What is the opinion of Reddit about the
Starting Strength: Basic Barbell Training, 3rd edition?

A total of 237 reviews of this product on Reddit.

24 points

·

13th Sep 2020

If you’re properly balanced left to right, as is no joint injuries, I think a basic strength routine would build your spinal muscles and posterior chain.

Mark Rippetoe’s book Starting Strenght would be my recommendation.

https://smile.amazon.com/dp/0982522738/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_uCKxFbEN62H1P

11 points

·

25th Feb 2018

First, thank your father profusely for being awesome. Second, don’t abuse his generosity by ordering the entire Rogue catalog – start with the bare essentials for full body strength.

1) A power cage so you can squat and bench safely by yourself.
2) A flat bench
3) An bar for powerlifting
4) Plates – 4×45, 2×25, 4×10, 2×5, 2×2.5.
5) A copy of Starting Strength.

Get the book immediately and actually READ it. All of it. You can do this while working on finding the gym equipment. As far as the exact pieces of equipment, just remember that it didn’t have to be “the best”, just better than you are right now.

Continue to ask questions and do your own research. Good luck!

6 points

·

17th Jun 2021

for the love of god, please don’t think your only option for getting ‘in shape’ is cardio.

spend the time developing strength. strength is much harder to acquire than cardio. if you’re fairly strong, you can build cardio in days. it takes months to develop a good amount of strength. it makes every part of your life easier. https://smile.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Basic-Barbell-Training/dp/0982522738

6 points

·

30th Oct 2020

Read this : https://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Basic-Barbell-Training/dp/0982522738/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=starting+strength&qid=1604018685&sprefix=Starting+stre&sr=8-1

When I was your age, it was so hard to find good information on weight training. It would have been such a game changer if I could have read this at the age of 14, really. Maybe you can find a copy at the library if you can’t buy it. Good luck!

5 points

·

19th Sep 2021

Move your touch point (the point where the bar touches the chest) up. Touch the bar to your sternum even with your nipple line. This will help you feel the lift in you chest.

Consult figure 5-13, 5-15 and the “Elbows” section of chapter 5 “The Bench Press” in the blue book, Staring Strength: Basic Barbell Training, 3rd edition, for a detailed explanation of why this is the correct touch point for beginner lifters especially.

3 points

·

17th Jun 2021

A long time ago, I used to be a personal trainer. Most of my clients were women in their late 30s and their 40s. So I have some experience here. I’m writing this before work, so I have to be brief.

First, if you indeed have a barbell set, buy this book, and work the program in it until your numbers stop going up. That’s it, it’s that simple. This program is probably the best thing that has happened to beginner weight training, pretty much ever. It’s designed for you to work pretty much by yourself, so you don’t need a spotter.

Second, let go of any worry you have about being big or bulky, and just pump the iron like Arnold. You will not turn into a veiny She-Beast overnight, or even at all. If it were that easy, every single young dude ever would be walking around, yoked out like the Hulk. Even young guys, who put on muscle faster than literally anyone else, have to work real hard to get big. So don’t worry about it and just lean into the iron. You will get bigg*er*, but nowhere near to the degree you might be worrying about.

And as a post-script, you might find, as many of my clients found, to their surprise, that they liked that their arms bulked up a bit. The way it actually looks on your body and how it actually makes you feel is not always the same as what you’re concerned about. Just food for thought.

3 points

·

12th Sep 2016

Pick up the book Starting Strength. $24 on Amazon with prime. Squats are the first (of 5) exercises covered.

https://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Basic-Barbell-Training/dp/0982522738/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1473687821&sr=1-1&keywords=starting+strength

I like it because it’s perfect for the beginner, has lots of diagrams and photos, and covers a wide range of issues and rookie mistakes.

Even if you aren’t specifically using SS5x5, it still will be a great investment. Plus, a physical book is better as a reference material when you don’t want to jump on the internet or for reading material before going to bed.

2 points

·

27th May 2021

You need strength training, aka weight lifting. Read Starting Strength.

Ignore his diet advice, it’s for skinny 18 year olds not you. He explains the basic idea behind strength training better than anyone, though. The short version is that you need to continually increase the weight that you are lifting as you get stronger. The idea is to force your body to adapt to lifting progressively heavier loads.

You can make some initial progress with bodyweight exercises and dumbbells (if you have a selection of sizes), but eventually you will need a barbell.

2 points

·

16th Mar 2021

If you’re doing barbell squats, and you’re worried about something, and you suspect it’s your form as you’ve stated in other comments, then I seriously can’t recommend this book enough. You sound like the perfect audience who really needs to have this book in your life. You’ll learn more about proper form than you ever realized existed.

https://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Basic-Barbell-Training/dp/0982522738

2 points

·

26th Nov 2015

I tried various medications for a while and all of them would work for a little while and then stop as I got used to them.

What I have found to be more effective for me is meditation and weight lifting. I don’t frequent this sub so not sure what the general opinion of them is here.

But my experience has been that just trying to concentrate on my breathing and sitting still really helps me practice self-control and helps teach me to focus. There’s tons of different ways to meditate so if yo are interested just experiment around and see if any work for you. I don’t find it relaxing but doing it ever week or so seems to help me focus.

The other thing that has helped me is barbell weight training which was a surprise. But learning how to control your muscles very precisely helps develop the nervous system. And doing things like squats with correct form requires a surprisingly amount of focus. It requires that you focus on most of your muscle groups at once and keep everything in the right position. If you have an interest in this I recommend the book Starting Strength to learn the basics.

1 point

·

10th Apr 2022

Usually it’s a good idea to follow proper form. Although with these types of machines like in OP’s video… They’re typically already built in such a way where it’s going to be hard to injure yourself. Having said that, it is possible. We’ve all seen those videos of people locking their knees at the leg press.

Form is critically important though when you are doing exercises with the barbell like deadlifting, squats, bench press, etc. People move up in weight without following the proper form and then they injure themselves.

I’ll take this opportunity to plug a book by Mark Rippetoe, <em>Starting Strength</em> for anyone who wants to start barbell exercises. Once you read the book, you will then notice shitty advice all over the internet, especially places like Instagram.

1 point

·

7th Mar 2022

Buy the book, join a gym, and follow the program. If you can afford it, book a few sessions with a personal trainer to learn the four basic exercises (squat, deadlift, press, bench). Starting Strength: Basic Barbell Training, 3rd edition https://www.amazon.com/dp/0982522738/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_glt_i_PTP1FNDZ7QMAR2DFN22D

That’s what I did 18 months ago. I have gained 10 pounds of muscle but I am in my late 40’s. You are in your 20’s and will likely see faster gains.

1 point

·

8th Feb 2022

Deadlifts would be the best primary exercise for that as it works the whole chain from neck to feet.

But I would suggest getting Mark Rippetoe’s book “Starting Strength” and doing that routine. You need more than just powerful legs, you’re going to need a strong core and shoulders.

1 point

·

26th Dec 2021

Their app, podcast, book, website etc. The app is very helpful during the workout to plan routine and calculate warm-up weights. The book is excellent to study in order learn the alignment details of the exercises. Study it, highlight it etc. Starting Strength: Basic Barbell Training, 3rd edition https://www.amazon.com/dp/0982522738/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_glt_fabc_W8G5SHS9AHKYF3GEYP20

1 point

·

22nd Dec 2021

Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe

That book outlines the program that this sub is dedicated to. It provides lots of information about programming, technique etc.

1 point

·

1st Nov 2021

Looks and personality actually intersect to some degree. You say that being chubby is just looks, but it’s also a personality trait to some extent. I mean, if that girl is going to the gym 3 times a week and spending a lot of effort on her appearance, then that becomes part of her personality. It’s somewhat common that people will be drawn to other people who put in a similar level of effort.

Honestly though, there are a ton of fit women who would be attracted to a chubby 5’6 brown guy. The bigger issue is probably just that you’re lacking self confidence. lol I say “just” like it’s something that’s easy to fix, it’s unfortunately not. Going to the gym will help a TON with self confidence though. I think it actually makes some chemical changes to your brain or something. There’s a great book called Starting Strength that can help you get started at the gym.

There are a bunch of other ways to help with self confidence too. They mostly involve getting out of your comfort zone and improving yourself. Dance classes are a great one since they let you easily interact with a bunch people too.

Just learning how to truly like yourself is also a huge confidence boost. So doing any hobbies you’ve always wanted to do or fixing things about yourself that you’ve always wanted to fix will help a bunch too.

You can definitely do it though! You’re only 22 so you have tons of time still.

1 point

·

28th Oct 2021

This book will address both of your questions.

Follow the dietary recommendations, do the lifts, you’ll get stronger for sure.

1 point

·

20th Oct 2021

You can buy the book here.

Tons of related information on starting strength forums.

Vids from mark rippetoe and Alan thrall on YouTube.

1 point

·

25th Sep 2021

Agreed. The worst part is it’s not like they get motivated because they think it’s cool and something to aspire to, they get motivated because they think these exercises are a super effective way to work out and the secret to getting ripped.

That’s not how this works.

Want to build functional strength and add muscle mass?

  1. Get this book: https://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Basic-Barbell-Training/dp/0982522738
  2. Develop a routine around that book
  3. Eat right
  4. Sleep

Shit doesn’t have to be complicated.

1 point

·

21st Sep 2021

Welcome to r/StartingStrength… a sub for people who follow the specific method outlined in the book Starting Strength: Basic Barbell Training, 3rd edition.

This method involves using heavy barbell lifts to get strong instead of living life like a man with glass bones.

1 point

·

19th Sep 2021

Honestly, you do look better in the second picture.if I were to give you one digestible piece of advice for lifting it would be this: Starting Strength. There is no better book on the subject.

1 point

·

18th Sep 2021

Some very heavy deadlifts have been pulled from the wrong starting position. But this is r/startingstrength, a sub for people following the specific method outlined in Starting Strength: Basic Barbell Training, 3rd edition. When they ask for formchecks they’re asking to be checked against that model.

1 point

·

16th Sep 2021

Welcome to r/startingstrength, a subreddit for people following the Starting Strength Method outlines in Starting Strength: Basic Barbell Training, 3rd edition
.

You’ll want to read chapter 2, The Squat. Particularly the section starting on page 50 under the diagram of the adductors.

1 point

·

16th Sep 2021

Welcome to r/startingstrength, a subreddit for people following the Starting Strength Method outlines in Starting Strength: Basic Barbell Training, 3rd edition
.

You’ll want to read chapter 2, The Squat. Particularly the section starting on page 50 under the diagram of the adductors.

1 point

·

12th Sep 2021

Please see the About section in the sub for resources.

Here’s the primary Blue Book

Starting Strength

1 point

·

8th Sep 2021

Because he’s following the Starting Strength program, which calls for low bar. Out of curiosity, how did you stumble upon this subreddit, since I’m assuming you’re not familiar with Mark Rippetoe or the blue book?

1 point

·

11th May 2021

Stop doing lunges, buy the book, do the program, eat more.

Also dont waste your time seeing a doctor unless you’re trying to get an exemption from PE class or something.

1 point

·

1st Apr 2021

This is a starting strength sub… the advice here will be “quit doing what ever silly shit you’re doing now, read the book, and do the program.”

Your shoulders probably hurt because they’re weak and your form is bad. We have all been there. Fix your form and get strong

1 point

·

1st Oct 2020

A lot of good advice here; I’ll add my two cents. I recently started deadlifting for the first time too. To make sure I was doing them correctly I had purchased Mark Rippetoe’s Starting Strength: Basic Barbell Training and read the chapter on Deadlifts very carefully to understand the movement, the setup, all that jazz. It helped me a lot and it gave me a lot of confidence performing it. Later I watched some YouTube videos like were mentioned (Alan Thrall’s in particular) and it helped reinforce what I had read in the book. Good luck 🙂

1 point

·

27th Sep 2020

Hey, I develop the Starting Strength app and also coached people out of my home garage gym when I was living on the gold coast and did the coaching seminar over in Texas a few years back.

If you don’t mind lifting on the 19th floor on my balcony (have the rack and bar setup) I’d be happy to take you through the first 2 weeks of Starting Strength teaching you how to squat, deadlift, bench and overhead press safely using their methodology. If you’re worried about coming to a strangers place, no worries, feel free to bring a friend.

Once you’ve done that, you can pretty much continue by yourself at any gym that has a rack and bar and plates. And I’ll still be around if you want to get a form check now or again.

1 point

·

4th Aug 2020

>I’m a 30 year old 5’11”, 175~ lb male.
>
>My goals are simple. I want to not get out of breath when I run a mile, and I want to fill out a suit or business casual dress wear more aesthetically. I just don’t know where to start specifically.

Literally any program.

Starting Strength is good and simple

If you want to get better at cardio you just need to do more cardio.

1 point

·

4th Apr 2019

I can’t recommend Starting Strength highly enough. The book goes into detail about the what, how, why and when for each of the main lifts (squat, deadlift, bench press, press and power clean). It also covers programming and why the program works the way it does.

I definitely recommend the physical copy: https://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Basic-Barbell-Training/dp/0982522738/ref=sr_1_1?crid=1AVD36SFF914G&amp;keywords=starting+strength&amp;qid=1554400494&amp;s=gateway&amp;sprefix=starting%2Caps%2C164&amp;sr=8-1

Additionally, there’s Starting Strength Online Coaching if you want a virtual coach to program and form check for you. If you’re lucky (and want to do the program) there are plenty of Starting Strength coaches around the country.

1 point

·

23rd Dec 2018

Thank you for taking the time to put this together. I hope you’ll take these as constructive.

  1. I found it disappointing that you included exercises first rather than diet. Someone can do leg lifts or sit ups until their abs are on fire, but without the right diet they’ll never see their abs. I’d worked out for years including the exercises you demonstrated and still had stubborn belly fat until I straightened out my diet.
  2. The isolation exercises you demonstrated are a key component of what Martin calls “fuckarounditis.” When I trained with him, I did absolutely no isolation exercises—in fact my program was almost directly from Coach Rippetoe’s Starting Strength, which emphasizes compound movements that ultimately strengthen your core. The most helpful exercises I found were presses, squats, and power cleans.

So, apologies for raining on your parade, but I’m just being honest. I know vids like this take a long time to put together, and this one is put together really well. I just think your information could be better ordered (with diet first), and that your emphasis on isolation exercises isn’t especially helpful to people looking to see their abs for the first time.

1 point

·

9th Jun 2018

Gallon Of Milk A Day

It was originally popularized by Starting Strength

Good news: If you’re a beanpole 16 year old with raging hormones that wants to become an offensive lineman, this is PERFECT for getting some massive newb gains

Bad news: Most of us aren’t that, most of us will just get fat

If you’re 6’2″ and skinny and active enough, it could help I suppose.

1 point

·

15th May 2018

No this one

https://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Basic-Barbell-Training/dp/0982522738/ref=dp_ob_image_bk

It’s the current edition.

This book will tell you everything you need to know about starting to train. The squat chapter is 64 pages long and it will explain everything, foot position, angle, grip, where to put the bar… all of it. There’s also a starting strength channel on YouTube and you can see real time coaching. It’s hard to go it alone but I’m doing it to pretty great effect. At some point in the next month I’ll finally make an appointment with a SSC (starting strength coach) and get the issues with my form cleared up. It’ll be a couple hours drive but worth it.

1 point

·

28th Feb 2018
1 point

·

21st Dec 2017

Pah…uma pequena sugestão:

https://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Basic-Barbell-Training/dp/0982522738

(podes arranjar usado ou ver se “arranjas” na net)

É um livro com bastante reputação no forum Bodybuilding.com, onde te ensina MUITO detalhadamente a forma dos compostos (squat, bench press, deadlift, etc). É um treinador diferente dos outros, também tem videos na net, mas especializou-se durante anos mesmo a fundo na “anatomia” dos exercicios.

Claro que isto da forma “perfeita” não existe, cada expert diz a sua versão, mas eu li e gostei e aprende-se muito.

Depois sugeria-te, como já foi dito aí em cima, teres um amigo a filmar/criticar a tua forma em comparação com o livro (e outros vídeos).

Quanto a clínicas e isso, sorry, não sou grande entendido. Boa sorte 😉

PS: Eu pessoalmente sou anti-deadlift. Entendo que quem queira crescer “muito”, principalmente nos grupos musculares onde o deadlift toca e os outros não tocam, goste de o incluir. Eu não sou muito grande, já nem treino primariamente para hipertrofia, sou normal/magro, mas acho que o risco/beneficio deste exercicio é complicado…a não ser que garantas 99,9% das formas…e sinceramente, cuidado com PR’s a mais 🙂 Just my 2 cents, claro.

1 point

·

14th Nov 2017

// , My knees have finally stopped clicking, as of a few days ago.

Bulgarian split squats and step ups may finally have me ready to try Starting Strength Squats with real weight again.

https://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Basic-Barbell-Training/dp/0982522738

The most important gym equipment is between your ears.

Edit: Your muscle is the natural predator of your fat. Muscle will destroy fat’s ability to attack your mind.

1 point

·

1st Nov 2017

Starting Strength x a million. Even if you don’t plan on following the program, you should read the book before ever touching a barbell.

If you do decide to follow the program, nothing will get you stronger, faster. The most common criticism of the program is that there is no direct arm work. Rotate barbell curls, chin-ups, and lying triceps extensions as accessory movements after doing the 3 main lifts in each workout and boom, problem solved.

1 point

·

8th Oct 2017

If you don’t mind reading a few hundred pages, I wish I’d read Starting Strength when I was about 16 rather than when I was 34. Don’t treat it like the gospel, it’s very power-lifter centric (which is great if you want to be a powerlifter or football lineman; not so much if you just want to be strong, fit and look good at the beach without a huge belly). But the general overview of the major lifts, the biomechanics involved with them, and why they’re important, along with discussions of equipment etc, is really really valuable.

So read it, understand it, but then mold it to your personal goals (for example, if you’re trying to lose weight don’t drink a freaking gallon of milk a day =) and you might dial back the squats and increase the upper body accessory work if you want to worry about aesthetics)

1 point

·

19th Sep 2017

Regardless of goals, and based on your comment below about being a fast reader, track down a copy of Mark Rippetoe’s Starting Strength (link below). Sure if you dont want to spend the cash you can find a pdf somewhere, but you can get a kindle version for $10 and its valuable.

It will help you work out some basics and understanding of weigh training. As a beginner I wouldn’t recommend anything like 5/3/1, there isnt enough progression. You need a program with workout to workout or week to week linear progression. Your adaptation cycle will still be so short, so make the most of your time in the gym.

https://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Basic-Barbell-Training/dp/0982522738

Starting Strength 3×5 workout, or StrongLifts 5×5 will be a great starting place. The routines look boring / few exercises, but trust them. They are all you need at the moment. You will get stronger and bigger, but as a beginner you need to build up a good foundation.

Supplements arent as critical as a good diet. They “Supplement it” (funny that eh?). You need to be eating a solid calorific excess, but dont go to town. Get an app like “My fitness Pal” and enter your body weight, target body weight, and it will help you to calculate your required calorific intake.

Supplements:
Protein powder. 1.7-2g pf protein / kg of body weight daily. always.
Creatine 5g / day every day. one of the best backed supplements.
Pre-workout – only if you need it. Something with stims is helpful if you work out in the morning or feel lethargic, but the benefit is marginal, mostly psychological.

Be careful on your assumptions on Roids. I know some guys on riods, and some natty guys are just as big. Genetics play a big part in it. Dont sweat it. If you go into the area, no one will look down on you. They werent born big. They started at some stage too. They know it, and to be honest, they will be more impressed by you going into the free weights and lifting, more than if you kept to the machines.

1 point

·

13th Jul 2017
InfoDetails
Amazon ProductStarting Strength: Basic Barbell Training, 3rd edition

>Amazon donates 0.5% of the price of your eligible AmazonSmile purchases to the charitable organization of your choice. By using the link above you get to support a chairty and help keep this bot running through affiliate programs all at zero cost to you.

1 point

·

3rd Mar 2017

There are several books that will help you learn to understand why you do particular exercises, rather than just trusting a robot to teach you how to be a robot. A great place to start if you really don’t have any idea like you suggest, is Starting Strength.

1 point

·

15th Mar 2017

Check out Starting Strength (https://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Basic-Barbell-Training/dp/0982522738). Also, if you can afford it, 1-2 hours of training with a coach (a lot of gyms offer a free intro session) might help you get the basic movements down, then you can continue on your own.

1 point

·

21st Jan 2017

My friend, if you don’t work out already, please do. Get a gym membership in a gym which has a bunch of barbells and squat racks.

Buy and read Starting Strength. When you can deadlift twice your bodyweight for reps, come back here and update this post and tell us if you are still feeling lonely.

1 point

·

25th Oct 2016

I can recommend Rippetoe’s <em>Starting Strength: Basic Barbell Training</em> to gain an in-depth understanding on how to properly train for strength rather than hypertrophy.

It would then make sense to stringently follow the SS protocol (there’s an mobile app to steer and track progress as well) and not dabble in a variety of workout concoctions that mix up some fairly basic but proven SS principles with additional ideas that may or may not work. The ketogains protocol recommended around here falls into that category insofar it combines strength and hypertrophy objectives, which in my experience dilutes the outcomes sub-optimally for either and is, in your case, not really what you were asking for in the first place.

As you mention a stressful job and limited time, SS (when done to the letter) achieves maximum strength gains in the shortest possible timeframe.

1 point

·

22nd Sep 2016

The only reason why I asked about the blood sugar is because my Fasting Glucose always came back normal but my GP randomly threw on a A1C test when I first asked for a T level test and it was 6.0 (pre-diabetic) which was surprising for me since I have always been generally healhty and in shape. At this time I was about 20-25 pounds overweight but I wouldnt think thats enough to trigger pre-diabetes. I have kept my sugar inline ever since. A1C is always below 6. It may be unrelated to the while T issue stuff but im keeping an eye on how my glucose reacts if my T levels go back to normal.

I do highly encourage you to get back into working out. If you can go for strength training and lift weights and minimize cardio and go on a low carb high protein diet go for it.
Great Guide for Strength Training

Also recommend Beach Body Products like P90X and Body Beast.

Il def keep you informed. Il go for some more blood work probably around the end of December or early Jan as these things take time I suppose. Feel free to PM me as well im on reddit often.

1 point

·

14th Aug 2016

I’m not a swimmer or a firefighter but I dont see how getting some more muscle mass and strength could hinder you in either department. maybe somebody else can chime in on that. For a beginner program Starting Strength will be good for you.

1 point

·

24th Jun 2016

3 PRs this week!

145lb floor press – hit a bench/chest press PR couple weeks ago at 160

135lb push press – been stuck at 125 for months, think it was a mental block. I really struggle with overhead lifts. (bodyweight)

45lb pull up – used 10/10/25 plates. First time trying this.

Not PRs, but had some really good cleans this week. After reading Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe, my form/technique has gotten much better. Not finished reading it yet, really, really big book with lots of info.

1 point

·

16th Jun 2016

5×5 is a great body of training to do as maintenance or for beginners coming in looking to move up into heavier lifts.

But as a long term program, it lacks focus and intensity for advancing past intermediate gains. There are many programs you could use, Mark Rippetoe wrote an excellent book about strength training, I suggest you check it out.

Starting Strength

1 point

·

6th May 2016

>Machines…force the body to move the weight according to the design of the machine. This places some rather serious limitations on the ability of the exercise to meet the specific needs of the athlete. For instance, there is no way for a human being to utilize the quadriceps muscles in isolation from the hamstrings in any movement pattern that exists independently of a machine designed for this purpose. No natural movement can be performed that does this. Quadriceps and hamstrings always function together, at the same time, to balance the forces on either side of the knee. Since they always work together, why should they be exercised separately? Because somebody invented a machine that lets us?

Rippetoe, Mark (2013-11-07). Starting Strength (Kindle Locations 181-188). The Aasgaard Company. Kindle Edition.

1 point

·

24th Feb 2016

Have you skimmed through the wiki? Tons of great resources there. A lot of people will suggest this:

http://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Basic-Barbell-Training/dp/0982522738

and it’s a well respected resource, but to be honest most of its material can be found for free online 🙂

1 point

·

7th Dec 2015

I found the book Starting Strength to be really helpful.
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0982522738?keywords=startomg%20strength&amp;qid=1449465618&amp;ref_=sr_1_sc_1&amp;sr=8-1-spell
It’s got plenty of pictures and clear instructions to guide you through.

1 point

·

2nd Dec 2015
  1. Lifting for strength development is going to be your best bet, which means somewhere in the range of 1-5 reps, for 3-5 sets. I would recommend using a beginner’s program like Starting Strength which focuses on big, compound movements. The program is three days a week, usually finished in around 45 minutes.

  2. Never stop walking, even on lifting days. If you are short on time, walk on your non-lifting days. Walking is the best thing for you and it will help you recover from lifting.

  3. Whether or not something counts as lifting sorta depends on how much you can do. If you can only do 5 sets of 5 sit-ups or 5 sets of 5 push-ups, then yes, I’d consider it “lifting” since you are in the range for strength development. If you can do more than 10 reps, you will have to add resistance. This is where lifting weights will benefit you since you can add weights in a linear manner, keeping within the necessary range.

Good luck!

1 point

·

7th Jul 2015

In addition to the 5×5 recommendation I suggest you picking up a copy of Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe.

It breaks down the science of the heavy lifts with easy to comprehend pictures. The programming is solid and I made significant strength gains prior to tweaking it to fit my personal needs.

You are pretty weak so don’t be surprised when your lifts grow significantly then sputter out around month 3. Beginner gains are impressive and continual improvement through specific programming is key to long term success.

1 point

·

26th Jul 2015

hit up the squat, deadlift and bench 3x a week. Do warmup exercises with the bar and then do 3×5 at your ability level.

But get this and read it first: http://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-3rd-Mark-Rippetoe/dp/0982522738

You’re a novice so you’ll start low weight and be able to add about 5-10lbs per week on the bar.

Bodyweight exercises are overrated. If you want strength, you gotta lift heavy.

1 point

·

18th Jul 2015

Congratulations on starting your fitness journey – that’s a huge step!

Typically, it is recommended that you cut (or eat at a deficit to lose weight) down to the weight that you desire before you start bulking (eating more to gain muscle). If you just started, however, it is possible to build muscle and lose weight simultaneously for a period. Just wanted to include his tidbit.

Now to the actual question. Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe (http://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-3rd-Mark-Rippetoe/dp/0982522738) is one routine/book that people, especially beginners, tend to love and experienced lifters also endorse. That is more than likely your best place to start. Later on, people often switch to a “split” that cycles through days of chest/triceps, back/biceps, and legs/shoulders. You can always look up exercises for these groups on bodybulding.com and pick ones that seem fun or interesting to you!

The most important thing to remember is that the best routine is one that you stick with. Try to pick something that you actually enjoy doing and you will find that the gym becomes one of your favorite parts of the day!

Hope this helps! Good luck!

1 point

·

20th Jul 2015

Agree that Starting Strength is the book you want. To make it easy, here’s a link to the 3rd (current) edition. Also, don’t get the Kindle version as the book is very diagram heavy and this does not look very good on the Kindle.

1 point

·

3rd Jun 2015

If you have any issues with form for any of the exercises you are doing, buy the book Starting Strength. http://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-3rd-Mark-Rippetoe/dp/0982522738

Read the appropriate chapters. You will not find better explanations of how to perform the lifts properly.

It is an amazing breakdown of biomechanics in relation to lifting heavy weights into the air.

1 point

·

14th Jun 2015

> I left out these details simply because they were so minor that I didn’t think I needed to discuss them.

There is no such thing as a minor detail. 😛

Pretty much the definitive resource for barbell training is Starting Strength. It’s written specifically for someone who doesn’t have or want a trainer or spotter. It has very thorough and in-depth discussions of proper mechanics and form, as well as offering insight into basic programming. It’s probably the best money you’ll ever spend, fitness-wise.

If you really want a trainer, figure out what federation regulates Olympic weightlifting in your country, and go on their website and locate some weightlifting clubs near you. Call them up and ask them if they offer lessons in the basic barbell movements, particularly the squat, deadlift, and overhead press. Not all do, but some will. Some of the weightlifting clubs will actually be Crossfit gyms, and while not all Crossfit gyms are good (some are downright terrible), the ones that host weightlifting clubs are almost always excellent.

1 point

·

14th Jun 2015

Nah bro that’s what /r/gainit is for. This is where I started, it’s my way of giving back.

Warm up by doing the same exercise but at lighter weights, increasingly getting heavier.

EX: You squat 150. So you do 45(bar)-75-95-115-135-workset3X5at150. You don’t have to follow that exactly, just do what feels right. Do at least 4 warm up sets, but you can stretch it up to like 8 if you feel the need. You’ll feel it once your body switches into gear. Your work sets are supposed to be hard, if you don’t need to rest for at least 2 minutes between them you aren’t pushing yourself hard enough.

Once it’s time to switch exercises, you may feel you don’t need to warm up as much, but you should still do a set or two at lower weight ranges just to practices your form and get your blood flowing where you need it to. You’ll feel it all out.

So:
1-5 warm up sets working your way up to a difficult 3 worksets of 5. Except deadlifts – do extra warm up sets and finish off your workout with one set of five. Think of warming up like practice before the real thing.

EDIT: this book is a great resource. Everything I’m saying to you is based off of it.

1 point

·

2nd May 2015

SQUATS!!! If you are interested http://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-3rd-Mark-Rippetoe/dp/0982522738 is an absolutely fantastic resource for learning how to do a lot of the basic exercises properly. (Dude spends like 50 pages on proper squat form – and it is totally useful.)

1 point

·

5th May 2015

Starting Strength is one of the best references out there, it spends a fair amount of time explaining the reasons why exercises are done in a certain way before it gets into the exercises themselves. Has a section for each lift on how to spot and correct mistakes, because you can’t learn it all at once. I am currently doing the Stronglifts 5×5 program because I didn’t want to buy a book to get started, and it’s similar but doesn’t have as high a quality of information as SS. The web site also reads like a late-night infomercial at times. I would have just bought the damn book if I were to do it over.

The best program is one you can stick to. I’ve lifted on and off in the past, but I’ve been at it for the last 2 months consistently, and the desire to keep improving is a great motivator.

1 point

·

1st May 2015

If you’re looking for where to begin Starting Strength is a great resource and explains all main lifts in detail. If there are other specific questions you have let me know I’ll try to point you in the right direction.

1 point

·

20th May 2015

I’ve been trying to read a lot more. Most times the books pertain to a hobby or work. Right now I’m learning how to lift. Other books were things about finances, how to manage my time, or how to organize. I figure it would improve my life one way or another.

1 point

·

15th Mar 2015

Because you are not eating and don’t know what you are doing.

My estimation is that you are still untrained, so stop what you are doing and start with a novice program aka Starting Strength and eat above your TDEE. Once you have have hit a plateau then you can try a more advanced program.

Take the time and read this book http://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-3rd-Mark-Rippetoe/dp/0982522738

1 point

·

18th Mar 2015

No worries man, everyone starts somewhere. I was a swimmer, when I started lifting everything was outta whack for me too. I recommend reading Starting Strength if you’re looking for info on muscle groups, proper exercise motions and stuff!

1 point

·

2nd Feb 2015

Saw that someone else commented this, but I want to second that Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe is the way to go. A lot of people, trainers included are going to tell you a lot different things, and its hard to filter through all the bullshit. This book will teach you the fundamental principles behind simple, basic exercises, and rippetoe’s methods are universally respected. If someone tells you this book/program isn’t good, they are an idiot. If you have any questions or anything about it, or working out in general, happy to help.

1 point

·

6th Feb 2015

i used to squat and deadlift on a smith machine…at planet fitness…BUT i’ve changed!! i’m now reading this book and i curse smith machines now! all hail broscience! please don’t hurt me

In other news i’m happy my deadlift max is 270 though =D (not on a smith machine)

1 point

·

2nd Feb 2015

There are a lot of good programs and tutorials to help you out and everyone has their own preference.

I started with Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe (it’s expensive new, find a used copy). Don’t just follow the program, read the actual book itself. It goes in depth into every lift, what it’s doing for you, etc. There are other programs based off this one, but copying the program without reading the reasoning behind it isn’t useful for a beginner.

Others will have their own recommendations but starting strength did wonders for me and my buddy who got me into lifting, after a while you’ll understand what you’re doing and be able to switch things up.

edit: http://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-3rd-Mark-Rippetoe/dp/0982522738

You can download the kindle version to your PC to get it cheap, or find a used version or PDF if you have no moral qualms about it.

1 point

·

19th Jan 2015

Starting Strength

If you just try to lose weight now without also lifting, you will lose muscle and it is going to be that much harder to gain muscle later on. Plus the more muscle you the more calories you will burn. Forget the treadmill and hit the free weights.

1 point

·

6th Jan 2015

This is a program that is commonly talked about on here, and mentioned in the FAQ/Wiki/Sidebar.

It talks about the warmup sets directly in the program. it says to do them in addition to your working sets (3×5). Read the whole thing.

It also talks about progression in the program.

If you’re a complete newbie, I’d really recommend reading the FAQ/Wiki and getting the book for this program if you’re gonna follow it:

http://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-3rd-Mark-Rippetoe/dp/0982522738

1 point

·

13th Jan 2015

Weightlifting is a great safe way to get exercise, especially to set good foundations. Starting Strength, as the title implies, is a good book to start with. It can be a bit technical, but it’s nice to learn how your body works so you can make it stronger and lessen the probability of getting injured.

It can take a while for the positive physiologic / psycological effects of exercise to occur I think. For me it’s when I’m no longer concentrating on what I’m learning and just lose myself in it. Once I get in the groove of things it’s a nice way to escape the world and it acts as a stress relieve.

As I understand you don’t have to avoid all salts, and the amount that people need vary greatly. The main thing I think is if there are indicators it’s hurting you, like high blood pressure. If you’re eating unpackaged foods you won’t get much salt and can add some. However many preserved foods (canned, frozen, etc) already come with enough salt nutritionally.

You can also keep your cholesterol low without being vegan. If you have other reasons it’s fine to be vegan, just a bit more restricting in food choices. Lean meats like fish and chicken breast are fine. Salmon has “good fat”. Olive oil isn’t bad for you and with some salt may get a flavor that you like back. It will have calories to watch our for, but it’s pretty flavorful and could help as you get towards maintenance level calories.

1 point

·

1st Jan 2015

> Do you (or anyone) know where I could find quality information of that type (the more detailed and accurate, the better) ?

Behold the 8000 MMR Guidebook for Fitness.

tl;dr Learn to squat.

1 point

·

4th Jun 2013

Check this book out. I think /r/fitness has a lot of good things to say about this program as well. Just 3 compound exercises so it doesn’t take a lot of time. I just started it.

http://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-3rd-Mark-Rippetoe/dp/0982522738/ref=sr_1_sc_1?ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1370334846&amp;sr=8-1-spell&amp;keywords=startomg+strength

1 point

·

5th Feb 2012

FUCK COUNTING CALORIES.

r/keto. Do it. Lost 15lbs in 5 weeks doing that and lifting. 250-235.

You never have to count calories.

Current 3 favorite meals:

  • Bacon Wrapped Jerk Chicken w/ Sauteed Veggies
  • Steak w/ Bacon Wrapped Asparagus
  • Moink Balls (Meatballs stuffed with cheese and wrapped in bacon).

Carbs are bad. Fat is good!

1 point

·

21st Feb 2012

Not going to recount all the advice here, and it all seems good. Just wanted to pass this on. Buy this book, it’s a great resource for the basics of weight training.

http://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-3rd-Mark-Rippetoe/dp/0982522738/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1329850455&amp;sr=8-1

Good luck!

1 point

·

9th Dec 2011

I’ve never thought any gizmo has helped me lose weight.

See if you can find a good book on exercise or nutrition, but I’d suggest this although it is out of your price range by $10. Maybe find a used copy somewhere.

18 points

·

6th Oct 2018

Bought this book today; Starting Strength Basic Barbell Training, 3rd edition
. I’m excited to receive it on Sunday and enhance my lifting.

12 points

·

2nd Aug 2018

OP, you have received some advice on this thread that isn’t great (e.g. don’t worry about not squatting to depth).

I am an actual strength coach. For years, I’ve coached old people, kids, middle aged business people, mothers of four, underweight males, obese people, college kids…you get the idea. I have yet to meet a single person for whom mobility is a restricting issue in the first session (i.e. can’t squat due to tight <insert muscle here>) except for the shoulders, which can generally be opened up within a few sessions. Even holding for shoulders only, I’ve only had three people that couldn’t low bar on their first day with acceptable wrist neutrality. Here’s my advice to you.

  1. buy the book, and read it. This will be the most useful thing for you to do as you begin this process. As you do this, you’re going to get a lot of people that are going to question you as to why you’re doing what you’re doing, and this book gives a very solid base of information to respond from.
  2. Unless you’re 6’10”, you’re fairly overweight. Don’t crash diet; it will make you feel crappy and it will disrupt your strength training. Plus, I don’t want you in a huge deficit because I need some energy for training. Find a point with a reasonable calorie deficit, and stick there. All you’re looking for is gradual fat loss. Be aware that as you add muscle, you may not see the scale move every week. Do measurements before you start so that you have some metric to check progress with.
  3. Commit to some GPP a few times a week, but be aware that it will probably make you hungry, and you’ll be in danger of eating back more calories than you burned. We’re not looking for anything like 90 minutes on a treadmill here. More like 15 minutes on the prowler sled or 20 minutes on a stair master or 30 on a bike.
  4. Find and hire a qualified coach for a few sessions. I cannot stress this enough. You can learn yourself and do well, but you will waste a lot of time with things like worrying about butt wink and mobility and a lot of stuff that will waste your time. A qualified coach can fix butt wink (to the extent that it needs to be fixed) in a session or two, and help mitigate fears about what you’re doing right and what you’re doing wrong.
  5. Train! You will find that a multitude of issues resolve themselves as you get stronger. Here’s one stretch that I do use and find to be useful with new trainees.

Good luck. If you do this for a year you’ll look back and wonder how you lived without it.

5 points

·

27th Feb 2021

There is a classic weightlifting and compound barbell book starting strength by Mark Rippetoe that made a huge difference in my form

4 points

·

29th Jul 2020

https://startingstrength.com/
And specifically the book Starting Strength: Basic Barbell Training. 5 star score with over 2000 reviews on amazon. The book is about 2cm thick (if you get a physical version) and goes into insane depth on the mechanics of the lifts you need, in terms of reasons for the lifts and the program and the biomechanics and crucially the WHY as well as the HOW. The squat chapter alone is 70 pages, for ONE squat.

I can’t speak to any of the other online options but I can personally attest to the effectiveness of the program. I know exactly what I’m doing and why and don’t get sidelined wasting time on less effective training than I need to make me strong.

I have no personal stake here, other than wanting to share the resources I’ve had great success with.

3 points

·

31st Jul 2020

My 4+ reread was The Great Mental Models(blog) Vol 1 & Vol 2

> The quality of our thinking is proportional to the models in our head and their usefulness in the situation at hand. The more models you have—the bigger your toolbox—the more likely you are to have the right models to see reality. It turns out that when it comes to improving your ability to make decisions variety matters.

Also Starting Strength

u/brokester

2 points

·

6th Jul 2021

So improve yourself. You already know what you need to work on, you just need to figure out how to do it.

1 – Unless you’re just an asshole, you probably don’t have a terrible personality. I’m guessing from the other stuff you said that you just think that you’re uninteresting. Honestly, if you have no hobbies then that may be the case, but like, I’m assuming you don’t just sit around starting at a wall all day? Video games, reading, or watching tv can all be hobbies. If you want more “interesting” hobbies, then there’s plenty of stuff you can pick up. If there are salsa or swing dance lessons in your area, that’s a great hobby. Especially since it forces you to interact with more people. It’s super terrifying to start though since you’ll think you’re terrible at it. Once you actually go to a class, you’ll realize that everyone is pretty terrible though since they wouldn’t be in class if they already knew how to dance. You rotate partners constantly in class, so you don’t have to bring anyone with you or anything.

2/3 – These are almost certainly false. If not, then that’s an issue with your parents and not you.

4 – The level of attractiveness of a guy is like 80% confidence and 20% looks. Obviously, you don’t have that confidence currently but at least you can improve that. And really, even for the 20% looks, about half of that is just being in shape. If you’re not already going to the gym you should start. Mostly because it helps a ton with confidence for some reason, but it also has the side effect of getting you in shape too. So even if you have the ugliest face on earth, you can still be a nine out of ten if you’re confident and in shape. Going to the gym and first can also be terrifying, but people at the gym actually love seeing people who aren’t in shape get into shape. There’s a great book called Starting Strength that can teach you all of the basics of strength training.

5 – Same thing as 4, it’s mostly all confidence. Also, while some girls do care about height, they only care that you’re taller than them for the most part. There are a ton of girls who are shorter than 5’5.

6 – This could be an actual disorder where you need a psychologist to help out with. Strength training can also help a bit because you really need to eat a ton to gain muscle. Really though, if it’s serious, you should see a psychologist.

7 – Start working on yourself so that you don’t miss the next milestones. You need to like yourself before you’ll let other people like you. 18 isn’t really that much of your life. My “party years” were like 25-35.

8 – Same as 4. Confidence is what you need to work on. Unfortunately, confidence is pretty difficult to improve, but you can definitely do it. Also, you could shave your head or I think there are some hair products that actually work pretty well for regrowing hair?

9 – Do you work out 3-4 days a week? If not, you’re probably not in your physical prime yet. There are also tons of videos of 70+ year olds in their physical prime, so it’s obviously not all downhill.

10 – Maybe reddit is wrong. Maybe you’re just missing some fundamental piece.

11 / 12 – Education really builds on itself. Like, imagine learning calculus when you don’t know basic multiplication. It’s impossible. If you’re failing, then you probably missed something early on and it makes everything else difficult to learn. It’s a ton of work, but you really have to sit down and ask yourself what you don’t understand about a problem. Then research that thing. Sometimes that just leads to multiple other things that you don’t understand and it just kind of spiderwebs out until you’re learning a ton. Everything starts making sense once figure out all the building blocks of a particular piece of knowledge though. There are TONS of great youtube videos out there for learning specific topics too.

13 – Literally no one at college will know or care that you missed a semester.

14 – If you don’t care about sex then why is it shameful? Some people are more asexual than others. If you’re truly asexual, it will probably make dating a bit more difficult, but dating is really just finding someone that’s compatible with you. So if you let people know, then you’ll be able to find someone who’s cool with that.

15 – This isn’t really a fault. Just don’t let people take advantage of you.

16 – I’m sure you do something. If you want different interests or hobbies, there’s a ton of stuff that you can just go do. Want to learn to dance? Dance classes. Want to learn to program? Google that or ask for help on reddit. Think living in the woods for like a week is for you? There’s survival instructors and tons of info online. Writing stories, drawing, poetry? Easily found info for how to get started online.

17 / 18 – This is just a lack of confidence showing. A common pattern I’ve seen with people is that they’ll start something new, “fuck it up”, and then give up. The piece of info that they’re missing is that everyone who starts something new fucks it up at the beginning. Like, soccer super starts don’t just see a soccer ball and are magically great at it. They suck at first and then practice a shit ton. Honestly, when people are great at something it generally just means that they enjoy practicing it. It’s pretty rare that someone is just going to be like “I’m going to force myself to be a soccer superstar even though I hate soccer”. Even when that happens those people generally end up hating their lives. So basically, keep trying hobbies until you find something that you enjoy fucking up.

19 – This is just a lack of social skills. You can actually learn a lot of that online too. There’s a great “book” called The Book of Pook that goes into a lot of dating advice that can apply to social skills too. You can also google for tips about “banter”. Just be careful because there’s also a lot of terrible advice out there. Anything that ever tells you to insult someone else or act like you’re better than someone else is pure garbage and will set you back. Also, conversations are a lot easier when you have a hobby that you like and are willing to talk about.

20 – Honestly, a lot of this could be in your head. A big part of having low self confidence is that you think people don’t like you and you end up creating terrible situations for yourself because of it. I had low self confidence until after college and now, when I look back at those years, it’s painful how many missed opportunities I had. Like, girls would be flirting with me super hard and I would be sitting there wondering why girls didn’t like me.

21 – You’re strong enough to keep going. 18 years is nothing in the grand scheme of life. Having it tough early on just means that you have so much room for improvement, and will actually learn how to improve yourself. That’s not a skill that everyone has. There are people that have it super easy in high school but then when they hit the real world they just fail and have no idea how to improve themselves because they never had to before.

You got this. Don’t “just be yourself”, be the best version of yourself that you can be. Don’t change for anyone else. Change for yourself.

Let me know if you want any more details or recommendations on how to go about improving yourself. It’s all terrifying at first.

2 points

·

10th Feb 2021

Bueno:

  1. Te sugiero que levantes pesas de acuerdo a un programa atletico conocido. Aunque muchos diran que la fuerza no es necesaria para el Judo (Falso), la fuerza si es un requisito para cierto movimientos y para prevenir lesiones. Este libro ha servido muchos en como entrenarse en levantar pesas:
    1. https://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Basic-Barbell-Training/dp/0982522738
  2. Te recomiendo que saltes cuerdas/quica/soga (como quera que uds. en ESP lo digan). Asi vas a empezar a mejorar to capacidad y vas a aprender como mantenerte ‘leve.’
  3. Debes leer libros de Judo para aprender la terminologia. Desafortunadamente, los que conozco muy bien estan escritos en ingles:
    1. https://www.amazon.es/Kodokan-Throwing-Techniques-Toshiro-Daigo/dp/1568365772/ref=sr_1_1?__mk_es_ES=%C3%85M%C3%85%C5%BD%C3%95%C3%91&amp;dchild=1&amp;keywords=judo+kodokan&amp;qid=1612992087&amp;sr=8-1
    2. https://www.amazon.es/Judo-Unleashed-Neil-Ohlenkamp/dp/0071475346/ref=sr_1_1?__mk_es_ES=%C3%85M%C3%85%C5%BD%C3%95%C3%91&amp;dchild=1&amp;keywords=judo+unleashed&amp;qid=1612992144&amp;sr=8-1

Finalmente, como es que esos chicos son “toxicos?”

2 points

·

19th Jan 2017

No problem on the stalking, haha.

Those are good questions about lifting. I’ve also done a lot of googling on the topic and come away frustrated. I started about 3.5 years ago, and I train mostly for strength. Overall, I think it’s been a good thing for my scoliosis. It can be frustrating – lifting is harder when you don’t have a straight spine supporting the weight. I’ve been able to get decently strong and continue to make progress, though (495×1 deadlift, 335×5 squat, and 210ish bench). All my lifts continue to go up each week, although I have had injuries and tweaks along the way. I can’t say if it’s due to my scoliosis or not, so I just deal with them and keep training.

I think the way scoliosis will impact lifting will be a little different for everyone since everyone’s curves are unique. For the most part, I can perform the lifts with minimal modifications. Bench is hard for me because my right shoulder comes out at a weight angle due to my thoracic curve, but I’m still able to get stronger.

I think lifting has made my curves less noticeable, but it’s really hard to say. Ultimately, a body with muscle on it is going to look better than one without, and being stronger is going to be better than being weaker. I do struggle with body image issues with the scoliosis from time to time, and lifting has been very helpful for that. I have a lot more confidence, both from having muscle and from knowing that I’m stronger than most other guys walking around on the street.

Are you familiar with the Starting Strength program? I would highly recommend that program. It’s a basic barbell program, and it’s the most effective way to get stronger. There’s a large community on the starting strength forums, which is a great place to ask for advice and post form checks. There are a lot of things grouped under “Starting Strength”: “the program” I just mentioned, the methods of executing the lifts, weekend seminars put on by Mark Rippetoe, a coaching certification, an app, an online coaching service, and a series of books. Sometimes starting strength gets flack from bros online, but I would ignore that. Just go to the forums and look at people’s training logs – you’ll see some big numbers achieved relatively quickly.

The 2 big things for success in the gym are proper form and adhering to a program without giving up or adding stuff to it. For form, the best thing you can do is find an “SSC” (Starting Strength Coach) near you and schedule a training session. They’ll teach you how to perform the lifts safely in accordance with the SS model, along with any modifications you might need to make due to your scoliosis. For example, with a lumbar curve, you may have an effective leg length discrepancy and need to shim one of your shoes. They’ll be able to tell you that. They’ll also be able to help you get started on the novice program.

To find a coach, you can look here: http://startingstrength.org/index.php/site/coaches

Rippetoe himself also puts on seminars, which I mentioned, which you can find a list of here: http://startingstrength.com/coaching/seminars

I also mentioned the starting strength books. The first one to read is “Starting Strength: Basic Barbell Training” (abbreviated as SSBBT). You can get it on amazon here: https://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Basic-Barbell-Training/dp/0982522738. This book covers how to perform the lifts, and briefly talks about the novice program toward the end. The book is very dense, and I wouldn’t recommend reading it cover to cover at first. I’d read the “how to” parts for each lift first, then go back and fill in the blanks.

The next book is “Practical Programming for Strength Training” (https://www.amazon.com/Practical-Programming-Strength-Training-Rippetoe/dp/0982522754). This covers how to structure a training program. It goes into more detail on the novice program, then lays out different types of intermediate and advanced programming. This one isn’t as essential to order right away – you can find the general novice program here: https://www.t-nation.com/training/most-lifters-are-still-beginners (scroll down to “The Program”).

I guess that was a long response. Hopefully this info is helpful for you or anyone in the future who might find this thread. Feel free to PM me if you have any questions. Depending on your location, I may be able to recommend a coach or gym. I wish I knew all of this when I was your age, so don’t hesitate to get in touch.

2 points

·

6th Jul 2018

Your local library probably has it, but here’s the Amazon: Starting Strength: Basic Barbell Training, 3rd edition https://www.amazon.com/dp/0982522738/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_TtTpBbN73JKVF

2 points

·

23rd Jun 2020

I have to 2nd the Starting Strength Program as well as the “Quick Guide” on this sub. Starting Strength is a very simple program that WILL make you stronger and help you increase your muscle mass. Best place to start get the book on Amazon – it will change your life. Follow the book TO THE LETTER. Congrats on the great success!

There’s reason its always first in Health and Fitness on Amazon.

https://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Basic-Barbell-Training/dp/0982522738/ref=sr_1_2?crid=T67UDFU896N4&amp;dchild=1&amp;keywords=starting+strength+basic+barbell+training+3rd+edition&amp;qid=1592935433&amp;sprefix=starting+st%2Caps%2C176&amp;sr=8-2

2 points

·

12th Oct 2016

> Got any advice?

That’s a difficult topic because every persons back has different needs. I will try to give you a short overview:

My story is as follows: I had a prolapsed disc and did physical therapy until it was ok (I live in Germany so that stuff is free / cheap). After ~2 years I had my second prolapsed disc and I got physical therapy again. My trainer told me that I had very weak core muscles and that I should train them in order to avoid any more issues.

I found a gym in which one of the trainers specialized on lower back problems. He created a strength program for me which I used for half a year. Since it involved only machines I got bored and switched to free weights and did more or less the classic “Starting Strength” program with some individual tweaks: https://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Basic-Barbell-Training/dp/0982522738/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1476280596&amp;sr=8-1&amp;keywords=mark+rippetoe That book is a classic and it is often recommended over in /r/fitness.

Nowadays I am more into bodyweight exercises because I currently can not afford to join the gym. The sub /r/bodyweightfitness is really great and they have a good beginner routine (Have a look in the sidebar). There is one guy called Antranik in that sub who puts out good Youtube Videos and he has his own website: http://antranik.org/

In addition I started to do Yoga but I haven’t found something which I really like yet.

So all in all you have 4-ish options which you can mix if you like:

  • weight training in the gym involving machines. This is good in the beginning if your body is not used to this type of exercise.

  • weight training using free weights at the gym or at home. This is a bit more advanced but much more interesting

  • bodyweightfitness at home. This does not cost any money but you will still have great results

  • yoga. you can do that either in some sort of yoga club or you follow some youtube videos at home.

If you want to understand (lower) back problems you should have a look at this book: https://www.amazon.com/Back-Disorders-Second-Stuart-McGill/dp/0736066926/ref=la_B001IGNPB6_1_1?s=books&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1476280332&amp;sr=1-1 It explains in all details what’s going wrong and it talks about good and bad exercises. It is mainly written for doctors and other professionals so it is a bit dry. There is another book from him which is aimed towards the normal user but I have not read it yet: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0973501804/ref=pd_sim_14_1?ie=UTF8&amp;pd_rd_i=0973501804&amp;pd_rd_r=AKDJECK2FQN38KG5PBJF&amp;pd_rd_w=ZstIN&amp;pd_rd_wg=RPCYf&amp;psc=1&amp;refRID=AKDJECK2FQN38KG5PBJF (If you don’t want to read it I can give you the spoiler: Your core muscles are weak and you should train them!)

tldr: Your core muscles support and brace your spine. If they are weak then your spine does not have support and you will have backproblems. In addition your desk job will also fuck up your back because of your posture and the fact that you don’t move.

WARNING: whatever you are doing, do it slooooooow and don’t overload your back! If it hurts then stop doing the current exercise. It will take a while until you figure out what you can and can’t do.

WARNING 2: before doing anything you should also talk to your doctor

2 points

·

23rd Oct 2015

There is no activity on the planet, from getting up out of bed, to gymnastics, to BJJ, that doesn’t benefit from a base of strength–period. Being stronger means sudden bursts of force, whether against you or generated by you, will be more manageable. And that’s important because that’s generally when injury occurs.

If you’ve ever watched a World’s Strongest Man competition, you know that these guys are doing some insane poundages. For you, flipping a 500lb tire may take everything out of you. 1 flip is basically your max. However, for the strongmen, their base strength is so high that flipping a 500lb tire becomes an endurance event. Think of the event where they run with cars strapped their shoulders! I would be lucky to lift the car from the floor, let alone do shit with it for time.

Not trying to make /r/fitness or /r/powerlifting leak over here, but I recommend picking up a copy of Starting Strength and understand the tried and true benefits of progressive strength training. It’s not about getting bulbous pecs, nor is about listening to death metal and growing a beard. Powerlifting is about being stronger–period–on your own terms. Don’t want to eat 4,000 calories a day and get a huge gut? That’s fine! You’ll work CNS-based strength like this 170lb kid who can deadlift almost 600 lbs.. Forgive the shit music. And before you talk about “form”, know that everyone’s form degrades to a degree when they’re working at 95%+ of their max. But, as you’ll learn if you read Starting Strength, having a strong base with correct form means your body is less likely to completely collapse when form is suboptimal. You can picture many compromising positions in BJJ where force generation is compromised. Strength training will help to a degree.

As a powerlifter, I know more about the “S” side of “S&C”. As far as I’m concerned, most on this sub are more than conditioned enough for BJJ by doing it and rolling regularly. If anything, the “S” part is where folks fall down.

In Beyond 5/3/1 (my fav style of training), Wendler has a 2-day routine, and that’s what I follow. My schedule looks like:

Week 1

Mon – Deadlift + Accessories

Tue – BJJ

Wed – Bench + Accessories

Thur/Fri – BJJ

Sat/Sun – Rest

Week 2

Mon – Squat + Accessories

Tue – BJJ

Wed – OHP + Accessories

Thur/Fri – BJJ

Sat/Sun – Rest

So on and so forth. I used to lift 4 days a week, then 3 days a week, and now 2. Guess what? I’m still getting stronger. I’m uninjured, I listen to my body, and I recover just fine.

If you’re really interested in getting stronger, you’ll have to tackle it in the same way you approach BJJ: with discipline, curiosity, and consistency. Definitely get a book or use an app to track workouts. Watch form videos the way you watch technique vids. And if you have any questions, feel free to PM me.

2 points

·

22nd Sep 2015

SS refers to Mark Rippetoe’s book “Starting Strength”

you can find it on amazon here: http://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-3rd-Mark-Rippetoe/dp/0982522738

SL refers to StrongLifts, a similar program buy a guy named Mehdi

you can find more info on his site here: http://stronglifts.com/

There are online posts and rips or Rippetoe’s book, but I’d feel bad linking to them so you can google it. Even if you don’t want to follow the SS program its a great read.

2 points

·

18th Sep 2015

Why Barbells?

>The primary reason for this was that Nautilus equipment allowed the health club (at the time known as the “health spa”) industry to offer to the general public a thing which had been previously unavailable. Prior to the invention of Nautilus, if a member wanted to train hard, in a more elaborate way than Universal equipment permitted, he had to learn how to use barbells. Someone had to teach him this. Moreover, someone had to teach the health spa staff how to teach him this. Such professional education was, and still is, time-consuming and not widely available. But with Nautilus equipment, a minimum-wage employee could be taught very quickly how to use the whole circuit, ostensibly providing a total-body workout with little invested in employee education. Furthermore, the entire circuit could be performed in about 30 minutes, thus decreasing member time on the exercise floor, increasing traffic capacity in the club, and maximizing sales exposure to more traffic. Nautilus equipment quite literally made the existence of the modern health club possible.

>The problem, of course, is that machine-based training did not work as it was advertised. It was almost impossible to gain muscular bodyweight doing a circuit. People who were trying to do so would train faithfully for months without gaining any significant muscular weight at all. When they switched to barbell training, a miraculous thing would happen: they would immediately gain – within a week – more weight than they had gained in the entire time they had fought with the 12-station circuit.

>The reason that isolated body part training on machines doesn’t work is the same reason that barbells work so well, better than any other tools we can use to gain strength. The human body functions as a complete system – it works that way, and it likes to be trained that way. It doesn’t like to be separated into its constituent components and then have those components exercised separately, since the strength obtained from training will not be utilized in this way. The general pattern of strength acquisition must be the same as that in which the strength will be used. The nervous system controls the muscles, and the relationship between them is referred to as “neuromuscular.” When strength is acquired in ways that do not correspond to the patterns in which it is intended to actually be used, the neuromuscular aspects of training have not been considered. Neuromuscular specificity is an unfortunate reality, and exercise programs must respect this principle the same way they respect the Law of Gravity.

Rippetoe, Mark (2013-11-07). Starting Strength (Kindle Locations 163-170). The Aasgaard Company. Kindle Edition.

2 points

·

15th Apr 2015

Trainers can be great but they can also be really expensive. If you are completely set on getting one, go for it. If not you could also try this.

Use this to pick a program

Get the cheapest gym membership you can that allows you do to such a program.

Start light, focus on form, and post your vids to /r/fitness when you have an issue.

If you want a comprehensive guide to barbell lifts, buy the starting strength book by Mark Rippetoe. It’s really good and lays everything out. Some people have issues with some of his techniques and as you learn you may choose to do things a little differnt but this is a really good place to start.

If you have added concern about mobility or form you should check out everything by Kelly Starrett. He also owns and runs San Francisco Cross Fit in the presidio and they have an awesome olympic lifting club.

1 point

·

24th Apr 2022

Starting Strength: Basic Barbell Training, 3rd edition https://www.amazon.com/dp/0982522738/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apan_i_H09RE9ZD8V9GZ7D6QZ7H

1 point

·

26th Mar 2022
1 point

·

17th Mar 2022

>Everyone just makes fun of me and says I’m ugly and got a small dick

How many people have seen your erect penis? I mean, not after you just got out of the swimming pool https://youtu.be/ldUZvxjKMGs?t=74, but when you’re really excited?

Women care a *lot* less about looks (within limits) than men do, and the things they care about are MUCH easier to fix.

>guy who has no track record and how will I ever explain the lack of one.

Read this: https://www.oldtimestrongman.com/articles/the-iron-by-henry-rollins/

Then get this book:

https://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Basic-Barbell-Training/dp/0982522738

Follow that program for the next 6 months. Shut up, quit whining, FOLLOW THE PROGRAM.

Lift, Eat, Work, Sleep. Shut off social media *ENTIRELY*. No facebook, no twitter. Instagram, but ONLY people who are motivating you to lift better and live better, not “lifestyle influencers” or “fitness influences” who are just showing off with fake weights and camera angles.

Spend 1 hour EVERY FUCKING DAY outside in the sunlight doing something. Walk, run, bike ride. Get sun on your face and your skin.

DO.

THE.

WORK.

Story time from someone twice your age:

IN 2020 I got “let go” from my job on January 1. It was outsourced to India. Partially it was my fault for NOT taking the advice I’m going to give you. But anyway when the Panicdemic hit I had no job a wife with a part time job, a child and a $2000 mortgage.

So I started delivering groceries in the afternoon. The morning was spent looking for work, the afternoon was spent wandering around grocery stores and dropping groceries off at people too infirm (one was a end-stage cancer patient, another was blind, a third was blind in one eye and had a bad leg), too scared, or just too busy to go shopping.

This was a HUGE in pay for me. I went from $65 an hour to about $15, and I had to pay gas, car maintenance out of that.

But I made a *deliberate* decision to be as cheerful, and as pleasant a person as I could. This is not “me”, I’m a grouchy, cynical old fuck. Hell, I was a grouchy, cynical *young* fuck, and I didn’t age well.

But had work shirts, and I would put my pleasant demeanor on with my shirt.

At one point, about 4 months in, a lady about 20 years younger than me who worked at <redacted> tried to give me her phone number.

I’m no Adonis. I wear glasses with a pretty heavy prescription, I do not have a strong jaw. I’m, overweight (well, was at the time) but not obese.

But I was cheerful, and I was pleasant, and that was enough to make her think I was interested in her. And honestly if I was single? I’d have taken her out on a date. She wasn’t a glamor model or a porn star, but she was pretty and would “clean up well”. But that’s not the point.

The point is that IT’S YOUR FUCKING ATTITUDE.

Stop complaining about the results you aren’t getting from the work you’re not doing.

While you’re working on your body, take a hard look at your life and your mind. At some point in your life you took several IQ tests. Standardized tests in school, ACT/SATs, maybe even military ASVAB. Average those results–that will be a rough, but honest assessment of how smart you are. Then take that and go find a career (not a job) that you are intellectually AND temperamentally suited for.

Then be reasonable about your standards.

Mick Jagger and Steven Tyler are about the ugliest men out there, but they’re famous and rich.

People like you and I aren’t famous, and we aren’t rich. And we don’t have porn star dicks.

So we don’t date supermodels.

Men are most successful with women when they date/mate women at our below their place on the social hierarchy.

This means that you need to become the best version of you you can be, and you won’t get that why whining on Reddit.

Now, as to your “small dick”. Stop judging your dick size by what you see in Porn.

Think about it–if most men were the size of male porn stars THERE WOULD BE NO MALE PORN STARS. Most 18 to 25 year old men would *DO THAT WORK FOR FREE*. Sure, a lot of them couldn’t for various reasons, but there would definitely be enough of a surplus that it would be impossible to make a living at it outside of certain specialties.

The thing is that for *most* women anything between about 3.8 and 6.47 in *length* is “just fine”, and LONGER than 6.5 means pain and discomfort if the guy gets to hammering. There’s actually “dick bumpers” https://ohnut.co/ for guys who are *too long** it keeps them from beating the shit out of their lady friend’s cervix.

Note and keep in mind for later that *MOST WOMEN DO NOT ORGASM FROM JUST PENETRATION*

https://www.realclearscience.com/journal_club/2015/03/03/is_your_penis_normal_theres_a_chart_for_that_109106.html

>As shown, 95% of erect penises fall within the range of 9.8 cm (3.86 in) to 16.44 cm (6.47 in). Also, it is interesting to note that the stretched flaccid penis is quite similar in length to the erect penis.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32666897/

There’s a small (no pun intended) chance that you do have what is called a “micro penis”, which is IIRC under 3.6 but that’s like .14% of the population, so pretty unlikely. If you’re that small, see a doctor. There is surgery that they can do, but it’s not generally done for cosmetic reasons. I’m sure you could find a doctor that does it, but you’d pay completely out of pocket and it wouldn’t be cheap and it would be painful.

Now, remember that most women don’t orgasm from penetration? That just means that you have to figure out how to do it other ways. Your tongue isn’t shorter, your fingers aren’t too stubby. There are LOTS of videos on youtube about how to perform cunnilingus, and how to use your fingers on a woman.

1 point

·

7th Feb 2022

Yeah.

Reset your squat 15 pounds and then add a light squat day on the middle day of your week. The weight will be 90% of your last heavy squat. Add weight on the first and third day of the week.

For the deadlift you should begin deadlifting every other day alternating with chins or cleans. Then once that gets hard you’ll only deadlift once a week on the light squat day and chin or clean on the other days.

Get the Blue Book and read it if you havent. Then the Grey Book. Programming changes only get more complicated from here, it’s important that you hire a coach or learn the principles of programming yourself so you can continue to make progress.

1 point

·

4th Feb 2022

This is not specific to tennis, but I am a competitive tennis player (4.5 NTRP), and I suffer from a bad upper back/neck (I sit on a computer all day for work). The only thing that has helped my pain is weightlifting. And I mean heavy free weights with a focus on barbell compound lifts. A helpful book for this is Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe. I would highly suggest reading it then hitting the gym. He goes into painful amounts of detail for each lift he describes. It is important to do the lifts correctly, if you do you will benefit but if you do them incorrectly you may injure yourself further.
Here are some links

Starting Strength Book
Starting Strength YouTube Channel

I hope this helps.

1 point

·

18th Jan 2022

Best place to star to put lots of weight on the bar:
starting strength book

1 point

·

26th Dec 2021
ItemCurrentLowestReviews
Starting Strength: Basic Barbell Training, 3rd ed…$24.87$24.874.8/5.0

&nbsp;

^Item&amp;nbsp;Info&nbsp;|&nbsp;Bot&amp;nbsp;Info&nbsp;|&nbsp;Trigger

1 point

·

22nd Dec 2021
ItemCurrentLowestReviews
Starting Strength: Basic Barbell Training, 3rd ed…$24.87$24.874.8/5.0

&nbsp;

^Item&amp;nbsp;Info&nbsp;|&nbsp;Bot&amp;nbsp;Info&nbsp;|&nbsp;Trigger

1 point

·

15th Nov 2021
  • Husband material = Financially stable, Emotionally nurturing, maybe good around kids or pets
  • Boyfriend material = Sexy body, Sexy behavior, acting like you know it, and overall Fun

As others have said.

  1. Get muscles (I.e. Weightlifting, Diet Plan, Good Sleep, Whey, Creatine, Lifting app like Jefit)
  2. Don’t be needy (Figure out how to solve your validation issues)
1 point

·

6th Nov 2021

Shoulder Press. Or as Beefydeadeye stated, Overhead Shoulder Press. I always relate this to the book ‘Starting Strength’ by Mark Rippetoe. But many variations excist of course.

https://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Basic-Barbell-Training/dp/0982522738

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Rippetoe

1 point

·

28th Oct 2021

This is a sub for people following the Starting Strength Method outlined in Starting Strength: Basic Barbell Training, 3rd edition. And here is a link to a short overview with Paul Horn.

Its a barbell strength training program. We use 5 compound movements because that’s all you need to get strong. You should check it out when you’re ready to quit playing around with gzclp

1 point

·

19th Oct 2021

>You are not an authority on what’s good or bad training for this dude.

This is a red herring.

>The most important part of training for the average person is actually being excited to lift and staying healthy.

A novice performing singles at rpe 10 for starting strength subreddit form check is not training.

>Plenty of programs include frequent heavy singles.

They typically, and I say typically because theres really no reputable novice program that does, are intermediate and above programs.

>For a lot of people that’s just more fun than doing 5x5s.

Starting Strength is not a 5×5 program. https://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Basic-Barbell-Training/dp/0982522738/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1532036608&amp;sr=8-1&amp;keywords=starting+strength

>Sure, that’s not the purpose of this sub, but it’s not an objective truth that high volume is the best way to train.

5×5 is not high volume. Nevertheless, a single at rpe 10 (and actually failing the initial attempt) is not a beneficial approach to training.

1 point

·

26th Sep 2021

Go to bed. You’re drunk.

Get better, more fit, & more mentally prepared players for Rome or it will be another bloodbath.

https://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Basic-Barbell-Training/dp/0982522738/ref=nodl_

1 point

·

1st Sep 2021

Congrats on leaving the Smith Machine behind. Now that you’re using free weights, if you want to use the Starting Strength method, you’ll want to adjust some things. Check out the squat tutorial video on the pinned post on this subreddit. Most of the issues with your form others have mentioned are addressed in this short tutorial.

Additionally, I highly recommend the book that this subreddit is based on, Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe. It explains the proper form for compound lifts in great detail, and perhaps more importantly– why these movements should be done that way.

If you have any questions about the video tutorial, the book, or your form after making these adjustments feel free to ask. Please ignore the thirst in this thread. There really are a lot of helpful people in this subreddit– good luck and happy lifting!

1 point

·

27th Aug 2021

Yeah, you’re on the wrong sub. NBD but this sub is specifically about Mark Rippetoe’s Starting Strength methodology and related programs.

https://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Basic-Barbell-Training/dp/0982522738

1 point

·

27th May 2021

I’d recommend Starting Strength. Peter does as well, see point 3.

This is a really simple program but the blue book goes into incredible detail on the movements. The selected exercises hit a large amount of muscle mass and don’t really need anything else when you’re getting started.

1 point

·

12th May 2021

Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe. Changed my life, no lie.

Short answer: free weights are always better than machines, because they encourage natural movement.

1 point

·

2nd May 2021

This is a subreddit for a specific training method called Starting Strength. Heres the book. So the advice around here is gonna go something like this…

Step 1: Stop doing leg raises, foam rolling, stretching, and other silly bullshit. As you have seen this stuff is… not very effective training.

Step 2: Start barbell lifting. Squat, bench, overhead press, deadlift. Here is a playlist of How To videos to get you started.

1 point

·

22nd Dec 2020

Wondering how to apply these things? Get under a barbell asap.

1 point

·

10th Dec 2020

Agree. There won’t be a quick/instant fix if you see a professional. They’ll prescribe you a bunch of exercises (like: https://www.artofmanliness.com/articles/hunched-back-exercises/) and check in periodically on how you are progressing (which is helpful). Ultimately it will be up to you to implement it.

As a lifelong sloucher the only thing that really stopped it for me was strength training. If that’s for you, I recommend: https://www.amazon.ca/Starting-Strength-Basic-Barbell-Training/dp/0982522738 .

1 point

·

23rd Nov 2020

135lbs?! At 5’11” you’re super underweight.

Please eat more and try doing this

1 point

·

11th Dec 2017

Get a book. A real book.

If you wanted to start cooking, would you buy a cookbook? or just a bunch of pinterest recipes and issues of food network magazine?

Same thing here.

Do NOT be like so many people who go to bodybuilding.com, or facebook subscribe to some fitness page, or (guilty myself as a kid) try to do whatever this months copy of muscle&fitness/flex magazine say.

Buy a real, legit honest wieghtlifting textbook and start there. Not only is it better, but its cheaper and more direct, because a good, legit training book will be the only resource you really need for a good 10 years. I would not suggest any sort of “for dummies” book either. Two books I’d go with, either one or the other

Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe

The Encyclopedia of Modern Bodybuilding, Arnold Achwarzenegger PDF
and amazon purchase

and maybe https://www.amazon.com/Golds-Gym-Training-Encyclopedia/dp/0809254468/ref=pd_sim_14_16?_encoding=UTF8&amp;psc=1&amp;refRID=29A5XAXXZS480GWT07M2

1 point

·

26th Jul 2020

> da oden u teretanu, doslovno bi mi se svi tamo smijali

Ljude u teretani boli kurac za druge. U najgorem slučaju ih je jednako strah kao i tebe.

Ako se kojim čudom netko i smije, ignoriraš to jer su debili. Ako se smiju i rugaju kroz duži period, uhvatiš nekog od osoblja i požališ se na to. Ako oni ništa oko toga ne naprave, traži drugu teretanu gdje nisu debili.

> plus neman ni sa kim ić ko će mi pokazat kako se koja vježba radi i šta već

Ako možeš tipkat na Redditu, možeš tipkat i na Googleu ili Youtubeu za iste savjete i dobit ćeš gotove odgovore.

Ali recimo jedna jako dobra knjiga koja se bavi baš time što tražiš je Starting Strength(autor Mark Rippetoe).
https://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Basic-Barbell-Training/dp/0982522738

Možeš naći i PDF toga u piratskoj divljini.

Ima vizualne primjere i detaljne opise vježbi. Kreni od toga.

U teretani kreni lagano i fokusiraj se na postepeno poboljšanje. Zagrij se malo na trkaćoj traci(ili samo trči za početak na tome), ali zadaj si neki cilj, neku rutinu za taj dan i napravi to.

Dobar start je recimo 3 puta tjedno ići u teretanu i odabrati 3 do 5 vježbi po danu. Svaka vježba neka se fokusira na određeno područje tijela.
Nešto ovako: https://stronglifts.com/5×5/

Ignoriraj težinu u tome, za početak uzmi ono što je tebi ugodno dok ne razviješ formu vježbi kako spada, pa onda diži težinu.

Ako hoćeš brzi napredak, lagano plivaj uz to isto. Možda jedan od ta 3 dana zamijeni nešto intenzivnijim plivanjem.

> opet ne mogu bit zadovoljan jer neman nikoga u životu. šta bi ja sad triba radit?

Život ne funkcionira tako da imaš nekog, pa onda radiš nešto. Život funkcionira da radiš nešto, pa onda u tim aktivnostima upoznaš ljude.

Ne može ti netko dati nekakav definitivan način kako da to napraviš, ali to je generalno kako stvari funkcioniraju.

1 point

·

24th Jul 2020

Start with strength training. Squats, Deadlift, Bench Press, Overhead Press, and Rows. Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe is the gold standard for beginner lifting. the sidebar at /r/fitness is very good.

This is a pretty good explanation for why i say to start with strength:
https://www.t-nation.com/training/conditioning-is-a-sham

1 point

·

13th Dec 2019

Keep the flat bench

  1. Get a power rack

2 Build a platform like this https://www.artofmanliness.com/articles/how-to-build-a-weight-lifting-platform/

  1. Read this book and think of it as a manual https://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Basic-Barbell-Training/dp/0982522738

  2. Start with the starting strength program or Stronglifts 5×5

1 point

·

29th Sep 2019

>Is it necessary to get a personal trainer and pay the crazy fees?

Please please please don’t do this. I’m assuming you’re asking about trainers at your local gym whose “services” have been pushed on you. More often than not, these trainers are poorly trained, don’t really cater to their client’s needs and have no motivation to teach you how to train (because they’d lose a client).

Get a good book, watch form videos, and take it slow. I recommend reading Starting Strength (https://smile.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Basic-Barbell-Training/dp/0982522738/ref=sr_1_1?crid=1UCWOB64BOC54&amp;keywords=starting+strength+basic+barbell+training+3rd+edition&amp;qid=1569727215&amp;sprefix=starting+strength%2Caps%2C207&amp;sr=8-1). It’s not without its flaws as a long term training program, and the author’s tone (Mark Rippetoe, a man who is half-meme and half-legend) is brash, but it’s a solid introduction to strength and fitness.

1 point

·

30th Aug 2019

Sounds like you are using machines for your weightlifting – the best way to gain strength is by using free weights.

I am a fan of Mark Rippetoe:

https://startingstrength.com/

Incidentally, the GOMAD advice you got is part of Rippetoe’s advice for beginners that have trouble gaining strength and weight at the beginning of their training.

This is not the only way to so things, but if I were you, I’d learn to squat before anything else.

I bought an earlier edition of the book below quite a few years ago – I still highly recommend it to all people looking for good advice on free weights:

https://smile.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Basic-Barbell-Training/dp/0982522738

Only $9.99 if you have a kindle – money well spent.

1 point

·

6th Jun 2019

“A properly designed and adjusted belt is useful as a safety device when you’re squatting heavy weights. A belt protects the spine by increasing the amount of pressure that can be applied to it by the muscles that support it. The belt itself reinforces the “cylinder” of the ab muscles around the spine by providing “hoop tension” against which to push with your abs. At the same time, the belt acts as a proprioceptive cue for a harder abdominal muscle contraction: you can actually squeeze harder with a belt on than you can without one, just as you can push harder against a loaded barbell than you can against a broomstick. This effect ultimately produces both stronger abs, due to the stronger isometric contraction facilitated by the belt, and a stronger squat, due to the heavier loads made possible by the more stable spine.”
From “Starting Strength: Basic Barbell Training” by Mark Rippetoe
https://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Basic-Barbell-Training/dp/0982522738

1 point

·

24th Nov 2018

I’m biased, but i think all personal trainers are essentially a scam. I was in your position not too long ago, and I ran a program called starting strength and had amazing results. Buy this book:

https://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Basic-Barbell-Training/dp/0982522738/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1543033365&amp;sr=8-1&amp;keywords=starting+strength

Or you can read up on the free resources online:

https://startingstrength.com/get-started/programs

This is not the only avenue to get the results that you’re looking for, and others on this thread will have advice just as good if not better than this. That said, this is a method that will allow you to achieve the results that you want, this stuff actually works

Best of luck

1 point

·

13th Sep 2018

I haven’t even read the guys but from what I understand they are (a) MRA and (b) Red Pill. My ideology is (a) anti-feminist but also anti-MRA and (b) against both Blue and Red Pill for the reasons explained in OP.

And practical solutions are in some of the sections I linked you just have to know how to read the thing. I don’t dwell on those subjects because I am not successful in dating myself so why would I give other people advice? What I do instead is share my experiences with dating and refer to some of the resources that seem helpful and critique the ones that seem less helpful. I believe there is useful stuff in what I linked you to. For example in the tri-fold solution:

  • learning how to lift with correct form and compound lifts (squats, deadlifts, etc.)
  • learning good fashion
  • learning how to cook, change tires, drive a car, know basic DIY
  • learning how to be financially prudent
  • learning how to be career oriented (i.e. have direction for the future) – and potential support with this (qualifications, references, etc.)
  • learning how to hold conversations with friends/family acquaintances as well as being able to talk to strangers

&#x200B;

(as a basis which everyone knows anyway)

And the platitudes I critique but can work I guess:

  • online dating
  • clubs and societies
  • basic hygiene
  • getting out of the house
  • just being confident
  • just being ourselves
  • approaching women
  • having purpose and ambition in our lives
  • looking for self-actualisation in passions of ours that lie outside of dating women
  • going to bars and night clubs
  • hitting the gym
  • consuming works of art, literature or filmography by feminist women with strong female protagonists
  • seeing a therapist/psychiatrist/other related expert
  • *insert meaningless tripe*

&#x200B;

(note: mentioned in the link I sent you: “Yes … plenty of us have tried [those things] and for those of us … who hadn’t … well it is all here for them now.”)

&#x200B;

Also:

  • Concrete Advice

At <em>[</em>my community], we are open to concrete advice as opposed to nebulous inner-game concepts such as self-reflection and the other ones mentioned. For example, I the author of the GMGV Primer have read Mark Rippetoe’s fantastic book “Starting Strength”. Since some degree of muscularity is attractive to women, that is the way I workout now, but if you suggested that literature to me (without knowing that I had read the book), I would not have considered it platitude advice. Mark Manson’s “Models” and Love System’s “Magic Bullets” (guides to attracting women) are two relatively inexpensive books I have mixed feelings on (the content has pros and cons) but again, I would not consider that platitude advice. Lifestyle and dating tips that discuss the severely neglected verbal game element of approaching women are especially recommended because most existing “verbal game” is either just

  1. gimmicky canned material and stupid “routine stackers” that are simply dreadful
  2. so-called “authentic” PUA that denies the legitimacy of verbal game because of number 1. but don’t really consider alternatives because you should “just be confident” and let conversation flow freely or some bullshit

Anything else that deals with propinquity (i.e. specific lifestyle choices that get you closer to women and not just “get a hobby, bro!” simplified bullshit) is considered concrete advice at GMGV. If you are reading this and you don’t have any concrete suggestions (because not everyone does), that’s fine. Just don’t bother giving platitudes, or even advice really. Also, at this point most people normally say they have to know about you personally to give concrete suggestions but it’s not true because the fundamentals for being attractive to a wide population of women are always the same <em>click here</em>.

For that reason, you don’t need to know the ins and outs of a person’s life to give this advice. For example, Starting Strength is a sufficient foundation for the muscularity aspect (well the barbell training part, not so much for nutrition) – as an example. So far I have never encountered a sufficient foundation for verbal game. However there is a sufficient foundation for body language, which is SOFTEN (smile, open body language, forward lean, touch, eye contact but “nodding” not so much, I believe).

But again, I really don’t want to hear about nebulous inner game concepts unless it’s to do with a specific discipline like positive psychology or stoic philosophy but with stronger empirical grounding. Because that stuff is interesting by itself anyway. If you have an academic interest in virtue ethics or Buddhist philosophy, Taoism or any related subjects I would love to learn from you.

&#x200B;

And finally:

Here are some resources based on the central theme in the ‘tutelage section’ of the Primer.

  • Learning how to lift with correct form and compound lifts (squats, deadlifts, etc.)

<em>&quot;Starting Strength: Basic Barbell Training&quot;, Mark Rippetoe [click here]</em>

  • General physicality: self-defence, strength and conditioning, etc.

<em>Beast Skills: Bodyweight Strength Training [click here]</em>

<em>Official Then X: An Introduction to Calisthenics [click here]</em>

<em>Official Bas Rutten: General Strength &amp; Conditioning, Self-Defence and Mixed Martial Arts [click here]</em>

<em>Street Smart Self Protection and Weapons: General Strength &amp; Conditioning, Self-Defence and Mixed Martial Arts [click here]</em>

  • Learning Good Fashion

Not covered

  • Learning how to cook, change tires, drive a car, know basic DIY

Not covered

  • Learning how to be financially prudent

Not covered

  • Learning how to be career oriented (i.e. have direction for the future) – getting good qualifications, references, etc.

Not covered

  • Learning how to hold conversations with friends/family acquaintances as well as being able to talk to strangers

<em>Conversation Starters [click here]</em>

<em>Confidence: What It Is, What It Isn’t [click here]</em>

<em>Social Confidence Builders [click here]</em>ve to learn and read it. It is primarily an ideological manifesto, not a how-to handbook. But how-tos happen to be in there.

1 point

·

21st Mar 2018

Try giving this video a watch and attempting to replicate that setup. This guy is a starting strength coach.

Reason I think this may help you is that your setup may be causing you to have form issues. Other advice would be to read Starting Strength (which stronglifts is derived from). This book has great chapters explaining form (the deadlift chapter is like 50 pages itself even though this is one of the least complicated lifts [which does not mean it is not complicated at all]).

1 point

·

13th Jul 2017

the book for starting strength is https://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Basic-Barbell-Training/dp/0982522738

Practical Programming is the follow up that will teach you how to program your own intermediate/advanced programs.

1 point

·

11th May 2017

It’s not okay at all. Although his back is straight (with such a low weight, it’s ought to be), the setup is all fucked up and you know it, I just haven’t figured out yet why you didn’t point it out and corrected it.

Also, if you want a good, decent form check, I recommend you do a heavy set of five, not a light double. Nothing really sticks out from a light double except your very wrong setup.

I’m going to address the most obvious issue that nobody yet told you:

Foot Positioning

  • You start your deadlift a mile away from the bar, grab it and get it close to you, while having your hips too low, making your deadlift look like a half squat.

Your shins should be approximately 1inch away from the bar (yes, that close), in order to make your midfoot directly below the bar.

Your feet should also be hip width for a conventional deadlift, and your hands, namely your thumbs, should be just outside your legs.

This video sums it all up, and is a darn good guide as to how to deadlift properly, even though it’s only 4 minutes long. If you are interested in knowing more about this stuff, I recommend you read the Starting Strength 3rd edition, by Mark Rippetoe.

I hope this helps, and that you learn from this and become better at deadlifting!

Cheers!

1 point

·

21st Apr 2017

No problem!!! 🙂 And if you like reading, the book Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe is like the definitive volume on form for heavy lifting.

1 point

·

21st Apr 2017

Hey there mate!

Did you do any kind of research about the deadlift and proper form and technique before even attempting to perform this very lift?

It seems very likely you haven’t at all done your homework first.

I’m going to point you some reliable sources of information which you can analyse by yourself and most likely improve your deadlift:

  • Starting Strength – this program is backed up by very experienced lifters who know how to train you properly with proper form, progression, diet, etc. Mark Rippetoe has immense knowledge on this subject, so starting strength is a very reliable source if not the most reliable.

  • Stronglifts – the guy who made this site, Mehdi, takes most of the information from starting strength. He also explains very well, although with less scientifical stuff, how to perform the movements correctly.

  • Additional sources: some youtube channels dedicated to clear and correct information on these lifts, namely the deadlift, like Alan Thrall’s channel, or even Starting Strength’s.

Please, take your time reading these sources and getting a better picture of what a proper conventional deadlift should look like.

I know this is not the immediate answer you’re probably looking for, but at this point I think it’s the most adequate.

Cheers!

1 point

·

10th Dec 2016

There are a lot of things you guys need to fix. And with so many movements, I could write paragraphs. If I had the time, I would.

Do some research. YouTube is a great resource. I recommend Alan Thrall. He has some excellent, concise videos on the squat, deadlift, bench, row, and press; all of the exercises you’re performing. They cover the basics of each movement, and might help you perform the movements with decent form, but there is a lot that they don’t talk about.

For example, it’s easy enough to follow cues, such as “squat below parallel”, but it would behoove you to understand why you should perform the movement this way. For this, you will need to do more research. I recommend:

Starting Strength 3rd edition by Mark Rippetoe is a great starting place. It is a very in-depth approach to the basic movements: the squat, standing press, bench press, power clean, and snatch. Every trainer should read this book.

I’ve heard good things about Strength Theory. The website provides complete, free guides to the basic lifts.

Lastly, I encourage you to continue posting to /r/formcheck after you’ve had some more practice lifting

1 point

·

3rd Nov 2016
1 point

·

12th Nov 2016

I’ve been doing the Stronglifts 5×5 routine using form tips from the book Starting Strength. One of my favorite exercises for the lower back is doing the Pendlay Row. It’s working for me. It may for you as well.

1 point

·

3rd Aug 2016
1 point

·

1st Aug 2016

I really think a beginner barbell routine like Starting Strength or Stronglifts 5×5 would be faster, simpler, and more in line with your goal of building lean muscle. I prefer <em>Starting Strength,</em> it’s more balanced in terms of the ratio of push-to-pull exercises and it includes a power exercise. That and as a beginner, you can recover from a full body workout 3x a week, instead of splitting exercises into upper/lower days. There’s a book by Mark Rippetoe that contains everything you’ll need to know for the first six months.

Does your back injury prevent you from doing barbell squats and deadlifts? You could substitute them for Bulgarian Split Squats (Less overall weight, back angle is mostly straight) and Romanian Deadlifts. When you look up Bulgarian Split Squats, keep in mind that the back foot was traditionally raised only a few inches of the ground, like on a pair of weight plates.

I don’t strongly recommend your superset routine, it’s got a lot of unproductive exercises, like the tricep machine (machines don’t build a useful kind of strength, since you don’t use any sort of stabilizer muscles.) and the upright barbell row has no carryover to any other exercise. Dumbbells are rarely heavy enough to stimulate your Latissimus Dorsi (Lats) and your Trapezious (Traps) muscles very effectively too.

Anyway, feel free to ask me follow-up questions, but I think you’re better off doing a pre-designed routine. Good luck!

1 point

·

6th Jul 2016

Read everything you can about http://stronglifts.com/5×5/

There is an incredible phone app that goes along with this program.

If you want to get real serious and motivated, go buy the book that it is based off of: Starting Strength

The only equipment you’ll need access to is a barbell and plates, a squat rack, and a flat bench.

> What are some things I should or shouldnt do right away?

  • First thing you should do right away is get your diet in check before worrying about your exercise. It sounds to me like you are hoping that exercise will be your primary tool for weight loss. You will likely be sorely disappointed if that is the case. Go get a food scale, a bathroom scale, download MFP, and learn how to calculate and track your calories. This should be your absolute priority.
  • In the gym, do NOT go too hard. You haven’t lifted in a while, prepare to lift a very meager amount of weight for weeks, looking foolish and feeble the whole time. Do it right, don’t copy other people. I started my squats at 90lbs and went up by only 10 every time until it started to feel slightly heavy, then I went up by 5.
  • DO start weightlifting now. It seriously feels so good and like I said above, you are going to start at very light weight. People like to put it off for some reason. Don’t. Just get started with really light weight and start building. It’s nice to have this “grace period” where you don’t have to worry too much about lifting heavy and can focus instead on being comfortable in the gym, using the equipment, if certain movements hurt, and if you need help with form.

  • DO Ask people for help and advice. After a couple weeks with 5×5, if your gym has trainers, I’d suggest getting a single trainer session and having them walk you through all 5 of your big lifts. Make sure you know the correct form and start doing it with weights still fairly light.

  • Do NOT force yourself to do things that you don’t like. But don’t give up on something instantly, either. If you hate 5×5, then explore other options. There’s a ton of great beginner plans out there. Whatever you do, just follow the program to the letter. If it tells you to do a 50% deload, then do it. You said you hate cardio but you used to be a swimmer. So maybe what you meant is that you hate running and ellipticals. Swimming is still cardio, and an excellent form as well. Maybe you’d enjoy biking outside? It’s one of my favorite things to do in the summer. Or hiking! There’s a lot of options. Explore.

  • DO Educate yourself. Make sure you have realistic goals for what you want to achieve. An absurd amount of men and women think they can lose weight and build muscle simultaneously. This is wrong….but only in most circumstances. If you have an expectation, validate it. Don’t rely on baseless assumptions.

Some helpful starting information would be the sidebar here in /r/loseit, which is focused more on losing weight primarily through diet and the sidebar over at /r/fitness, which is focused more on what you might be doing in a gym and why.

1 point

·

28th Jul 2016

Hey, looking good!

Sounds like the trainer is wanting you to go paleo. IMO if the trainer is too pushy or negative about keto, find another trainer. That is, if you even need one.

It depends on what your goals are (strength? endurance? both?). If general strength is a goal (and that’s a great place to start) my unsolicited advice would be to visit Stronglifts and read up there and then perhaps either buy (or get from your local library) Starting Strength and Practical Programming both by Mark Rippetoe and do some research for yourself. There’s really no substitute for having a good handle on weight training IMHO. Rippetoe also has demonstration vids breaking down the various exercises – example.

I had been away from weight training for probably 15 years and have just recently started back up with Stronglifts 5X5. It’s been great so far.

Good luck!

1 point

·

23rd Jun 2016

> What does SS stand for?

Starting Strength. I found it quite helpful when I was starting out, not sure why its listed as a myth.

1 point

·

1st Mar 2016

Yes, deadlifts done wrong are very bad, deadlifts done right are very safe and will give you an insanely strong back.

Here’s a good Alan Thrall video on how to do deadlift: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y1IGeJEXpF4

Also there’s a difference between muscle soreness ”pain” and pain caused by tearing a muscle or a spinal disk injuries, which are rarer than most people think.

You need to keep your back tight and straight through the entire lift, if you can’t that means the weight is too heavy.

Start a program like Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe: http://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Basic-Barbell-Training/dp/0982522738/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1456873002&amp;sr=8-1&amp;keywords=starting+strength+book

1 point

·

23rd Feb 2016

mark your height on the wall, measure with tape measure

https://www.reddit.com/r/Fitness/wiki/programs

It might be hard to find a program that’s all machines. I don’t see one listed there. So you might have to get creative.

Are you intelligent? Are you capable of learning about the science weightlifting and adapting the information to your own personal program?

I’ve recently switch to Hypertrophy Specific Training and I’m loving it.

https://www.lbs.co.il/LabTests/HST_Faq_book.pdf

I DON’T love his suggested routine so I changed it. That’s the beauty of HST. You can do adapt the exercises from pretty much any other program as long as you get an appropriate amount of volume on every major muscle group at least every other day.

Every other day I do

  • 2 sets overhead press
  • 2 sets benchpress
  • 2 sets bent over row
  • 2 sets squat or 1 set deadlift
  • 2 sets lat pull down
  • 2 sets pec flye

plus warmup sets.

I didn’t read starting strength before I started. I wish I did so I better understood the mechanics. http://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Basic-Barbell-Training/dp/0982522738

Just don’t take his dietary advice. GOMAD is dumb. You’re young and overweight so you should have no problem building muscle while you lose fat without eating like a pig. Once you get your BF down you’ll probably have to increase you calories to keep making gains but that’s probably a year away.

Just to give you a little encouragement, I was a fat lazy computer nerd just last year. Now I’m not Arnold or anything, I’ve still got a gut, but my upper body has really popped out and it gives me motivation to keep going. I joke that I’m going for the mountain man look. I don’t have nerd arms anymore, I have bear wrestling arms.

You’re overweight; TAKE IT SUPER EASY ON SQUAT. Start with body weight. Take your fat weight into account when you start adding bar weight. If you can’t do 15 body weight squats you have no business squatting weight. Be careful on your knees.

1 point

·

28th Jan 2016

Going rate for the paperback is $20.

The hardcover is normally $45, but they’re selling it for $23. It came to $27 with shipping for me.

1 point

·

13th Dec 2015

Read this CrossFit Journal article from Mark Ripptoe. A quote from the article:
>
> Lots of people will defend the use of the high-bar
> position, often known as the Olympic squat because it is
> usually the style used by Olympic weightlifters. They will
> say that it’s more like the front squat part of the clean,
> so it is better for strengthening the clean. But they’re
> already doing front squats anyway, both as an assistance
> exercise and every time they clean (not to mention
> overhead squats they do every time they snatch, which
> have physiological mechanics similar to the front squat).
> The high-bar squat is a stronger squat than a front squat,
> but not as strong as a low-bar squat, because the more
> horizontal back angle means that more muscle gets
> used. I think many Olympic lifters do high-bar squats
> mainly because Tommy Kono did them that way. But as
> great an athlete as Kono was, that is not really a reason
> to do them. In fact, the vast, overwhelming majority of
> the strongest weightlifters in the world squat with
> the bar on their traps, because that’s the way it’s been
> done throughout the history of the sport of Olympic
> weightlifting, but that is also no reason

He also wrote Starting Strength which I recommend anyone read who wants to fine tune their barbell lifts. He also has a lot of videos on youtube.

1 point

·

14th Nov 2015

I was in a similar spot, then I bought Starting Strength and went and saw Paulie at South Brooklyn Weightlifting Club.

1 point

·

12th Nov 2015

Ok. In a nutshell:

Buy a kitchen scale and a bathroom scale if you don’t have one. Weigh all the meat and protein foods you eat. Use myfitnesspal.com or some similar program to make sure you eat at least 120 grams of protein every day, and weigh yourself regularly, and write down the weight and the date in a log. Make sure you are eating enough food to gain about 2kg per month. More than that and you will get fat. Less and your progress will be slow.

Get the Kindle edition ($9.99) of Starting Strength and read everything in there about lifting form:
http://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Basic-Barbell-Training/dp/0982522738

Watch Alan Thrall’s Youtube videos on proper form for all the exercises in the program you choose to follow.
https://m.youtube.com/user/athrall7

Read everything on StrongLifts.com. It’s a good program and there’s a lot of good info on the website, and an app to track lifts.

Other good programs include Phrak’s GSLP (Google it). Or if you want something that’s a little more targeted on gaining mass than strength, this one is good:
http://www.aworkoutroutine.com/the-beginner-weight-training-workout-routine/

But do read everything in the FAQ/wiki when you have time.

Ps congrats on quitting smoking

Edited to add: you will get fatter while you’re gaining muscle. When you get to an unacceptable level of chubbiness, stop increasing the amount of weight you’re lifting, and cut back on your calories to 500 below your TDEE, so you will be losing about 2kg per month. Keep that up until you are acceptably thin, then start eating more and start increasing the weight again.

1 point

·

14th Nov 2015

Machines aren’t safer or easier than learning proper form with light weights on barbells, which is where you would start anyway. You still have to know proper form or you’re just as likely to injure yourself (if not more likely due to some machines’ unnatural forced movement paths). When I was starting, I tore the labrum in my shoulder socket, because I was lifting my elbows up too high on the “bench press” machine. Machines don’t help with most of the important details of proper form. I would recommend freeweight training 100%.

Get the Kindle edition ($9.99) of Starting Strength and read everything in there about lifting form:
http://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Basic-Barbell-Training/dp/0982522738

Watch Alan Thrall’s Youtube videos on proper form for all the exercises in the program you choose to follow. https://m.youtube.com/user/athrall7

Read everything on http://www.stronglifts.com. It’s a good program and there’s a lot of good info on the website, and an app to track lifts.

Other good programs include Phrak’s GSLP (Google it). Or if you want something that’s a little more targeted on gaining mass than strength, this one is good: http://www.aworkoutroutine.com/the-beginner-weight-training-workout-routine/

Read everything in the FAQ/wiki here. Take your phone and video yourself performing each exercise with light weights so you can check your form, or get a workout buddy who has also read SS and watched form videos, to give you tips if it looks like your form is off.

1 point

·

31st Oct 2015

You do want proper posture, because it will stop you from getting injured.

When you start out, drilling proper form (posture) into your muscle memory is one of the most important things. This is why you start light and work your way up slowly, so you can give yourself time to learn the right form, without the added pressure of weight.

The posture you see is a result of keeping your spine in a “neutral” position, which will feel and look like a slight lumbar extension.

Every time you lift, you will have cues: Chest up, shoulders back, neutral spine (slight lumbar extension), brace the core (tighten abs), big breath and hold (Valsalva maneuver) – go.

If done properly, these cues will result in the proper form (posture) for maximum safety and effectiveness, and will look like what you see guys doing at the gym.

Most of of us do not have the proprioception, or “muscle sense” to know what our backs are doing at any given time, and this results in bad form/posture, and sometimes it results in people over-extending the lumbar spine instead of keeping it neutral, which can look ridiculous (and is dangerous). This might be what you’re seeing, I know a few people at my gym do this. But more than likely it’s just a combination of proper form/posture.

Get used to it.

EDIT: Read Starting Strength

1 point

·

14th Sep 2015

Lifting for strength….not “working out” or “going to the gym” or wasting time on a machine circuit workout…actually training to lift heavier things.

I think it would be very, very hard to be progressing on a strength program without it having a positive effect on your mental state.

So join a gym with childcare and go lift.

Don’t do a program with a personal trainer or anything out of a magazine. Both of those sources have the core purpose of keeping you slightly dissatisfied so that you come back for more. Do Starting Strength (buy the book) or Strong Lifts 5×5. Don’t be fooled by the simplicity of these programs, they are all you’ll need for the first 6-12 months and have been consistently effective for thousands of people. Also check out the /r/fitness wiki.

1 point

·

4th Aug 2015

A book by Mark Rippetoe.

1 point

·

15th Jul 2015

Starting Strength. It’s a comprehensive introduction to weightlifting, and tells you EVERYTHING you could possibly need to know as a beginner.

1 point

·

26th Jun 2015

>Why Barbells?

>Training for strength is as old as civilization itself. The Greek tale of Milo serves to date the antiquity of an interest in physical development, and an understanding of the processes by which it is acquired. Milo is said to have lifted a calf every day, and grew stronger as the calf grew larger. The progressive nature of strength development was known thousands of years ago, but only recently (in terms of the scope of history) has the problem of how best to facilitate progressive resistance training been tackled by technology.

>Among the first tools developed to practice resistance exercise was the barbell, a long metal shaft with some type of weight on each end. The earliest barbells used globes or spheres for weight, which could be adjusted for balance and load by filling them with sand or shot. David Willoughby’s superb book, The Super Athletes (A.S. Barnes and Co., 1970) details the history of weightlifting and the equipment that made it possible.

>But in a development unforeseen by Mr. Willoughby, things changed rapidly in the mid-1970s. A gentleman named Arthur Jones invented a type of exercise equipment that revolutionized resistance exercise. Unfortunately, not all revolutions are universally productive. Nautilus utilized the “principle of variable resistance,” which claimed to take advantage of the fact that different parts of the range of motion of each limb were stronger than others. A machine was designed for each limb or body part, and a cam was incorporated into the chain attached to the weight stack that varied the resistance against the joint during the movement. The machines were designed to be used in a specific order, one after another without a pause between sets, since different body parts were being worked consecutively. And the central idea (from a commercial standpoint) was that if enough machines – each working a separate body part – were added together in a circuit, the entire body was being trained. The machines were exceptionally well-made and handsome, and soon most gyms had the obligatory, very expensive, 12-station Nautilus circuit.

>Exercise machines were nothing new. Most high schools had a Universal Gladiator multi-station unit, and leg extensions and lat pulldowns were familiar to everybody who trained with weights. The difference was the marketing behind the new equipment. Nautilus touted the total-body effect of the complete circuit, something that had never before been emphasized. We were treated to a series of before-and-after ads featuring one Casey Viator, an individual who had apparently gained a considerable amount of weight using only Nautilus equipment. Missing from the ads was the information that Mr. Viator was regaining size he previously had acquired through more conventional methods as an experienced bodybuilder.

>Jones even went so far as to claim that strength could be gained on Nautilus and transferred to complicated movement patterns like the Olympic lifts without having to do the lifts with heavy weights, a thing which flies in the face of exercise theory and practical experience. But the momentum had been established and Nautilus became a huge commercial success. Equipment like it remains the modern standard in commercial exercise facilities all over the world.

>The primary reason for this was that Nautilus equipment allowed the health club (at the time known as the “health spa”) industry to offer to the general public a thing which had been previously unavailable. Prior to the invention of Nautilus, if a member wanted to train hard, in a more elaborate way than Universal equipment permitted, he had to learn how to use barbells. Someone had to teach him this. Moreover, someone had to teach the health spa staff how to teach him this. Such professional education was, and still is, time-consuming and not widely available. But with Nautilus equipment, a minimum-wage employee could be taught very quickly how to use the whole circuit, ostensibly providing a total-body workout with little invested in employee education. Furthermore, the entire circuit could be performed in about 30 minutes, thus decreasing member time on the exercise floor, increasing traffic capacity in the club, and maximizing sales exposure to more traffic. Nautilus equipment quite literally made the existence of the modern health club possible.

>The problem, of course, is that machine-based training did not work as it was advertised. It was almost impossible to gain muscular bodyweight doing a circuit. People who were trying to do so would train faithfully for months without gaining any significant muscular weight at all. When they switched to barbell training, a miraculous thing would happen: they would immediately gain – within a week – more weight than they had gained in the entire time they had fought with the 12-station circuit.

>The reason that isolated body part training on machines doesn’t work is the same reason that barbells work so well, better than any other tools we can use to gain strength. The human body functions as a complete system – it works that way, and it likes to be trained that way. It doesn’t like to be separated into its constituent components and then have those components exercised separately, since the strength obtained from training will not be utilized in this way. The general pattern of strength acquisition must be the same as that in which the strength will be used. The nervous system controls the muscles, and the relationship between them is referred to as “neuromuscular.” When strength is acquired in ways that do not correspond to the patterns in which it is intended to actually be used, the neuromuscular aspects of training have not been considered. Neuromuscular specificity is an unfortunate reality, and exercise programs must respect this principle the same way they respect the Law of Gravity.

Rippetoe, Mark (2013-11-07). Starting Strength (Kindle Locations 163-170). The Aasgaard Company. Kindle Edition.

1 point

·

8th Jun 2015

Seems like a lot of upper body work with no lower body work. You might just want to start with one of the beginner programs, for example Starting Strength.

1 point

·

26th Jun 2015

>Why Barbells?

>Training for strength is as old as civilization itself. The Greek tale of Milo serves to date the antiquity of an interest in physical development, and an understanding of the processes by which it is acquired. Milo is said to have lifted a calf every day, and grew stronger as the calf grew larger. The progressive nature of strength development was known thousands of years ago, but only recently (in terms of the scope of history) has the problem of how best to facilitate progressive resistance training been tackled by technology.

>Among the first tools developed to practice resistance exercise was the barbell, a long metal shaft with some type of weight on each end. The earliest barbells used globes or spheres for weight, which could be adjusted for balance and load by filling them with sand or shot. David Willoughby’s superb book, The Super Athletes (A.S. Barnes and Co., 1970) details the history of weightlifting and the equipment that made it possible.

>But in a development unforeseen by Mr. Willoughby, things changed rapidly in the mid-1970s. A gentleman named Arthur Jones invented a type of exercise equipment that revolutionized resistance exercise. Unfortunately, not all revolutions are universally productive. Nautilus utilized the “principle of variable resistance,” which claimed to take advantage of the fact that different parts of the range of motion of each limb were stronger than others. A machine was designed for each limb or body part, and a cam was incorporated into the chain attached to the weight stack that varied the resistance against the joint during the movement. The machines were designed to be used in a specific order, one after another without a pause between sets, since different body parts were being worked consecutively. And the central idea (from a commercial standpoint) was that if enough machines – each working a separate body part – were added together in a circuit, the entire body was being trained. The machines were exceptionally well-made and handsome, and soon most gyms had the obligatory, very expensive, 12-station Nautilus circuit.

>Exercise machines were nothing new. Most high schools had a Universal Gladiator multi-station unit, and leg extensions and lat pulldowns were familiar to everybody who trained with weights. The difference was the marketing behind the new equipment. Nautilus touted the total-body effect of the complete circuit, something that had never before been emphasized. We were treated to a series of before-and-after ads featuring one Casey Viator, an individual who had apparently gained a considerable amount of weight using only Nautilus equipment. Missing from the ads was the information that Mr. Viator was regaining size he previously had acquired through more conventional methods as an experienced bodybuilder.

>Jones even went so far as to claim that strength could be gained on Nautilus and transferred to complicated movement patterns like the Olympic lifts without having to do the lifts with heavy weights, a thing which flies in the face of exercise theory and practical experience. But the momentum had been established and Nautilus became a huge commercial success. Equipment like it remains the modern standard in commercial exercise facilities all over the world.

>The primary reason for this was that Nautilus equipment allowed the health club (at the time known as the “health spa”) industry to offer to the general public a thing which had been previously unavailable. Prior to the invention of Nautilus, if a member wanted to train hard, in a more elaborate way than Universal equipment permitted, he had to learn how to use barbells. Someone had to teach him this. Moreover, someone had to teach the health spa staff how to teach him this. Such professional education was, and still is, time-consuming and not widely available. But with Nautilus equipment, a minimum-wage employee could be taught very quickly how to use the whole circuit, ostensibly providing a total-body workout with little invested in employee education. Furthermore, the entire circuit could be performed in about 30 minutes, thus decreasing member time on the exercise floor, increasing traffic capacity in the club, and maximizing sales exposure to more traffic. Nautilus equipment quite literally made the existence of the modern health club possible.

>The problem, of course, is that machine-based training did not work as it was advertised. It was almost impossible to gain muscular bodyweight doing a circuit. People who were trying to do so would train faithfully for months without gaining any significant muscular weight at all. When they switched to barbell training, a miraculous thing would happen: they would immediately gain – within a week – more weight than they had gained in the entire time they had fought with the 12-station circuit.

>The reason that isolated body part training on machines doesn’t work is the same reason that barbells work so well, better than any other tools we can use to gain strength. The human body functions as a complete system – it works that way, and it likes to be trained that way. It doesn’t like to be separated into its constituent components and then have those components exercised separately, since the strength obtained from training will not be utilized in this way. The general pattern of strength acquisition must be the same as that in which the strength will be used. The nervous system controls the muscles, and the relationship between them is referred to as “neuromuscular.” When strength is acquired in ways that do not correspond to the patterns in which it is intended to actually be used, the neuromuscular aspects of training have not been considered. Neuromuscular specificity is an unfortunate reality, and exercise programs must respect this principle the same way they respect the Law of Gravity.

Rippetoe, Mark (2013-11-07). Starting Strength (Kindle Locations 163-170). The Aasgaard Company. Kindle Edition.

1 point

·

30th Jun 2015

>SQUAT – The Important Things You’re Going to Do Wrong

>Depth: You’re probably going to squat to a position above parallel. This will occur because you’re not looking down, you’re not shoving your knees out, you have a stance that is either too narrow or too wide, or you have not committed to going deep.

>Knee position: You will fail to shove your knees out as you start down. This will make correct depth hard to attain and will kill your hip drive.

>Stance: Your stance will be either too narrow or too wide, with your toes usually pointed too forward. This will result in a squat that is not below parallel.

>Eye gaze: You will fail to look down. This will kill your hip drive.

>Back angle: Your back will (usually) be too vertical, due to a faulty mental picture of what your hips do when you squat or due to the incorrect placement of the bar on your back, or your back will be too horizontal, due to your failure to keep your chest up. Either error will adversely affect hip drive and depth.

>Hip drive: You will lift your chest instead of driving your hips up. This will kill your power out of the bottom by making your back angle too vertical.

>Bar placement: You will place the bar too high on your back. This will adversely affect your back angle and your hip drive.

>Rack height: You will set the bar in the rack in a position that is too high. This will make the preferred position on the back difficult to attain.

Rippetoe, Mark (2013-11-07). Starting Strength (Kindle Locations 1034-1043). The Aasgaard Company. Kindle Edition.


Video: Intro To Barbell Training with Mark Rippetoe


Video: How To Deadlift with Mark Rippetoe

Video: How To Low Bar Squat with Mark Rippetoe

Video: How To Overhead Press with Mark Rippetoe

Video: Bench Press Safety with Mark Rippetoe

Video: How to Bench Press with Mark Rippetoe

Video: How to Power Clean with Mark Rippetoe


Video: Weightlifting Shoes with Mark Rippetoe


1 point

·

30th Jun 2015

It could be from your squat form, actually

>As we discussed earlier, the thumb should be placed on top of the bar so that the wrist can be held in a straight line with the forearm.

>The vast majority of people, however, will prefer to hold the bar with a thumbs-around grip. At lighter weights, this is fine because the load is easy to keep in place. But when heavier weights are being used, the grip that results from thumbs-around can create its own problems. Most people have a mental picture of the hands holding up the weight, and this usually ends up being what happens. The bar sits in the grip with the thumbs around the bar, the wrists are bent back, the elbows end up directly below the weight, and nothing really prevents the bar from sliding down the back from this position.

>People who do this will eventually have sore elbows, a horrible, headache-like soreness in the inside of the elbow that makes them think the injury occurred doing curls. If the elbows are underneath the weight, and the force of the weight is straight down (the nature of gravity is sometimes inconvenient), then the wrists and elbows will unavoidably intercept some of the weight (Figure 2-34). With heavy weights, the loading can be quite high, and these structures are not nearly as capable of supporting 500 pounds as the back is.

Rippetoe, Mark (2013-11-07). Starting Strength (Kindle Locations 1034-1043). The Aasgaard Company. Kindle Edition.


Here are 3 images from Starting Strength that should show you proper squat form & bar grip from multiple angles:

Image 1

Image 2

Image 3

1 point

·

18th May 2015
1 point

·

3rd Apr 2015

If you can swing it, bar and plates, homemade squat stands where ever you have the room (backyard?) and Starting Strength. Those will do wonders. Conditioning wise, a jump rope and/or running is fine.

1 point

·

29th Apr 2015

SQUATS!!!! The heavier the better!

buy thishttp://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-3rd-Mark-Rippetoe/dp/0982522738 and do that.

1 point

·

22nd Apr 2015

Step 1: Forget everything you think you know about both these lifts because obviously you picked up something along the way that was so utterly wrong that you’re going to seriously hurt yourself.

Step 2: Watch those two videos on the Deadlift and the Squat.

Step 3: Get your hands on a copy of this book. I’ve heard that some google-fu can help those who don’t want to spend money. Read the corresponding chapters.

Step 4: Lift.

Step 5: If in doubt, post form check, otherwise go back to step 4.

1 point

·

17th Apr 2015

>a book recommendation for the total n00b?

Starting Strength

1 point

·

30th Mar 2015

First, stop worrying about your weight. It’s a figure that encompasses a number of different things which may combine in different ways such that you can have two people who are the same weight, but one is OBVIOUSLY in much better shape than the other.

Second, keep it up with the food tracking. Go here to figure out your daily energy use. Figure out your body fat composition. There are a couple different ways to do this. You can do skinfold measurements, you can do the immersion tank thing, or get a dexa scan. This will give you a much better idea of your actual body composition than simply stepping on a scale, and you’ll get a much better idea of what you will want your goals to be.

Third, start with strength training. Spend six months getting as strong as you can with this program. It’s a great book because it tells you how to perform all the lifts without needing a spotter or trainer.

1 point

·

11th Mar 2015

http://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-3rd-Mark-Rippetoe/dp/0982522738
This is a good book if that’s what you are looking for. Just some base knowledge.

1 point

·

9th Mar 2015

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Starting-Strength-Basic-Barbell-Training/dp/0982522738

You can Google the program for free but in his book his goes into detail about how each lift should be done.

1 point

·

3rd Mar 2015

Read through this & apply it

The Squat

Did you ever read Starting Strength, or did you just start the program without reading the book?

1 point

·

19th Feb 2015

He’s saying you should drop the weights and go Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe

1 point

·

22nd Jan 2015

This post gently assumes that squatting will ruin your knees. (Not sure about your original post but reddit is dominated by people (anonymous 15 year old boys?) who think they are funny and can have the effect that they do.)

The reality is that squats are not bad for your knees –

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/mark-rippetoe/squats-lifting-knees_b_4490749.html

Doing squats wrong is bad for your knees.
Just like driving a car wrong is bad for your everything.

I strongly recommend you get your muscle building instruction from a text written by an established professional (not anonymous people)-
http://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-3rd-Mark-Rippetoe/dp/0982522738

If you actually decide to get the text and read it you’ll be instructed on what to do and expect for an overweight older trainee. I think you’ll find the images and anecdotes compelling to say the least.

Here is an extremely simple and easy and effective diet plan if you want to lose weight:
http://fourhourworkweek.com/2007/04/06/how-to-lose-20-lbs-of-fat-in-30-days-without-doing-any-exercise/

And at the end of the day if you really want a ’round butt’ without any risk at all I recommend doubling your non activity and food intake.

1 point

·

21st Jan 2015

Primary Point: If the movement is done wrong then the costs will always out weigh the benefits.

Mark Rippetoe – http://www.huffingtonpost.com/mark-rippetoe/squats-lifting-knees_b_4490749.html

and his ama
http://www.reddit.com/comments/n13d8/i_am_mark_rippetoe_author_of_starting_strength/

Saying “Western people (amorphous term) lack a good deal of mobility (amorphous phrase)” is the exact reason people should learn to squat correctly whether under a bar or not though OP doesn’t specify.

Barbell Squatting correctly (ignore the phrase good form as you’ve indicated it is not helpful) can be demonstrated: Bar mounted on meat of deltoids just above shoulder, grip set high and tight w/flat wrists, depth must be hip crease below top of patella, bank angle remains constant. Hips drive the bar through the tension in the back up, etc etc.
Squatting with “perfect form” is not some kind of weight room unicorn. You learn it. You do it. You master it. Just like real life.

But this list of squatting check boxes could go on and on with all kinds of hints and tips and bits of advice which is the issue you are implying: the squat, though simple in concept, is in fact very technical.

To learn the squat and reap the massive benefits from doing it get a book written by an established professional:
http://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-3rd-Mark-Rippetoe/dp/0982522738

Your comment sounds like a Physical Therapy (when did OP or his doctor mention ‘posture’?) based opinion which would make sense because PTs and doctors will ONLY see people who hurt themselves even though PT’s and Doctors are not required to even know how the word ‘squat’ is spelled let alone how to ID when it is safely executed or horrendously butchered.

As far as “power lifters being constantly injured” that’s just not true. Lifting in general has one of the lowest injury rates compared to most sports.

It should be noted that athletes interested in performance tend to have desirable figures as well. Attractiveness is simply form marrying function. It’s the same thing. We are attracted to capable healthy people. The absolute nonsense is that these concepts are somehow separate.

Also, if you think chin ups are magnitudes safer than squats you have some crossfit fail videos to watch. Not a knock on chinups but crossfit could make something as innocuous as smelling flowers potentially paralyzing. Crossfit should also be rebranded “Whatever Greg Glassman Thinks You Should Do Today”

Someone gave your comment gold but all that glitters is not.

Take your chicken legs somewhere else, coxcombs.

1 point

·

9th May 2013

I’m drinking the Starting Strength Kool-Aid. So far, so good.

1 point

·

5th Mar 2013

If you’re looking to start with weights, lots of us over at /r/fitness swear by a beginners’ guide, Starting Strength.

Here’s a post by a woman that recently had success with weights.

1 point

·

1st Nov 2013

Read the FAQ over at /r/Fitness. Basically, start with a simple strength program that focuses on big, compound, barbell movements (squats, deadlift, bench press, shoulder press, rows, cleans and so on) and features a structured progression plan. Starting Strength and Stronglifts seem to be reddit’s go-to programs for beginners.

Don’t put it off. Start lifting, like, yesterday. It will change your life.

1 point

·

25th Jun 2013

/r/weightroom’s FAQ has a lot of helpful information that covers most of the basics. It’s probably a better (or at least more focused for your purposes) resource than /r/fitness’s FAQ, though I’m sure there’s something to be gleaned from both.

You’ll also see Starting Strength recommended pretty much everywhere. The book has a good program in it for beginners (standard template is three sessions per week, but you can easily drop that to two without harming anything), but the meat of the book is the description of the exercises.

While nothing in SS should be taken as gospel (Rippetoe is not the God of Fitness many make him out to be), the text offers a fairly thorough introduction into how strength training generally works. Once you’ve been lifting for a few years, you’ll probably start to learn to tweak things (form, programming, etc.) on your own. Hope this helps!

OH ALSO for the love of god, don’t do GOMAD.

1 point

·

8th Jun 2012

Nope, that’s a myth brought by the people that want to sell you a ab/rocker/genie/slide whatever. Core is important don’t get me wrong, but more for overall strength then for “targeting pesky fat”.
A book that a lot of people like (I have self imposed time limits at the gym due to being a dad and a husband and working) that don’t allow me to spend much more than 45 minutes. But if you have more time, a book called Starting Strength is a good place to go for all your strength training needs. The recommended training program is great, but time consuming.

Personally I try to stay with dumbbells mostly because you need to use the extra “stablizer muscles” while still performing the movement. A good reference for lists of excercises is here. For tracking I use Fitocracy because I’m a gamer nerd and it’s fun to get achievements and you can talk with people.

I subscribe to the “push-pull” 3 day sequence. Pick any specific exercise from the following muscle groups:
Day 1:
Chest
Back
Day 2:
Bicep
Tricep
Day 3:
Shoulders
Legs

1 point

·

12th Jun 2012

Bro-lifting is supported by sound, bro-reviewed, bro-science as published in the annals of Mens’ Health or Mescle and Fitness…ExRx or Reps if you play for the other team.

Seriously, this is one of the few legit books you’ll need on the subject of strength training. This will help you develop a program that meets your goals.

1 point

·

30th Aug 2012

If you aren’t an experienced weightlifter, Starting Strength and Stronglifts are both highly recommended. The Starting Strength book has more information than most people ever learn about lifting weights in it. Stronglifts is another popular program based on Starting Strength.

Many people who recomp also swear by Reverse Pyramid Training as advocated by Martin Berkhan (of LeanGains fame).

1 point

·

1st Apr 2012

Not even once.

1 point

·

9th Dec 2011

Your body recovers from running much faster than from resistance exercise. You can easily run every single day of the week and not stall out your progress. Even marathon training programs, which aren’t necessarily pure beginner programs, have you running six days a week. (I don’t run, just linked to the first thing that came up so I doubt that’s a popular program).

By contrast, resistance exercises, done at high intensity/weight, require more than 24 hours to recover from. The more advanced you get, the more rest that you need. When you absolutely just start, the recovery window is probably much less than the 48 hours in the Starting Strength program. But, as you progress and the weights get heavier, that window gets larger and larger until eventually you need even more than 48 hours to recover. 3 days a week works with most people’s schedules, which is why that’s used in SS. You could probably start at every single day, but you’d have to rather quickly (few weeks) move to 3 days a week.

All of that is explained in the book. Also in this book. If you’re dedicated to this lifting thing both of those are invaluable.

If you really have that bug in you where you need to be at the gym every single day, those extra days cannot be heavy days. Like I said, at the start maybe, but after a few weeks it won’t work out. You can go and run or do whatever else you want that you’ll recover from in time for the next SS workout.

1 point

·

30th Dec 2011

Yeah pacing yourself is key. If someone hasn’t linked you yet, you should definitely get yourself a copy of <em>Starting Strength</em>. It’s got everything you’d ever want to know about form and starting a strength regimen (including pacing). And there’s plenty of info in the FAQ in the sidebar.

Swole.me, nutritiondata.com, and wolframalpha.com are all great resources for your diet as well.

I wouldn’t be surprised if your rock climbing gets easier, too. Deadlifts will really work your back and your grip strength.

1 point

·

18th Nov 2011

http://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-3rd-Mark-Rippetoe/dp/0982522738/ref=sr_1_8?s=books&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1321639300&amp;sr=1-8

3rd edition is being released this month, amazon should have it soon. It is well worth the cost.

0 points

·

27th May 2021
0 points

·

27th Oct 2020

He wrote the Bible. +coaching barbell training since ‘78.

0 points

·

8th May 2015

Best way to increase deadlift is to deadlift more often!

and read this:
http://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-3rd-Mark-Rippetoe/dp/0982522738

0 points

·

4th Apr 2015

Here’s a blog with citations stating leg showing leg press machines cause injury.

Here’s a book by Dr. Stuart McGill showing even more about isolation machines and their high rate of injury for the lower back, as well as other reasons for common injury.

Tony Gentilcore speaking out against leg presses.

Post with references documenting knee injury for loaded knee extensions.

Here Gordon Waddell a PhD in exercise science goes over how horrible seated leg extensions, smith machine squats, and leg presses are due.

Eric Cressey one of the most well qualified injury related Kinesiology coaches mentions the use of machines relating to an increase in knee injury.

Eric Cressey points out that the shearing forces on the knees and lumbar spine are increased by the fixed line of motion during a smith machine squat.

Also, anyone who’s read Mark Rippetoes Starting Strength should know that he is one of the most famous strength and conditioning coaches of all time and his stance on machines are quite clear in his book.

So yeah, do a little research.

Edit:
PubMed study showing the that isolation exercises are useless for strengthening rotator cuffs.

Article by John Petrizzo DPT, Stef Bradford PhD, and Jordan Feigenbaum about how stupid machines are.

0 points

·

20th Apr 2015

>If the bar is placed high on the back – on top of the traps, where most people start off carrying it because it’s an easier and more obvious place for a bar – the back angle must accommodate the higher position by becoming more vertical to keep the bar over the mid-foot. If the back angle is more vertical, the knee angle must become more closed because the knees get shoved forward when the hips open up. In other words, the higher bar position makes the back squat more like the front squat, and we don’t want to front-squat for general strength development because it doesn’t effectively train the source of whole-body power: the posterior chain.

Rippetoe, Mark (2013-11-07). Starting Strength (Kindle Locations 469-474). The Aasgaard Company. Kindle Edition.

0 points

·

4th Feb 2015

Are you being deliberately obtuse? I didn’t link you to the T-Nation article, I linked you to approximately 242,000 search results, 99% of which will back up my claim. Find me one link that says that a competition squat to depth is defined as anything other than the crease of the hip going to or below the top of the knee.

*The International Powerlifting Federation
>Upon receiving the Chief Referee’s signal the lifter must bend the knees and lower the body until the
top surface of the legs at the hip joint is lower than the top of the knees

*[Wikipedia](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Squat_(exercise\))
>Squats can be performed to varying depths. The competition standard is for the crease of the hip (top surface of the leg at the hip joint) to fall below the top of the knee;[4] this is colloquially known as “parallel” depth.[5]

USA Powerlifting
> As stated in the rulebook the top surface of the leg at the hip joint must descend until it is below the top of the knees.

Powerlifting to win
>Nearly every federation’s rulebook contains approximately the same rule.

See also: any book that discusses powerlifting form, such as Mark Rippetoe’s &quot;Starting Strength&quot;.

0 points

·

11th Mar 2014

Gaining and losing weight is determined by the calories you consume. Running burns calories which may get your calorie count to a deficit. It’s more about WHAT you eat as opposed to how much you eat to gain muscle. You probably won’t gain much muscle doing bodyweight training alone though.

You’ll more than likely grow tons of resistance and stamina though. I know someone who did the push up challenge and didn’t look noticeably different. You’re going to have to do some actual strength training for the muscle development. For that, I would recommend giving Starting Strength a read.

0 points

·

11th Dec 2014

Using drugs to find a sense of self worth is a spiral without end. Why don’t you work on yourself? You’re a successful young man with your best years ahead of you. You can build confidence. Get a nice hair cut, buy a pair of good looking shoes. Lift weights. Lots of guys “go to the gym”, but don’t do it right. Pick up Starting Strength, and do GOMAD, or half of it. You may potentially be able to put on 10 kg of muscle in a year. “Fake it till you make it” is real. Act confident. Convince yourself that you’re worth something. Different things work for different people. You can find a creed or mantra that you can repeat to yourself. Or you can sit down every day and write down all your good qualities. I listen to certain music when I have an oral exam or an interview. Put yourself out of your comfort zone. Force yourself to do things that make you uncomfortable. Make yourself approach women just for the sake of it. It’s just a mental block, they don’t bite unless you want them to. Maybe pick up a combat sport, for example BJJ or Judo. You’ll start out being handled like a kitten, but as you get better you’ll feel yourself grow mentally. You don’t need drugs or alcohol to feel good about yourself. Use them for fun if you want, but you shouldn’t depend on them.

0 points

·

3rd Jan 2014
0 points

·

23rd Nov 2014

Shit, Starting Strength is actually useful for something.

0 points

·

4th Jul 2014

I mentioned this in a different post:

> Buy “Starting Strength” by Rippetoe and use that program and you’ll be fine as a beginner/intermediate sprinter.

http://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-3rd-Mark-Rippetoe/dp/0982522738

0 points

·

1st Jan 2014

Just buy the book and get to work. You know the one. The one true book.

Starting Strength. Study it diligently. Ask questions on the forum.

Go to the hardcore gym. You know, the one with the painting of the gorilla doing deadlifts on the outside. Don’t be scared, all those dudes (and chicks) are really cool and are happy you’re there lifting. So keep lifting, but don’t listen to their crappy advice. Follow The Program, refer to the book often.

Keep a workout log. A cheap spiral notebook will give you a lot of mileage.

As you get stronger experiment with diets. Intermittent fasting (/r/leangains), /r/Paleo, /r/Keto, some other freaky shit. Take notes.

Take pictures every week.

Weight every workout.

0 points

·

29th Oct 2013

There is so much more to being physically fit in the military than the PT tests your goal should be strength with an emphasis on the performance of those events. Ruck marches will kill you if you don’t lift legs and do hard running in particular and they’re a big part of any Infantry training even if you’re SF.

If you really want to do SF (assuming you mean US Army) I would recommend you memorize some of the FMs, Ranger Handbook, and lift weights for strength (Faqs is great so is Starting Strength)

Also realize that SF isn’t fun, you don’t do cool stuff all day.
These guys are professionals who are the best and embracing the suck, the worst of suck. If you don’t want to be cold and tired and sore and ready to quit and still keep going you’re not gonna make SF selection.

0 points

·

14th Sep 2013

I’m 34, divorced, and dating. I’m working a shitty job because it allows me to work on the career I want to pursue at night. Women (particularly younger women) are becoming aware to what actually happens to men when they go through a divorce. As long a she sees you have higher aspirations than where you are, you’ll be fine.

First things first get some male friends. Some friends that have fun. Watch the game with them or go out drinking. Be socially active but do not seek pussy yet.

Figure out what you want to do for your career. Don’t worry if it takes a while to get there. You have time. Start taking steps to where you WANT to be.

I would recommend listening to The Black Phillip Show.

I would also suggest getting a gym membership and the book Starting Strength.

Leave the toilet seat up ALL the time. Learn to cook for yourself. Set the desktop on your computer to some fine ass bitches.

Time for another serious question. Do you want to have [more] kids? If you do not want kids you may want to look into getting a vasectomy. There are women out there who get knocked up to trap dudes and it doesn’t have to be yours for her to try.

Decide what you’re looking for. Understand that there are plenty of different women and even if you pursue monogamy as an end you don’t need to use it as a beginning.

In all honesty I have infinitely better game at 34 then I ever did at 24. Dating actually seems a bit easier than I would have expected. Being an older guy gives you a big leg up in the fuck game versus young guys as well. Expect your dick to carry more weight than it has in a long time.

0 points

·

21st Oct 2013

Ignore their tips. Take a look, it’s in a book. Reading rainbow!

0 points

·

28th Jan 2013

You don’t need a trainer. Most are not worth the money.

Buy this book, study it, find a good gym and follow the program. Getting ‘toned’ is a diet issue and you shouldn’t worry about that until after you have put on weight:

http://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-3rd-Mark-Rippetoe/dp/0982522738

0 points

·

25th Feb 2012

> tasted meat 1-2 times

What kind of meat? Not every meat is the same. I also don’t really get the moral argument against eating meat, .. I mean, I understand it logically from a “don’t harm others” perspective, and I can’t really come up with a moral counter-argument for eating meat.. but I guess, for me, I couldn’t live without meat. 😛 I also wonder how you get proper levels of protein if all you primarily eat is plants and carbs/sugar. Or how you get anything besides carbs in your diet. I suppose you do get incidental levels of protein from plants..

I look at it this way, no one species is an island. No, not even humans. Humans are host to some ten times more bacteria cells than our own cells. There are so many examples of symbiotic relationships in nature. This might be somewhat of a naturalistic fallacy — just because it occurs in nature doesn’t make it “right,” but I also put the needs of humans above the needs of animals.

But of course it’s your body, so if you’d prefer not to eat meat, then don’t. 😉

> Only doing cardio now ..

io is important to overall health, but if your primary goal is to “lose weight,” cardio isn’t going to help you there. You’re closer to your goal weight.. actually, I guess we’re about at about the same point, as I want to get down to 180 and then reassess what my next target should be. That’s 20lbs away. The conventional wisdom for weight loss is calorie in – calorie out. You lose weight by using more calories than you take in, and while this is true, there are a lot more variables at play than what you eat less what you do. Eating less makes you want to do less, and exercising more makes you want to eat more.. kind of a double edged sword, eh?

If you’re more worried about your overall body comp and health, cardio and weight lifting are important. I would say weight lifting is more important and would help you in other metrics such as losing pants sizes and wearing smaller shirts. Blah, I need to practice what I preach and do some weight lifting so I can lose these manboobs I still have after all this weight I’ve lost. You might check out [/r/fitness](/r/fitness), where most people would recommend Starting Strength as a guide for working out. I’ve heard this adage bandied about there: “Lose weight to look good with clothes on, lift weights to look good without clothes.”

> One question – how did you lose nearly 10 pounds a month?

I’m sure I had A LOT more weight to lose than you is most of it. I was 275 initially.. so I have to lose damn near 100lbs to get to my “ideal weight.” I also ate like a frikken bear.. I went back and did some calorie totals for what I usually ate during a day back then and it came out to be roughly 4,500 calories for one day. To put it in perspective my daily calories are only a bit above 1,500 now. I did start out by running, but I have to credit about 95% of my weight loss to diet changes more than becoming more active. Well, that’s not exactly honest, because I do think that trying to run forced me to improve my diet.. because who wants to run after eating a bag of chips and drinking a soda? But any calorie deficit I created by running was usually negated by eating more that day.

Most recently though I started doing keto, which is a low carb, high fat diet similar to Atkins. You can check it out at [/r/keto](/r/keto) if you want to learn more about it, but be warned.. you will have to get over your fear/disgust of meat in order to do keto properly. 😛 And as far as I go, I lost 15lbs in the first two weeks of doing it. Most of it was water weight, and I’ve kind of stalled at 200lbs for about a week.. but I’m dabbling with some intermittent fasting to see if I can break this plateau. But beyond that, cut out/down the obvious bad stuff and concentrate on eating more fruits and vegetables and you should be good to go. If you snack a lot, try drinking about half a liter of water before you actually snack.. many times when you think you’re hungry you’re actually dehydrated and thirsty.

I think the moral of my story as far as weight loss goes is consistency though. Don’t tell yourself “I’m gonna have this donut and THEN NEVER EVER EVER!” Any diet you’re on should have wiggle room enough for a cheat day if all you’re doing is counting calories. If you have a 2,000 calorie limit, but on your cheat day you end up having 4,000 calories.. that’s still an average of less than 2,300. We all fuck up, and in all honesty when I started trying to lose weight this time I had a lot less of a plan than I have before. I posted to [/r/loseit](/r/loseit) when I hit the 70lbs mark that goes into a little more detail about what I did. As you can see, I didn’t really do anything in particular at the start. 😛 No matter what I did — if I went over my calorie limit by 1,000 or 3,000 (it’s happened).. I knew the next day was a new day. I also didn’t really try to compensate for overages later in the week — if I ate 4,000 calories yesterday I would still eat my 1,500 calories today and not fast for a day and a half.

> I am a very good listener ..

That’s the drawback I guess. I had this issue back when I was younger too, but I suppose the trick is to being assertive in your boundaries. I also kind of stay away from clubs/parties in the general sense because I’m quite soft spoken and in all honesty don’t really like the prospect of having to yell in order to be heard by anyone. That’s something I’m working on as well, being assertive in general, so I can’t give any concrete advice on that, but I guess I believe that anyone who only wants you around to talk to and never wants to listen is probably not really worth having as a friend.

> Dating.

well, at least you’re a step further.. I just hit 30 a few weeks ago and I’ve never even asked anybody out. All the same, it’s not something I’m interested in exploring right now. Many more things I want to fix before I worry about that. I think as you get more friends and in general “put yourself out there” more you will probably feel more confident in approaching someone you’re interested in before they “friendzone” you. Of course, friendzone is a bit of a misnomer, and I think that as long as you’re honest/up front with people that you might be interested in dating more so than being friends, that shouldn’t be an issue. Goes back to assertiveness though of course.

And I’m happy to help if you think I have, but because a lot of these things I’m dealing with myself (especially the weight loss / self image thing).. I think it helps to talk about it. So it’s not totally selfless that I’m typing all this stuff out. I’ve actually been going to a counselor for the last month or so for similar reasons as you made this post and while he hasn’t really helped me any real transcendental or poignant ways, talking to someone about my issues does make me think about them a little more than usual.. which definitely helps.

Haha, I’m torn about giving you a cookie. I would be an enabler! ;p

0 points

·

27th Dec 2012

Get your reading on man. Rippetoe’s Starting Strength is a great way to become familiar with the basics of barbell lifts. Give it a read, and get familiar with the theory behind what you’re doing.

Educate yourself. Bad coaches exist even at the best of gyms, and educating yourself is the only way to identify them. It’ll help you avoid the worst of “Bro” bullshit, and keep you from falling in to the CF kool-aid when it does more harm than good.

0 points

·

7th Sep 2012

Hit the gym. Get on Starting Strength.

-1 points

·

30th Aug 2018

If you really want to learn the how and why you train with barbells then I still think that Starting Strength is the best starting point for a new lifter. So buy the book, read the whole book, do a proper linear progression with great form, and then adapt from there.

-4 points

·

8th Dec 2018

Ass to grass. When perfecting form, keep the weight manageable. Don’t worry about how much you’re lifting. This is a major problem for most young guys. They want to look and feel strong, but with poor form over time you will hurt yourself from micro injuries and eventually an acute injury. Form trumps all. The weight will come. When one has both perfect form and stacks the plates to the brim it is a beautiful site to see, but one has to earn it over time. I once saw a 55 year old financial advisor with 45s to the brim, ass nearly touched the floor, and he barely flinched with a few sets of 4-6. And he looked like a regular professional guy. He wasn’t normal.

Starting Strength is the best book you can buy to perfect your form for all foundation exercises like squats and deadlifts. In fact, if you want to be the strongest person you can be, only really worry about mastering both squats and deads. Both are full body workouts and will make you a beast. They are hard for a reason. You are using every fiber of your being doing those movements.

Starting Strength: Basic Barbell Training, 3rd edition https://www.amazon.com/dp/0982522738/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_GaadCbKTMX73R

-11 points

·

20th Jul 2019

Looks like a big waste of time. Read The Two-Factor Model of Sports Performance and go buy the blue book instead.