What is the opinion of Reddit about the
Melitta Filter Coffee Maker, Single Cup Pour-Over Brewer, Black, 1 Count?

A total of 50 reviews of this product on Reddit.

9 points

·

30th Nov 2016

I think that the complexity of different coffee flavors keep enthusiasts coming back! There are so many nuances in a cup that can change with brewing method and even drink temperature. So, if you’re finding that there’s a lot more to it than a caffeine boost, you’re right! There can be a lot of ritual to your morning cup, and it’s an essential part of my morning. I rotate between two brewing methods: aeropress and pourover. my wife got me a very simple pour-over a couple years ago and I love it: https://www.amazon.com/Melitta-Ready-Single-Coffee-Brewer/dp/B0014CVEH6/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1480523276&sr=8-6&keywords=pour+over
If you’re looking for different brewing methods, you can’t beat this one on price and quality. You can find filters for it on amazon or most grocery stores.

8 points

·

14th May 2021

I have a plastic Melitta plastic pour over “system” that I have had for about 40 years. No moving parts and still works great.

Like this

2 points

·

11th Jul 2018

Yeah, these don’t appear to be affiliate links, just search engine crap Amazon adds on to links depending on how you got there, whether from an old order or a search engine or yes, affiliate links.

BUT, with Amazon specifically, if you strip off everything after the “/dp/product_id/” in the link you’re golden. For example, the single cup brewer you linked to would be
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0014CVEH6/. Do that anytime you list an Amazon link and you’re giving ONLY the product info you want to give without fueling any advertising or affiliate arrangements, and neither you nor your readers ever have to guess at it again. 😀

2 points

·

28th May 2015

Which one do you use? I use one of these, and they work great.

I keep telling people that these are much better than the french press. The french press is overrated in my opinion.

1 point

·

23rd Nov 2021

I’ll echo what everyone’s saying: get rid of the coffee machine.

But I’ll add to it: in the meantime, instead of buying another coffee machine, get an inexpensive filter cone and a stovetop kettle. (I’d normally recommend an electric kettle but I’d worry about roaches getting into the circuitry.) It’s a little bit more work each morning but not a lot and you can be 100% sure your equipment is roach free. (You should keep your coffee in an airtight container anyway, but especially if you have pests.)

1 point

·

25th Feb 2021

This! We were able to boil water in a kettle an I used my cheap Melitta pour over with a cone filter. You can find the pour over here.

They sell those and the filters at HEB. I originally got it for making my own coffee at the office when I got tired of their brand.

1 point

·

26th Mar 2018

For quality of a cup of coffee I feel like a French Press or Pour Over system is best. We prefer the pour over more than the french press because its easier to clean. A percolator is probably the worst way to coffee.

A 2 cup pour over is like $5 and we usually get about 30oz of coffee from one filter. We heat with an MSR Whisperlite, a small gas cartridge lasts so many cups of coffee we haven’t been able to count.

1 point

·

20th Feb 2017

You can get one of these if you’re only interested in making one cup at a time.

1 point

·

18th Aug 2016

this, two ounces (Plus the coffee itself) and by using a chemex filter, its virtually indistinguishable from the best coffee you could hope to make at home. I know you could just use instant, but backpacking is my vacation and there’s nothing in this world like having an incredible cup of coffee while watching the sun rise over the wilderness

1 point

·

8th Mar 2016

Since the OP mentioned being in a dorm, this may be an even better option:

http://www.amazon.com/Melitta-Ready-Single-Coffee-Brewer/dp/B0014CVEH6/

No need to pay extra for the bigger cone or carafe if you’re just gonna be making coffee for yourself – get this little cone and probably have more than enough left on that gift card for a box of #2 filters.

1 point

·

23rd Sep 2015

OP you can get this pour-over cup for ~$5 (if you buy from someone other than amazon you can get free shipping) and coupled with a reusable filter can be pretty good (or so my friends say). I’ve also heard that pour-overs give you the most caffeine.

1 point

·

24th Jun 2015

I’d second the hario mini – otherwise just grind beforehand. I’ve also found that a mini pourover is now my go to when camping. Super light, easy, and I generally do pourover anyway.

1 point

·

10th Jun 2015

I have one of these at work so if I need to make some good coffee quick I can just pull it out of my desk, put some water in the microwave and have good, fresh brewed coffee in <5 min. You will of course need to provide the coffee but I’ve always kept a small amount of pre-groud in a mason jar in my desk for just such an occasion.

1 point

·

17th Apr 2015

True, but you’d probably have to use V60 grinds, temps, and brew times, and at that point you may as well get a V60, lol. With plastic melittas costing only $6, you might as well just get one at that point

1 point

·

4th Mar 2015

I have this I bet you could find one for even cheaper in a thrift store. I also like French presses.

1 point

·

31st Mar 2015

Grounds with only an automatic drip maker?

Maybe take this as an opportunity to get into the world of preparing your own coffee.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0014CVEH6/ref=pd_lpo_sbs_dp_ss_1?pf_rd_p=1944687722&amp;pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&amp;pf_rd_t=201&amp;pf_rd_i=B0049D3UF6&amp;pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;pf_rd_r=095MQ58MVDS0MZ8ZD1AR

This, and filters, will be your only required purchase, assuming you have a kettle. Huge improvement over an automatic drip, because you can control the flow and temperature of the water.

Give it a shot. You can only do some much, though, if the coffee itself is bad.

1 point

·

8th Feb 2015

I have a few different brew devices but I still use this single serve Melitta drip cone very often. It is super cheap, you can probably get it at your local hardware store and sometimes grocery stores carry them, the filters are also cheap and available in grocery stores and it takes only a couple of minutes to brew a single cup.

1 point

·

14th Feb 2015

You seem to have a decent enough grinder for now, maybe try a cheap pourover like

http://www.amazon.com/Melitta-Ready-Single-Coffee-Brewer/dp/B0014CVEH6

Or a Chemex brewer?

If you’ve got the cash, I can personally vouch for the Aeropress, it’s very forgiving with grind consistency, and steep time with most coffee.

1 point

·

3rd Jan 2015

Thanks poolstick, I agree about brew time occurring on its own. Here’s the dripper I use:

Pour over brewer
&nbsp;

Here’s my method:

  • Load 25g coffee into already wet filter/cone. (using a 25g:300g ratio)
  • Place over cup, place on scale, tare.
  • Add about 100g water to bloom, wait 30 seconds for bubbles stop, gasses to escape. (Any less water and the grounds aren’t quite covered.)
  • Add another 100g water, wait for coffee to get close to surfacing, add approx. 100g more, for 300g total.
  • Taste and evaluate.

My water is usually around 200 degrees (using Thermapen instant read).
Bloom usually 30-60 seconds.
Grind size seems to work well (i.e. not too acidic, sour, or bitter – usually).
Real issue is sometimes it can be sour or bitter and other times it’s amazing.

1 point

·

29th Jan 2015

How much of the end of the cup do you drink? With French press, you probably want to stop drinking once you can see the sludge moving with what you’re about to drink.

If it gets bitter before that, it’s probably the grinder giving you too many fines. I used to have a similar set up until relatively recently, but I always drank my coffee with cream. The mini mill will still produce a lot of fines for a French press, just fyi.

Maybe get a super simple Melitta pour over cone? I picked one up for $3 at my local grocery store, and with the paper filter, you won’t have to worry about over extraction with the fines as much.

1 point

·

27th Oct 2011

To be honest, if you want quick and easy, you could consider getting a Melitta. They cost around $4. In the morning I brew one cup, take out the filter and just rinse the Melitta and throw it in the dish drainer. I think its the quickest and easiest way to brew and if you have a burr grinder and use the proper coffee to water ratio, it tastes great.

18 points

·

28th Aug 2019

Yes, ditch it. You’ll get better coffee for less money with less environmental waste from any of the methods suggested here.

I’ll put in my vote for what got me into pour-overs, and which never seems to get much love on this sub: a good old fashioned Melitta drip cone, which makes a more than decent cup of coffee with easily obainable (and cheap) filters with a minimum of fuss. You can pick up a small one that’s perfect for one or two cups for under ten bucks, and a set with a larger cone which also includes a glass carafe (perfect for making multiple cups at once) for not much more than that.

https://www.amazon.com/Melitta-Coffee-Single-Pour-Over-Brewer/dp/B0014CVEH6

https://www.amazon.com/Melitta-640446-Pour-Over-Coffee-Brewer/dp/B0000CFLCT

2 points

·

22nd Jul 2021

Is there any reason the <strong>Melitta Pour-Over</strong> seems to get ignored? None of the coffee sources I follow mention much of it: James Hoffmann, Blue Bottle guides, Stumptown guides, etc, pretty much ignore this brewer.

Any reason these brewer is written off?

Can I make two mugs of coffee with this single-cup brewer?

How might it compare to a Moccamaster?

1 point

·

26th Feb 2022

You could brew it in a french press, but I’d recommend filtering it a second time through a paper filter. For instance, the Melitta (https://www.amazon.com/Melitta-Coffee-Single-Pour-Over-Brewer/dp/B0014CVEH6/) + the filters (https://www.amazon.com/Melitta-Coffee-Filters-White-count/dp/B00006IUTO). Both of these can be bought in most any grocery store in the coffee aisle.

1 point

·

6th Aug 2014

Here’s the manufacturer instructions maybe, no pics, but it sounds right. Here’s the Amazon page which has a little info on it.

1 point

·

29th Jan 2018

OMG I bought this from the grocery store. That and my kettle are a lifesaver at work

1 point

·

20th Oct 2017

I am indeed, i actually use this guy for my coffee and its perfect.

1 point

·

1st Aug 2017

Aeropress is ok, but you can get similar results with a simple single-cup pourover.

You can find one of these plastic filter holders for $3-6 at any big grocery store: https://www.amazon.com/Melitta-Ready-Single-Coffee-Brewer/dp/B0014CVEH6

Then get some #2 paper cone filters which are also very cheap.

The part that gets expensive (if you want it to be!) is a coffee grinder. I have a nice electric one at home that I paid about $300 for. But when I’m on the road I use a hand-grinder: https://www.amazon.com/Hario-Skerton-Ceramic-Coffee-Mill/dp/B001802PIQ. The Hario one is $35 but you can find similar ones for $20.

You could also just spend $10 on a shitty electric blade grinder. The fresh-ground coffee will still taste better than the pre-ground stuff but you might not get full flavor extraction if the grind is inconsistent.

To boil water I use an electric kettle, but you can also just use a propane stove or microwave or whatever you have available. I heat my water to anywhere between 190oF and 205oF, actually boiling water is too hot for coffee.

The most important single thing you can do for awesome coffee is simply grinding the beans fresh and then making the coffee. Everything else that coffee snobs do as part of their coffee ritual don’t add too much more unless you have a really refined palate and are serious about coffee. Some people need to have their beans uniformly ground at the right diameter, use water at an exact temperature, and have a drip process that lasts for a precise amount of time. They aim for consistency so they spend a shitload on expensive grinders and kettles. They’ll only use beans that were roasted within the past week.

But for me, as long as the beans were roasted within the past couple of months (pro-tip: don’t buy a bag of coffee beans if it doesn’t have the roasting date on it), I grind them fresh for coffee, and use water-that-isn’t-boiling-yet, I get a cup I can really enjoy.

1 point

·

22nd Mar 2017

Cheapest I could find: https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B0014CVEH6/ref=twister_B00QGB3OXC?_encoding=UTF8&amp;psc=1

I have this one but I broke the one I have had for yeeeaaaars and the one I bought a few months ago leaked and then broke and the one I got to replace that one has been leaking enough to annoy me

https://smile.amazon.com/Clever-Coffee-Dripper-Large-Ounces/dp/B00EOM5RN0/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1490143395&amp;sr=8-1&amp;keywords=clever+brewer

1 point

·

23rd Jan 2017

By “they all work the same” I was talking about the various pourover cones that take Melitta filters, which is what the OP was asking about. E.g. the Melitta plastic cone, the Melitta porcelain cone, the Bee House Ceramic cone, or many others of that style. I agree that V60 and Chemex are different.

1 point

·

20th Dec 2016

I think pour through is superior

Melitta

1 point

·

19th Sep 2016

<$10 — no moving parts — https://www.amazon.com/Melitta-Ready-Single-Coffee-Brewer/dp/B0014CVEH6

The only negative IMO is the plastic, which I don’t like coming in contact with anything I am going to put in my mouth.

1 point

·

26th Sep 2016

You don’t need a carafe. You can brew directly into a cup/mug. The gooseneck kettle helps reduce the flow of water and direct the stream. If you’re very careful, you can pour slowly out of a pot/tea kettle. It just takes more practice.

The purpose of a scale is to produce repeatable results. Thus if you find 22 grams is too much, next time you can use 20 grams, etc. Same for water.

I’m partial to pour-over as I don’t like full bodied coffees that French Presses produce. I’d recommend as a start, get a pour over you like and a gram scale. If cost is really an issue you can even get a Melitta. It’s cheap and it’s a start (don’t forget filters). To start with, if you don’t have a grinder you can use pre-ground. I actually used a Folgers this weekend in a pour over and it wasn’t horrible. I could taste a difference, but for starting out, it’s better than nothing. (FWIW, I used the Folgers because I was playing with grind sizes.)

As for the grinder, I just bought that grinder. It’s not the best. I also have a Capresso and although it has disc burrs, it seems to produce fewer fines and fewer boulders than the Hario grinder does.

1 point

·

14th Mar 2016

I use one of these, the filters are biodegradable. link

1 point

·

17th Oct 2015

you need this and this

now you got over 90 bucks left. Ur done, ooooooor…. Use that to get a little electric sample roaster. Thrift stores and craigslist you might find one. Im in Toronto, I can prolly find one for $50cdn any day of the week.

1 point

·

10th Oct 2015

I’m not a French Presser so my recco may not be great, but the Idido and Sipaca coffees from CC are incredible on pourover. If you have a bit extra in the budget you could get them a Melitta pour over cone.

$2.99 at BB&B http://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/store/product/melitta-reg-pour-over-single-cup-brewing-cone/1010182077

$5.42 at Amazon
http://www.amazon.com/Melitta-Ready-Single-Coffee-Brewer/dp/B0014CVEH6/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1444502234&amp;sr=8-1&amp;keywords=melitta

1 point

·

14th Aug 2015

There is a variety of single serving coffe makers in which you boil water and pour it over coffee. They cost about $7 on amazon.

link: http://www.amazon.com/Melitta-Ready-Single-Coffee-Brewer/dp/B0014CVEH6

1 point

·

12th Mar 2013

I like this for my coffee fix every day. It can be had for $2.99 in some places. Filters are 100 for $3. Bed bath and Beyond has it for less then Amazon.

I use this for heating up the water for bothe coffee and tea, and hot coco for the kids. $20.

Throw in a little heavy cream, a little sweetener, coffee bliss.

1 point

·

4th Feb 2012

It’s yet ANOTHER unnecessary small appliance, manufactured in China that not only will break in a matter of time and end up in the landfill, but adds to plastic garbage with those cups that have to be used for it – two and a half MILLION of those cups go into the landfill every day. They are stupid and wasteful. Want a single cup of coffee? Do the world a favor and use one of these.

0 points

·

26th Jun 2017

I’d say an Encore will get you the best pour grind for the money.

If you’re diligent on FleaBay you could get one for $65-85 here

Then start with a $6 Melitta or a $20 Hario V60 or anything really

0 points

·

20th Aug 2015
0 points

·

3rd Mar 2014

You could just use a coffee dripper. Cheap, easy to use/clean and makes a perfect cup of coffee with any grounds no matter what size mug you use.

0 points

·

2nd Jun 2014

Here is the magical coffee maker that will beat anything you get out of a college coffee shop: http://www.amazon.com/Melitta-Ready-Single-Coffee-Brewer/dp/B0014CVEH6/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1401696468&amp;sr=8-1&amp;keywords=melitta+coffee+cone

Buy a large airtight mason jar and store your coffee in a cool dark place. Get some nice beans and pregrind them to a “Melitta” grain size, which is very fine. You might think I’m crazy for suggesting pre-grind, but the fact is that (a) you will be going through the beans quickly, and (b) any decent grinder you buy will be very expensive and won’t match an industrial grinder’s evenness or quality. I have never noticed any difference in quality from preground beans that were stored for a few weeks.

Get a water kettle and a measuring spoon. Tailor the amount of grounds you add in to your taste. I usually do 3 tbsp for a cup of coffee. You’ll need the #2 filters from Trader Joe’s.

Edit: also, don’t get a porcelain coffee cone unless you like wasting your time heating it up.

0 points

·

23rd Aug 2011

The number one complaint people have about black coffee is the bitter taste. You are doing it wrong. Most of the bitter taste comes from the rancidness of coffee oil. The most overlooked part being the equipment. Your mug, coffee maker, etc, has to be really clean. Anything that brewed coffee, or coffee grounds, touches will leave behind oil. The oil very quickly gets rancid (within minutes) and contaminates everything. This is a big problem with coffee makers because most people don’t clean the part that holds the grounds and filter or where the brewed coffee drips through, even if they clean the pot. Also, as soon as coffee beans are ground they start going bad. Again, within minutes or hours. You don’t need expensive, fancy brands of coffee or equipment. You need fresh ground coffee and clean equipment. (Also, very hot water.)

I use one of these – http://www.amazon.com/Melitta-640007-Perfect-Brew-Filter/dp/B0014CVEH6 – near boiling water from a kettle, and fresh ground coffee. I can make a strong cup, that is always smooth. It is never bitter, or otherwise difficult to drink.

It also helps to get brown filters. The white ones are bleached, for no good reason, and can add an unpleasant chemical taste in the coffee.

0 points

·

18th Apr 2011

If they were giving the brewer away for free, maybe. As it is, that little fucker is Expensive.

As others have pointed out, you can load your own in the stupid little thing. This has the advantage of causing your cup’o’joe cleanup to not just include “dumping grounds” and “cleaning the screen” but also “unscrewing the capsule” and “dismantling the stupid thing” and “cleaning spilled grounds out of it” and “passing the whole fucking mess under running water” and “setting it out to dry on a towel because the bits are so small they fall through the dish strainer.” In addition, it also limits you 8 oz. of coffee, which I like because having my cup more than half full makes me feel entitled.

Of course, any “single brew” system is going to be extraordinarily complex and radically expensive so I perfectly understand where Keurig is coming from. Thankfully, well-regarded culinary experts fully endorse the complexity of their process.