look on YouTube there’s some stuff in the Art of Manliness channel where Rippetoe gives good demonstrations on the squat, bench, dead etc: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=rippetoe+art+of+manliness

2) Intensity. If you’re just starting out, try and resist the urge to go too heavy. It’s an ego thing for a lot of people. Start extremely light with everything, add weight incrementally and focus on #1.

Here’s a link to the SL site: http://stronglifts.com/5×5/
(SL also has a GREAT mobile app for tracking workouts etc)

edit>links

1 point

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2nd Jan 2016

I’m seeing recommendations to look at YouTube for advice, which is a good idea, but there are a lot of fitness YouTubers who don’t have a fucking clue what they’re talking about, so just make sure you find a reputable source.

A few channels I really like:

Totally joking about the last one. Do not take any serious advice from Dom Mazetti. It’s good for a few laughs though, and the other three are legit.

Other than that, I highly recommend buying the Starting Strength book by Mark Rippetoe. I’m completely convinced it’s the single best resource available for any gym noob who wants to get into lifting.

1 point

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9th Apr 2015

OP look at these materials & compare your form.


Here are 3 images from Starting Strength that should show you proper squat form & bar grip from multiple angles:

Image 1

Image 2

Image 3

…& a video

Video: How To Low Bar Squat with Mark Rippetoe

1 point

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17th Apr 2015

Here are 3 images from Starting Strength that should show you proper squat form & bar grip from multiple angles:

Image 1

Image 2

Image 3

…& a video

Video: How To Low Bar Squat with Mark Rippetoe

1 point

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5th Feb 2015

Could you buy on amazon and read on your computer? Starting Strength

1 point

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16th Feb 2015
  • Mark Rippletoe’s Starting Strength. Absolutely fantastic resource for barbell exercises, not only explaining proper form but just about everything behind the physiological movements.
  • Christopher Hadnagy’s Social Engineering: The Art of Human Hacking. Really good resource for this wanting to get into social engineering or just plainly curious of the subject. I’ve found it’s also a good read for those in sales that want a few tips and tricks to employ.
  • David Suzuki and Wayne Grady’s Tree: A Life Story. Beautiful balance of science and captivating prose as they follow the life cycle of a douglas fir. Completely changed how I look at trees and their ecosystems.
1 point

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16th Jan 2015

Agreed with /u/Rhinocalypse on deloading and leaning the basics (both squatters in the video). There’s no depth and a number of other issues.

I found Untamed Strength: &quot;How To&quot; SQUAT – High bar/Low bar helpful. And Starting Strength is a great book to begin power lifting. The first chapter has over 50 pages dedicated to the squat, which goes to show how much there is to learn / how important it is to get it right to avoid injury.

1 point

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15th Jan 2015
1 point

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10th Jan 2015

No problem, takes no time at all. In all of those programs and books I mentioned they will tell you exactly what weight to lift and when. There are a handful of programs that pretty much the entire weightlifting community agrees are the best of all time, so your goal should be to use one of those programs as soon as you are able. My favorite of those and the one I would recommend you do is Jim Wendler’s 5/3/1. He has a book that goes with it and teaches you everything you need to know to use that program and have a training plan for the next 1-5 years.

The problem is, 5/3/1 works by far the best once you’ve gotten the basics down and have some weightlifting experience. Things are different when you’re first starting out. You’re focused on technique, learning the different lifts, timing your sets and reps, etc. You start out lifting little to no weight, but as a beginner you will progress much more quickly than usual. For that reason you should read a good book like starting strength, and then do a beginner program for at least a few months. Once you get that quality experience you can move on to the 5/3/1 and know for a fact you’re taking the most proven and intelligent approach you can. It’s very relaxing knowing you’re doing the right thing instead of worrying about it and jumping from program to program. Get yourself a bench so you can do all 3 of the big 3! Get creative and somehow find a way, don’t take no for an answer. You absolutely must find a way to bench press, it’s hugely important for growing your upper body (and it’s the most important lift for feeling like a manly man).

Here’s the stronglift 5×5 book, it’s free: http://stronglifts.com/5×5/

Read that and it should answer all your questions.

0 points

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13th Oct 2018

Check out strong lift 5×5 workout. Basic lifts. There’s an app to track your progress. Once you understand what you’re doing and establish a baseline with your strength you can change your routine to focus on muscle groups.

Read about pros and cons of Stronglifts here:https://www.bodybuilding.com/content/is-stronglifts-5×5-the-right-training-program-for-you.html

Guides for proper form here:
https://stronglifts.com/blog/

Good reading for strength and nutrition:
Starting Strength https://www.amazon.com/dp/B006XJR5ZA/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_yNEWBb9R5GAH9

0 points

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11th Aug 2014
0 points

·

28th Sep 2014

Considering you’re only really concerned with appearance you might want to replace Stronglifts with AllPro. But I’d start with empty bar Stronglifts for the first 12 weeks to get your form right (focus on form) and base of strength up.

Generic make-me-fit copypaste:

Welcome!

You could probably benefit from reading the wiki.

This is my /r/fitness guide for people with generic fitness goals. It isn’t the only way to go about it but everything in it is frequently recommended by people in /r/fitness:

  • Try and get in the mindset that this is for the rest of your life. You won’t be doing exactly this forever but you will be doing something like it forever.
  • Choose a good gym and start Stronglifts. Stronglifts v1 is also worth a read, as is Starting Strength.
  • The pull/chin up & dip accessories in Stronglifts v1 are recommended if you want to accentuate your arms and back.
  • If you can’t get your own equipment or join a gym then read the /r/bodyweightfitness wiki and start one of the Beginner Routines.
  • If you want to improve your cardio then start Couch to 5K. You could also find a sport you love and do that. Yoga is good for stretching and mild cardio.
  • You’ll may need to increase your flexibity. Do bodyweight squats and hamstring stretches and chest stretches 2-3 times per day. For more advanced stretching see Starting Stretching and Molding Mobility.
  • Estimate your bodyfat then calculate your TDEE using the Katch-Mc-le formula.
  • Subtract between 500 kCal and 20% of your TDEE to lose weight. Add 200-500 kCal to gain weight & muscle. Use MyFitnessPal to ensure you hit that caloric goal each day.
  • Get at least 0.68g of protein per day per pound of lean body mass (body weight – (body weight x body fat percentage)). Anything over 1.2g/lb is probably not beneficial but also not harmful.
  • Eat mostly fresh food you prepare yourself. It gets you in better habits and is usually better for fibre and micro nutrients.
  • DOMS (delayed onset muscle soreness) may be a problem for the first week or two, but your body will adapt quickly if you don’t skip workouts.
  • Consistency is key. You do not need to be motivated. Motivation is fleeting and cannot be relied upon. Workouts are like grocery shopping or brushing your teeth – it’s just something you have to do.
  • If you’re at the gym and really not “feeling it” focus on the fact that the best way to get out of there is to complete your workout as efficiently as possible. Better form and focus will get it done that much quicker.
  • You will not get more ripped/muscled/bigger than you want to. That takes effort, time and intention. You will not wake up one day and be accidentally Arnold.

Stronglifts is a beginner programs designed to maximise your strength gains in a relatively safe way and increase the chances you’ll follow the program by being relatively easy to learn and follow. It isn’t meant to be followed forever though.

Progress guide to Stronglifts:

  • If you successfully complete an exercises sets with good form add 2.5kg/5lb to that exercise on the next workout (5kg/10lb on deadlifts until you hit 100kg/225lb, then 2.5kg/5lb).
  • If you can’t complete your sets with good form repeat the same weight for that exercise next workout.
  • If you try the same weight three times in a row and can’t complete it on the third then deload 10% for the next workout and use the same progression as before.
  • When you get to a second deload for that exercise switch to either 3×5 or 3×3 and use the same progression as before.
  • When you get to a second deload at 3×5 switch to 3×3.
  • When you get to a second deload at 3×3 switch to an intermediate program that matches your goals.

Ignore anyone who tells you at what weights these things should happen. Just follow the program. Your body can do what it can do, trying to match an average or macho idea of what you “should” be able to do instead of what you can do will just get you injured and/or stalling.

If you want to track the changes in your body measure your weight, shoulders, biceps, calves, chest, forearms, hips, neck, waist and thighs or whatever combination of those you care about.

  • Record each measurement every day.
  • Create an average for each measurement for the entire week.

Measurements averaged out over a week and then analysed on a three weekly basis give a much better idea of your real progress. Learn to ignore the daily measurements – they will deceive you and send you on an emotional rollercoaster. The weekly trend tells you what’s what.

People often regret not taking enough photos of their progress. Take photos regularly in consistent conditions (lighting, time of day, clothing, angles).

Useful form videos:

Bench Press

Deadlift

Squats

Pendlay/Barbell Rows

Overhead Press

0 points

·

2nd Oct 2014

Welcome!

You could probably benefit from reading the wiki.

This is my /r/fitness guide for people with generic fitness goals. It isn’t the only way to go about it but everything in it is frequently recommended by people in /r/fitness:

  • Try and get in the mindset that this is for the rest of your life. You won’t be doing exactly this forever but you will be doing something like it forever.
  • Choose a good gym and start Stronglifts. Stronglifts v1 is also worth a read, as is Starting Strength.
  • The pull/chin up & dip accessories in Stronglifts v1 are recommended if you want to accentuate your arms and back.
  • If you can’t get your own equipment or join a gym then read the /r/bodyweightfitness wiki and start one of the Beginner Routines.
  • If you want to improve your cardio then start Couch to 5K. You could also find a sport you love and do that. Yoga is good for stretching and mild cardio.
  • Do bodyweight squats, hamstring stretches and chest stretches 2-3 times per day to increase your flexibility for lifting. For more advanced stretching see Starting Stretching and Molding Mobility.
  • Estimate your bodyfat then calculate your TDEE using the Katch-Mc-le formula.
  • Subtract between 500 kCal and 20% of your TDEE to lose weight. Add 200-500 kCal to gain weight & muscle. Use MyFitnessPal to ensure you hit that caloric goal each day.
  • Get from 0.68 to 1.2 grams of protein per day per pound of lean body mass (body weight – (body weight x body fat percentage)). Anything over 1.2g/lb is probably not beneficial.
  • Create your own menus based on foods you know and like. You won’t get it perfectly right at first but you will learn the nutritional contents of foods, knowledge that will be useful for the rest of your life. Eat mostly fresh food you prepare yourself. It’s usually better for fibre and micro nutrients.
  • DOMS (delayed onset muscle soreness) may be a problem for the first week or two, but your body will adapt quickly if you don’t skip workouts and you will not longer get DOMS.
  • Consistency is key. You do not need to be motivated. Motivation is fleeting and cannot be relied upon. Workouts are like grocery shopping or brushing your teeth – it’s just something you have to do.
  • If you’re at the gym and really not “feeling it” focus on the fact that the best way to get out of there is to complete your workout as efficiently as possible. Better form and focus will get it done that much quicker.
  • You will not get more ripped/muscled/bigger than you want to. That takes effort, time and intention. You will not wake up one day and be accidentally Arnold.

Stronglifts is a beginner programs designed to maximise your strength gains in a relatively safe way and increase the chances you’ll follow the program by being relatively easy to learn and follow. It isn’t meant to be followed forever though.

Progress guide to Stronglifts:

  • If you successfully complete an exercises sets with good form add 2.5kg/5lb to that exercise on the next workout (5kg/10lb on deadlifts until you hit 100kg/225lb, then 2.5kg/5lb).
  • If you can’t complete your sets with good form repeat the same weight for that exercise next workout.
  • If you try the same weight three times in a row and can’t complete it on the third then deload 10% for the next workout and use the same progression as before.
  • When you get to a second deload for that exercise switch to either 3×5 or 3×3 and use the same progression as before.
  • When you get to a second deload at 3×5 switch to 3×3.
  • When you get to a second deload at 3×3 switch to an intermediate program that matches your goals.

Ignore anyone who tells you at what weights these things should happen. Just follow the program. Your body can do what it can do, trying to match an average or macho idea of what you “should” be able to do instead of what you can do will just get you injured and/or stalling.

If you want to track the changes in your body measure your weight, shoulders, biceps, calves, chest, forearms, hips, neck, waist and thighs, flexed and/or unflexed or whatever combination of those you care about.

  • Record each measurement every day.
  • Create an average for each measurement for the entire week. MFPExport.nl is good for this with weight.

Learn to ignore the daily measurements – they will deceive you and send you on an emotional rollercoaster. The weekly trend tells you what’s what.

People often regret not taking enough photos of their progress. Take photos from more than one angle regularly in consistent conditions (lighting, time of day, clothing, angles).

Useful form videos:

Bench Press

Deadlift

Squats

Pendlay/Barbell Rows

Overhead Press

0 points

·

7th Dec 2014

Welcome!

You could probably benefit from reading the wiki.

This is my /r/fitness guide for people with generic fitness goals. It isn’t the only way to go about it but everything in it is frequently recommended by people in /r/fitness:

  • Try and get in the mindset that this is for the rest of your life. You won’t be doing exactly this forever but you will be doing something like it forever.
  • Choose a good gym and start Stronglifts. Stronglifts v1 is also worth a read, as is Starting Strength.
  • The pull/chin up & dip accessories in Stronglifts v1 and/or the Stronglifts apps are recommended if you want to accentuate your arms and back.
  • If you can’t get your own equipment or join a gym then read the /r/bodyweightfitness wiki and start one of the Beginner Routines.
  • If you want to improve your cardio then start Couch to 5K. You could also find a sport you love and do that. Yoga is good for stretching and mild cardio.
  • Do bodyweight squats, hamstring stretches and chest stretches 2-3 times per day to increase your flexibility for lifting. For more advanced stretching see Starting Stretching and Molding Mobility.
  • Estimate your bodyfat then calculate your TDEE using the Katch-Mc-le formula.
  • Subtract between 500 kCal and 20% of your TDEE to lose weight. Add 200-500 kCal to gain weight & muscle. Use MyFitnessPal to ensure you hit that caloric goal each day.
  • Get from 0.68 to 1.2 grams of protein per day per pound of lean body mass (body weight – (body weight x body fat percentage)). Anything over 1.2g/lb is probably not beneficial.
  • Create your own menus based on foods you know and like. You won’t get it perfectly right at first but you will learn the nutritional contents of foods, knowledge that will be useful for the rest of your life. Eat mostly fresh food you prepare yourself. It’s usually better for fibre and micro nutrients.
  • DOMS (delayed onset muscle soreness) may be a problem for the first week or two, but your body will adapt quickly if you don’t skip workouts and you will not longer get DOMS.
  • Consistency is key. You do not need to be motivated. Motivation is fleeting and cannot be relied upon. Workouts are like grocery shopping or brushing your teeth – it’s just something you have to do.
  • If you’re at the gym and really not “feeling it” focus on the fact that the best way to get out of there is to complete your workout as efficiently as possible. Better form and focus will get it done that much quicker.
  • You will not get more ripped/muscled/bigger than you want to. That takes effort, time and intention. You will not wake up one day and be accidentally Arnold.

Stronglifts is a beginner program designed to maximise your strength gains in a relatively safe way and increase the chances you’ll follow the program by being relatively easy to learn and follow. It isn’t meant to be followed forever though.

Progress guide to Stronglifts:

  • If you successfully complete an exercises sets with good form add 2.5kg/5lb to that exercise on the next workout (5kg/10lb on deadlifts until you hit 100kg/225lb, then 2.5kg/5lb).
  • If you can’t complete your sets with good form repeat the same weight for that exercise next workout.
  • If you try the same weight three times in a row and can’t complete it on the third then deload 10% for the next workout and use the same progression as before.
  • When you get to a second deload for that exercise switch to either 3×5 or 3×3 and use the same progression as before.
  • When you get to a second deload at 3×5 switch to 3×3.
  • When you get to a second deload at 3×3 switch to an intermediate program that matches your goals.

Ignore anyone who tells you at what weights these things should happen. Just follow the program. Your body can do what it can do, trying to match an average or macho idea of what you “should” be able to do instead of what you can do will just get you injured and/or stalling.

If you want to track the changes in your body measure your weight, shoulders, biceps, calves, chest, forearms, hips, neck, waist and thighs, flexed and/or unflexed or whatever combination of those you care about.

  • Record each measurement every day.
  • Create an average for each measurement for the entire week. MFPExport.nl is good for this with weight.

Learn to ignore the daily measurements – they will mislead you as to your actual progress and send you on an emotional rollercoaster. The weekly trend tells you what’s what.

People often regret not taking enough photos of their progress. Take photos from more than one angle regularly in consistent conditions (lighting, time of day, clothing, pose).

Useful form videos:

Bench Press

Deadlift

Squats

Pendlay/Barbell Rows

Overhead Press

0 points

·

8th Jan 2013

If your back and knees are getting injured from barbell squats, you’re almost certainly not performing them correctly. It’s important to hit parallel with your knees tracked out so that you utilize your hamstrings and hips more than your quads, which will prevent shearing along the knee. I’m not sure what your knee limitations are but low bar back squats are the single most important exercise so it’s worth getting it right. Actually proper squats should strengthen your knees… I recommend going to /r/weightroom for more advice in this area, as well as picking up a copy of Starting Strength.

0 points

·

2nd Mar 2013

Deadlift form is not good. First rep was not bad, but remaining reps not so much. Too much arch in your back and your butt is too low at the start. Notice how your butt rises first? You also don’t push your butt back when lowering the bar and thus have to take the bar around your knees.

Squat form also not so good. No hip drive and not low enough.

Buy this: http://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-ebook/dp/B006XJR5ZA/ref=tmm_kin_title_0

It’s a whopping $10 and it will fix your form issues.

0 points

·

18th May 2012

So, I’m gonna guess you haven’t read the book, cause the title of Ch7 is “Useful Assistance Exercises.”

http://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-ebook/dp/B006XJR5ZA/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1337380915&amp;sr=1-1

-Biceps: Power Clean, also downstroke of bench

-Lats: DEADLIFT are you serious?

-Traps: OH Press, Deadlift

-Calves: Squat, OH Press, Powerclean