What is the opinion of Reddit about the
Practical Programming for Strength Training?

A total of 32 reviews of this product on Reddit.

1 point

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24th Mar 2022

Pick up Practical Programming and read the first section to make sure you’ve squeezed everything you can out of the NLP.

Then look at the intermediate section. There are several examples of what to do for olympic lifting including, as someone else mentioned, a Nebraska method.

Also, sex has a great deal of impact on training on average while gender, to whatever extent that word is defined, has none. You may be able to argue the gender is flexible, but sex isnt. It comes down to gametes and outside of an intersex issue, which would be important to detail when asking for training advice, you’ll fit nicely into one of two categories; ovum producer, or spermatozoan producer.

1 point

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15th Sep 2021

Alright. Good news is solution is simple. Bad news is you’re not gonna like it.

You dont need to try eating a caloric surplus, you need to gain weight. That means putting how ever much food down the hatch that it takes to gain about 3 lbs a month for the foreseeable future.

In the mean time we should adjust your programming. You’ll be an “artificial intermediate” meaning that due to your circumstances you’ll be forced to train like a more advanced athlete than you actually are, which just means increasing the weight less often.

I’d suggest picking up Practical Programming and reading the thing. Particularly the 4 day texas method outlined in Chapter 7 under the “Split Routine” section. It’s a 4 workout routine (Days A, B, C, D) that can be performed 3 days a week with a 4 week cycle looking like this

Week 1: A,B,C
Week 2: D,A,B
Week 3: C,D,A
Week 4: B,C,D

It’s got plenty of room for accessory work too but you’ll still have to cut out a lot of the silly stuff Blaha has you doing. That’s ok though

1 point

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5th Sep 2021

>Leaving aside the fact that it’s OPs first time deadlifting and it looks pretty decent, what muscle group is not getting worked in the clip that would be worked in a deadlift closer to optimal form

Well OPs deadlift is pretty legit. But with bad form breaks on conventional you can find a lot of the weaker legs and a disproportionately strong back.

>I have no idea why you are talking about squats in this context. My squat variation selection has very little to do with my deadlift training.

I’m not sure what your goal is while training but if it’s general strength training like powerlifting, this is extremely common.

>What basis do you use for this frankly bizarre assertion?

Practical Programming for Strength Training
https://www.amazon.com/dp/0982522754/ref=cm_sw_r_apan_glt_fabc_XV2JYHD5ZKZPBKT7Q229

Most breakdowns on programming for strength training will touch on similar things.

1 point

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19th Jan 2021

Everyone has a different morphology, so if you have different body proportions then you’ll find your range of motion may be more difficult. The deadlift isn’t specifically a necessity though it can be really good way to groove the hinge pattern which is definitely an important movement to do under load.

As others have mentioned, a sumo stance may be worth trying, Romanian deadlifts are also a great way to work the hamstrings and it’s also worth considering reverse hyperextensions or kettlebell swings. As with anything though if you’re not sure then talk to a good coach or even someone at your gym who you trust.

TL;DR it’s not essential but it can be useful. Ask someone who you know can do it to give you some pointers. Also I’m sure if you train you’ve seen this before but I really can’t recommend Practical Programming for Strength Training enough https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/0982522754/ref=cm_sw_r_u_apa_fabc_3qTbGbWZTJ29Y

1 point

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17th May 2017

…Drawing conclusions about training for athletes based on a body of literature devoted to exercise for a few small subsets of the general public cannot be and never has been productive… Empirical evidence is regarded by some people as data resulting from controlled experimentation in a formal study environment… they may regard the absence of an experimentally generated data set as an absence of knowledge… The observation of experienced individuals – in this case, experienced coaches who have dealt with thousands of athletes over decades – are often regarded by academics in the exercise science publishing business as mere ‘anecdotal’ reports, tantamount to hearsay and innuendo… Exercise science has its problems. The populations it studies are typically small… These people are very seldom trained athletes… Often the methods themselves are poorly constructed… Sometimes the study duration is too short to reveal anything meaningful… In the absence of other data, the informed observations of coaches are the best data we have, and conclusions drawn from them are far superior to extrapolations from very bad exercise studies… In the absence of any meaningful experimental data generated by peer-reviewed studies regarding the long-term effects of barbell training, we are forced to rely on the observations of hundreds of thousands of coaches and athletes who carefully picked their way through the mistakes made during the process of acquiring experience…
© 2013 "Practical Programming for Strength Training" 3rd edition

1 point

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5th Jan 2017

Let me google that for you.

https://www.amazon.com/Practical-Programming-Strength-Training-Rippetoe/dp/0982522754

> Practical Programming for Strength Training 3rd Edition addresses the topic of Training. It details the mechanics of the process, from the basic physiology of adaptation to the specific programs that apply these principles to novice, intermediate, and advanced lifters.

1 point

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29th Dec 2016

As for whether I still have the symptoms…I think so, largely. But if so then maybe it’s not Low T because those second results came back great from the hospital (except FSH maybe?). I do wonder if the Low T clinic faked my bloods for business, or if a small amount of Test Cyp kickstarted my gonads, or if its a natural cyclical thing, or if the Test Cyp created a reverb/rebound effect.

I have a WiFi scale that tracks my weight for me, I’m 6’0″ and stuck between 160 and 170 for the entire past 12 months (95% of the time in a 6 pound range). Measure weight every morning after pooping, before any food/fluid intake. I have not yet done a detailed food log.

Nailing down my diet and lifting plan now. Food scale will be here tomorrow, and I supplement with protein shakes that include oat flour/powder for extra slow carbs. I’m aiming for 480g slow carbs (primarily oat and rice), 100g fat (primarily canola/olive), and 170g protein every day (whey/eggs/chicken/beef/pork/milk). Not quite hitting macro goals yet. Food log + WiFi scale should answer questions about weight gain difficulties.

I’m going to get training on lifts and programming from Andy Baker in the next couple months. I’ve got a power rack in my garage that I’ve had since college, and use it 1-2 times/day (morning or evening). Lifts are abysmal, please don’t ask. Form is pretty good though. Had to do yoga for a year to get the hamstring flexibility to deadlift, only achieved that a couple months ago and I’m very happy with my flexibility now.

Fatigue isn’t as bad anymore but I’ve been supplementing modafinil which helps a ton, and focusing a lot more on my daily schedule, diet, workouts, and staying away from alcohol.

Anxiety is still quite bad, stops me from being as productive as I need to be (paralyzing worry), and makes me (internally only) “jump” at sudden noises/movement. It’s very annoying.

1 point

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24th Aug 2016

https://www.amazon.com/Practical-Programming-Strength-Training-Rippetoe/dp/0982522754/ref=pd_bxgy_14_img_2?ie=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=R7ENT2CB03NY8N0HDR0P – has advanced novice and intermediate programs.

How is your form? If your form is not great I’d argue that a program like SS or SL5X5 is going to be useful because you should really spend a few weeks practicing your form at lower weight – particularly if you are not under supervision of a coach.

1 point

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29th Oct 2015

As things start to slow down at late novice, there are a few tricks you can try. They’re all detailed in Practical Programming http://www.amazon.com/Practical-Programming-Strength-Training-Rippetoe/dp/0982522754

But a down and dirty, quick version in order:

  1. change the middle of the week workout to a light day on the squat. A couple of sets at around 80-85% or even lower depending on how beat up you are.

  2. Switch to 3×3’s

  3. Do one heavy work set of 5, then 2 back off sets at 90-95%

  4. Go to a Heavy/Light/Medium

Run these out before moving to a true intermediate program. Make sure everything else is in order – not missing workouts, eating, sleeping, etc.

Fat dudes just do the program without eating a bunch more food. We have energy reserves called excess fat and can do what the kids call “eating clean”.

1 point

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8th Jul 2015

There are entire books written on programming. The gold standard, in my opinion, is called Practical Programming.

I would just run a tried and true program. There are a ton of them in the FAQ.

Regarding your routine, there are so many concepts and principals missing it would really be easier for you to do some research (via a book like Practical Programming), or run an established routine and trust it.

1 point

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1st May 2015

Thanks for writing up your detailed thoughts here. Auto-regulation issues are something I hadn’t thought of and could pose a challenge to me with my limited lifting experience.

Also I’ve started reading Practical Programming which I think has TM in it. Perhaps a good bridge from strict linear progression once I’m back on a (slight) caloric surplus.

1 point

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17th Feb 2015

I’ve always seen good results with Mark Rippetoe’s programs.

Depending on how advanced you are:
Starting strength is a solid program and has a number of variations that tailor to level and goals. You said you’ve been lifting for 9 months. Typically people would have moved on from starting strength at this point but seeing as you’re only 165 lbs at 6’1″ it may be right for you.

If you’ve passed by linear progression (usually, though not always, squat 1RM around 350-400lbs) The Texas Method should work well. Again, there are Texas Method variants that are designed for strength/power athletes.

I’d check out Rip’s book, practical programming (http://www.amazon.com/Practical-Programming-Strength-Training-Rippetoe/dp/0982522754/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1424204617&sr=8-1&keywords=practical+programming). It has a ton of wisdom to help walk you through programming appropriately.

Edit: Didn’t realize you weren’t the OP.

2 points

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19th Aug 2020

Rippetoe’s periodisation book is quite famous, and was well received years ago although I’m not sure how it’s viewed in the powerlifting specific community since i read it ages ago before doing PL

https://www.amazon.com/Practical-Programming-Strength-Training-Rippetoe/dp/0982522754

​

For a specific example – Ed Coans free program is a good one:

https://liftvault.com/programs/powerlifting/ed-coan-peaking-program-spreadsheets/

1 point

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11th Sep 2021

If you only went from 130-225 in 2 years then you absolutely did not follow the program. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0982522754/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_hsch_vamf_tkin_p1_i1

1 point

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9th Jul 2018

> PPST

That is this one, right?

> scientific principles

That is this one, right?

If I were to read only one of them, which should it be? (Just for arguments sake so I know which one to start with since I’ll probably read both)

1 point

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28th Jun 2018

>How is candito different from stronglifts if you know?

Thanks. 🙂 Candito’s variant for Stronglifts would be it’s beginner program, Candito Linear Program. That’s on the site too: http://www.canditotraininghq.com/free-programs/

Basically, there comes a time when you can’t progress linearly, basically, your progress slows down by doing linear programs. That’s when you move to more complicated programs that include "programming". Basically, you need periodization as a intermediate lifter to progress at an acceptable pace. For me that pace is around 5-10kg increase in Squats/DL every 5 weeks. Hope it makes sense.

1 point

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23rd May 2018

Don’t have a link, it’s from Practical Programming For Strength Training, 3rd Edition by Mark Rippetoe and Andy Baker

https://www.amazon.com/Practical-Programming-Strength-Training-Rippetoe/dp/0982522754

The authors discuss it in this forum below:

https://startingstrength.com/resources/forum/mark-rippetoe-q-and-a/54106-svj.html

“The SVJ is valuable precisely because it cannot be effectively trained. It is a test of genetic capacity for explosion. A person of normal athletic body composition will perhaps improve 10-20% over the course of years of training. So it doesn’t really matter when you test it, unless you plan to lose a lot of bodyfat.”

1 point

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25th Feb 2018

Barbell Logic

https://startingstrengthonlinecoaching.com/barbell-logic-podcast/

  • It’s hosted by 2 starting strength coaches

Andy Baker

Practical Programming for Strength Training by Mark Rippetoe and Andy Baker

  • He coauthored the second starting strength book you buy with Mark Rippetoe

Seriously, use a google search before you post.

1 point

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5th Dec 2016

My two cents.
Follow a plan, with a program where you can measure results.
Think yourself as a beginner, start with 5×5 stronglifts.
The book Practical Programming for Strength Training gives you the basic knowledge you need to know. If you only want to be strong and healthy, is all you need to know.

1 point

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10th Jun 2016

>combinar ejercicios, calcular las series y repeticiones y ver las alternativas de ejercicio de peso corporal

Practical Programming for Strength Training.

> Me soba ser Arnold, quiero ver que puedo hacer para marcar los abdominales y listo…
Tengo (entre otros grupos musculares) los abdominales marcados

  • Bajar la proporción de grasa corporal.
  • Ponete de acuerdo, “no es tanta ciencia”.

Sobre estos dibujitos, preguntale a /u/laredpill de dónde los saca. “no es tanta ciencia”.

Lo gracioso es que Rippetoe empieza el libro explicando por qué no hay tanta ciencia. “no es tanta ciencia”.

“no es tanta ciencia”.

1 point

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3rd Jun 2015
1 point

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11th Jan 2015

Yes. Try reading Practical Programming for Strength Training https://www.amazon.com/dp/0982522754/ref=cm_sw_r_awd_AMWSub1F1MJW5 for more on periodization.

1 point

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5th Jan 2015

If you’re looking to throw away money, I could post my Amazon wishlist? If you just want to know about programming in general, Practical Programming is good.

0 points

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11th May 2018

General strength with translate to both wrestling and cycling. Keep doing what you’re doing.

Bench and overhead press are so similar that I wouldn’t do them on the same day. With a 190 bench you should be pressing more than you are. I don’t know of any program that would have you do both on the same day.

You could start messing with the rep scheme though. 3×5 is common. But I’d get more well versed on programming and adaption cycles as a start(or rather practical programming). You could still get some noob strength gains, I think.

0 points

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16th Nov 2014

It depends how much you’re stressing your body on the days you do some phys. Mark Rippetoe’s Practical Programming for Strength Training covers the Stress/Recover/Adapt process quite well.

http://www.amazon.com/Practical-Programming-Strength-Training-Rippetoe/dp/0982522754

-1 points

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4th Apr 2018

Practical Programming is suppose to be good: https://www.amazon.ca/Practical-Programming-Strength-Training-Rippetoe/dp/0982522754

I have recently started to read it and it is quite in depth. Although, I don’t know how credible it still is.

A simpler book, that I do like is ProgrammingToWin: https://www.powerliftingtowin.com/programmingtowin/