What is the opinion of Reddit about the
Jiu Jitsu University?

A total of 72 reviews of this product on Reddit.

13 points

·

3rd Mar 2019

Jiu-Jitsu University Paperback – November 17, 2008 by Saulo Ribeiro

​

I am reading / re-reading this one. The whitebelt section helped me a bit. (as whitebelt) 🙂

12 points

·

31st Dec 2018

I started aged 49 with no prior grappling experience, so I know how you feel. I’m just a blue belt, but a couple of things that really helped me:

  • The book Jiu Jitsu University by Saulo Ribeiro is invaluable. This breaks down the fundamental positions, gives you a structure for how to survive, and then escape each basic position (as well as going into more advanced stuff later). It’s a great resource and really transformed and accelerated my learning.
  • There are many online programs, but while you are getting your feet wet, I recommend www.bjjcurriculum.com (you can also find the videos on Youtube) – well organized and free.
  • Mixed classes are great for learning. Don’t be afraid to ask questions (after the roll has ended). You’ll find an amazing number of higher belts willing to help, especially if you’re willing to let them drill moves on you in return.
  • Stay calm, tap early. Avoid being stacked (let them pass if necessary – your neck will thank you).

Good luck!

5 points

·

28th Jul 2016

I started BJJ a few months ago and recently discovered this sub. This is the first I’d heard of this book, so thank you for sharing, /u/Khulo! A quick search for it revealed a lot of praise, so I ventured over to Amazon and ordered it immediately. For others interested, the paperback version is currently at its lowest price ever on Amazon ($20.27). Figured that was worth mentioning!

2 points

·

13th Oct 2016

This was exactly the position I was in as a white belt. What helped me is along the lines of what others said, following the survive->escape->achieve position->attack model, but that’s easier said than done.

First you have to know what a good survival position is in every bad situation. When you’re under side control, it’s blocking the crossface, hiding your far arm, and using your knee to defend the mount. When someone is on your back it’s defending your neck, keeping your elbows tight, scooting low. Pick up Saulo Ribeiro’s Jiu-Jitsu University for detailed instructions on all of the basics in each stage of the progression.

Ideally you should be able to hang out in these positions and defend successfully for a 20-30 seconds. If you really commit to a good survival principles when in bad positions, even as a white belt you can hold off a really advanced guy for a surprisingly long time until he dips deep into his bag of tricks to crack your defense or is able to just brute force his way through your defense. I still practice that against brown and black belts: If they take my back and I can hold off the submission for a good while while they’re actively looking for it, that’s a success. Then the next time I roll with them I can progress to looking for the escape.

2 points

·

5th Nov 2015

Get it. It’s mostly pictures, with descriptive text. It covers every basic position/escape/pass, and some submissions.

If you click on the book cover (“Look inside”), you can check out most of the first chapter. After the initial wall of text, the fun begins with pictures:

http://www.amazon.com/Jiu-Jitsu-University-Saulo-Ribeiro/dp/0981504434

2 points

·

22nd Nov 2015

There is a steep learning curve, but the reward is beyond words. I think a lot of people quit because BJJ challenges the ego ways beyond just the physical. Go in with an open mind and an attitude of learning and you will do well.

If it turns out you really like it… get a copy of Jiu Jitsu University drill and memorize the survival and escape sections over the course of your first 6 months. It’ll accelerate your learning.

Enjoy the class!

2 points

·

7th Oct 2015

Your opponent has mount? Your only goal is to escape mount. Your opponent has your back? You need to get him off of there. Your opponent has passed your guard? You need to get him back in your guard. You need to work on escaping positions and not getting submitted. When your opponent is armbarring you, ask him to go slow and say you want to learn to escape. Saulo’s vision is great on this. You can read all about it in his book http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0981504434?keywords=jiu%20jitsu%20university&qid=1444212361&ref_=sr_1_1&s=books&sr=1-1. It’s an excellent resource.

1 point

·

23rd Aug 2021

https://www.amazon.com/Jiu-Jitsu-University-Saulo-Ribeiro/dp/0981504434/ref=mp_s_a_1_3?dchild=1&keywords=jiu+jitsu+university&qid=1629744647&sr=8-3

Read the first 10 pages of this. Those are your fundamentals, and they work all the way through multi-stripe black belt. Changed my life about 4 years into my BJJ journey.

1 point

·

1st Jan 2021

Ribeiro’s Jiu Jitsu University Book is really good on escapes. Picked that up as a 2 stripe white belt. A few of the escapes are very easy to pick up and were immediately useful. The basic stuff in that book tends to teach concepts that come in handy in far more than one situation.

Tl:dr get this book and read the escapes part. Then try them: https://www.amazon.com/Jiu-Jitsu-University-Saulo-Ribeiro/dp/0981504434

1 point

·

3rd Dec 2020

Get a journal, and write down all the techniques you know. Pick one, and write down how you start the technique, transitions, and then finishing the technique.

Do that for every technique you know, and then cross reference as many as you can with the technique in the book (it’s $9.99 onbKindle) in the following link: https://www.amazon.com/dp/0981504434/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_fabc_N0hYFbM1G6RBH

After that, review every you just researched in that journal. Good luck!

1 point

·

9th Sep 2020

get this book. it is well regarded. very good book.

1 point

·

3rd Jan 2018

Get yourself a copy of Jiu Jitsu University it has a chapter dedicated to survival postures and philosophy.

1 point

·

16th Nov 2016

Practice makes perfect. As you said you only have 2 lessons behind you, upper belts having their way with you is par for the course. If you keep going you will get better. In the meantime order this book, it’ll point you in the right direction.

1 point

·

31st Oct 2016

I suspect you mean Free video’s right? I honestly found that video by accident. I was trying to find more examples of the elbow push escape. But i was happy to find it.

I mainly use youtube and just sort by duration if i’m looking for a longer video.

And if its really specific .. I’ll use reddit and ask a very specific question so i can understand the concepts and terms .. then I google my life away trying to find examples and competition footage.

Finally … that open guard translated concept honestly changed the way I think about my open guard. I’m always making sure i have 4 points of contact now. If i don’t i really try to establish that first before I move on.

I also tend to use BJJ University https://www.amazon.ca/Jiu-Jitsu-University-Saulo-Ribeiro/dp/0981504434

and i’ll youtube his concepts so I can see them in video form.

1 point

·

23rd Jun 2016

Came here to make sure this was mentioned. Derp, of course it is. It’s a nice big book, textbook size with clear photos and great techniques.

Good deal on Amazon, 22 bucks and change. https://www.amazon.com/Jiu-Jitsu-University-Saulo-Ribeiro/dp/0981504434

1 point

·

11th Feb 2016

I know this isn’t a youtube channel but it really really helped me when I was a white belt just starting out Jiujitsu University

1 point

·

8th Jul 2015

Honestly, I think the best options for beginners are the Rafael Lovato DVDs which cover topics more generally, like Guard Mastery and Pressure Passing. However, his marketing team is really shady and they are weird about how and when they make the materials available, and in what form. Never buy any of his stuff unless it is on “sale,” because the normal (artificially inflated) prices are insane.

You’d probably be better off skipping DVDs altogether as a white belt and signing up for BJJ Library, focusing on the videos that correspond with the Ribeiro Brothers’ Jiu Jitsu University, which you can buy in book form on Amazon. Focus solely on that material in both of those forms and you’ll make it to blue in much better form than most of your peers. At that point you’ll have a better idea of what instructionals you might be interested in, and in what form (DVD, book, online subscription, etc.).

1 point

·

26th Mar 2014

Amazon maybe.

Saulo Ribeiro is the author. Jiu-Jitsu University is the title.

Here it is on the Amazon UK website http://www.amazon.co.uk/Jiu-jitsu-University-Saulo-Ribeiro/dp/0981504434/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1395858719&sr=8-1&keywords=jiu-jitsu+university

1 point

·

5th Nov 2014

You need to buy Saulos book:
http://www.amazon.com/Jiu-Jitsu-University-Saulo-Ribeiro/dp/0981504434

It will explain a lot. It is a go to encyclopedia of bjj. I really wish I had bought it sooner. You should just study the first and second chapter for now.

1 point

·

18th Jan 2013

As rand486 was pointing out, there is a great explaination of belt ranks in the book Jiu Jitsu University by Saulo Ribero. I found on Amazon a demo of the book. If you look at pageS 11-12 there is a very clear description of every belt. Hope it helps !

1 point

·

8th Mar 2012

I just got Jiu-Jitsu University and absolutely love it. And you are correct, the white belt section is just survival positions.

I don’t really know what the other sections are focused on as I am not going to read them until I have the corresponding belt.

1 point

·

21st Sep 2012

There’s some really good tips here. My addition would be to tell you to get <em>Jiu-Jitsu University</em> by Saulo Ribeiro.

31 points

·

28th Mar 2018

Good resources for white belts:

Free Books:
Stephan Kesting’s A Roadmap for Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

Free Videos:
Learning Strategies for Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu
Stephan Kesting’s 16 Most Important Techniques for the BJJ Beginner
John B. Will’s 36 Core Techniques
Matt Serra’s four-volume BJJ Basics

For Pay Books:
Saulo Ribeiro’s Jiu-Jitsu University

For Pay Videos:
Jason Scully’s Grapplers Guide
Rener and Ryron Gracie’s Gracie Combatives
Roy Dean’s Blue Belt Requirements, Samples Here

18 points

·

17th May 2019

I found Jiu Jitsu University by Saulo Ribeiro to be very helpful when I first started.

16 points

·

9th Feb 2019

Good resources for white belts:

Free Books

Stephan Kesting’s A Roadmap for Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

Nick “Chewy” Albin’s Focused Jiujitsu

Christian Gruagart’s The Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Globe Trotter

Free Videos

Bruce Hoyer’s Mindset for Learning Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

Stephan Kesting’s 16 Most Important Techniques for the BJJ Beginner

John B. Will’s 36 Core Techniques

Matt Serra’s four-volume BJJ Basics

Roy Dean’s Blue Belt Requirements Sample Clips

Stephan Kesting’s How to Beat the Bigger, Stronger Opponent Sample Clips

Christian Gruagart’s Super Fundamental Principles / White Belt Survival Course

Nick “Chewy” Albin’s White Belt Tips

Inverted Gear’s White Belt Questions, Black Belt Answers

For Pay Books

Saulo Ribeiro’s Jiu-Jitsu University

Renzo Gracie and John Danaher’s Mastering Jujitsu

Kid Peligro’s The Essential Guard

Neil Melanson’s Mastering Triangle Chokes

For Pay Videos

Jason Scully’s Grapplers Guide, my review here, another review

Rener and Ryron Gracie’s Gracie Combatives

16 points

·

24th Nov 2018

Saulo Ribeiro’s Jiu-Jitsu University

Renzo Gracie and John Danaher’s Mastering Jujitsu

Kid Peligro’s The Essential Guard

Neil Melanson’s Mastering Triangle Chokes

16 points

·

29th Jul 2018

Good resources for white belts:

Free Books

Stephan Kesting’s A Roadmap for Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

Free Videos

Bruce Hoyer’s Mindset for Learning Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

Stephan Kesting’s 16 Most Important Techniques for the BJJ Beginner

John B. Will’s 36 Core Techniques

Matt Serra’s four-volume BJJ Basics

Roy Dean’s Blue Belt Requirements Sample Clips

Stephan Kesting’s How to Beat the Bigger, Stronger Opponent Sample Clips

Inverted Gear’s White Belt Questions, Black Belt Answers

For Pay Books

Saulo Ribeiro’s Jiu-Jitsu University

Renzo Gracie and John Danaher’s Mastering Jujitsu

Kid Peligro’s The Essential Guard

Neil Melanson’s Mastering Triangle Chokes

For Pay Videos

Jason Scully’s Grapplers Guide, my review here, another review

Rener and Ryron Gracie’s Gracie Combatives

14 points

·

23rd Dec 2018

Since you saw my post for blue belts, here’s my list for white belts:

Free Books

Stephan Kesting’s A Roadmap for Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

Nick “Chewy” Albin’s Focused Jiujitsu

Christian Gruagart’s The Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Globe Trotter

Free Videos

Bruce Hoyer’s Mindset for Learning Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

Stephan Kesting’s 16 Most Important Techniques for the BJJ Beginner

John B. Will’s 36 Core Techniques

Matt Serra’s four-volume BJJ Basics

Roy Dean’s Blue Belt Requirements Sample Clips

Stephan Kesting’s How to Beat the Bigger, Stronger Opponent Sample Clips

Christian Gruagart’s Super Fundamental Principles / White Belt Survival Course

Nick “Chewy” Albin’s White Belt Tips

Inverted Gear’s White Belt Questions, Black Belt Answers

For Pay Books

Saulo Ribeiro’s Jiu-Jitsu University

Renzo Gracie and John Danaher’s Mastering Jujitsu

Kid Peligro’s The Essential Guard

For Pay Videos

Jason Scully’s Grapplers Guide, my review here, another review

Rener and Ryron Gracie’s Gracie Combatives

14 points

·

1st Sep 2018

Good resources for white belts:

Free Books

Stephan Kesting’s A Roadmap for Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

Free Videos

Bruce Hoyer’s Mindset for Learning Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

Stephan Kesting’s 16 Most Important Techniques for the BJJ Beginner

John B. Will’s 36 Core Techniques

Matt Serra’s four-volume BJJ Basics

Roy Dean’s Blue Belt Requirements Sample Clips

Stephan Kesting’s How to Beat the Bigger, Stronger Opponent Sample Clips

Inverted Gear’s White Belt Questions, Black Belt Answers

For Pay Books

Saulo Ribeiro’s Jiu-Jitsu University

Renzo Gracie and John Danaher’s Mastering Jujitsu

Kid Peligro’s The Essential Guard

Neil Melanson’s Mastering Triangle Chokes

For Pay Videos

Jason Scully’s Grapplers Guide, my review here, another review

Rener and Ryron Gracie’s Gracie Combatives

11 points

·

29th Apr 2018

Good resources for white belts:

Free Books

Stephan Kesting’s A Roadmap for Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

Free Videos

Bruce Hoyer’s Mindset for Learning Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

Stephan Kesting’s 16 Most Important Techniques for the BJJ Beginner

John B. Will’s 36 Core Techniques

Matt Serra’s four-volume BJJ Basics

Inverted Gear’s White Belt Questions, Black Belt Answers

For Pay Books

Saulo Ribeiro’s Jiu-Jitsu University

For Pay Videos

Jason Scully’s Grapplers Guide, my review here

Rener and Ryron Gracie’s Gracie Combatives

Roy Dean’s Blue Belt Requirements, Samples Here

6 points

·

30th Jun 2018

Four of those five books are OOP and command ridiculous prices online. I mean, Passing the Guard second edition is a fine book, but the cheapest price for it on Amazon is the same as that of a new copy of Ryan Hall’s Passing the Guard dvds (with WMA’s permanent 50% discount).

My top three books that are CURRENTLY IN PRINT AND NOT OVERPRICED:

Jiu Jitsu University

Mastering Jujitsu

The Essential Guard

With a bonus fourth suggestion:

Mastering Triangle Chokes

2 points

·

20th Sep 2020

Saulo Ribeiro’s Jiu-Jitsu University

Renzo Gracie and John Danaher’s Mastering Jujitsu

Kid Peligro’s The Essential Guard

Neil Melanson’s Mastering Triangle Chokes

2 points

·

10th Oct 2015
2 points

·

19th Jun 2015

This is a great book, for everything: Jiu Jitsu University – Saulo Ribeiro

2 points

·

18th Feb 2015

Focus on not even letting him get a wrist or getting one of his arms under one of your arms. Go into lock down.

If you’re mounted – stay slightly on your side (one hip off the floor) and use your feet to get half guard while keeping your arms tight to your body and your chin tucked. If you’re in side control – stay on your side and curl up to create space, make yourself small. Never put both shoulder-blades on the floor at the same time. And so on. Emily Kwok has a lot of good stuff on dealing with bigger opponents, like transitional escapes.

I also can’t recommend this book enough: Jiu-jitsu University. I got it at white belt and I still refer to it at least once a week. It’s divided by belt and the white belt section is all survival, it’s awesome.

1 point

·

2nd Jan 2022

Saulo Ribiero’s Jiu-Jitsu University

1 point

·

31st Oct 2021

Saulo Ribiero’s Jiu-Jitsu University

Renzo Gracie and John Danaher’s Mastering Ju Jitsu

Brandon Mullins and Stephan Kesting’s Nonstop Jiu-Jitsu

1 point

·

21st Oct 2021
1 point

·

26th Jul 2021

idk you need a dvd or a book, but This book is amazing.

1 point

·

25th Dec 2019

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BgBI-7U1Xjk&amp;feature=youtu.be&amp;t=572

Ramsey Dewey : one book that I think is absolutely necessary for Brazilian jiu-jitsu practitioners, especially when you’re starting out …

and its $22.99 on Amazon at the moment — so good discount
5 stars with 926 ratings
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0981504434

1 point

·

6th Sep 2020
1 point

·

15th Feb 2020

Jiu Jitsu University by Ribiero. $25 on Amazon. Amazing book packed with full color pictures. Literally thousands of moves.

Jiu-Jitsu University https://www.amazon.com/dp/0981504434/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_ng3rEbZCAYGKB

1 point

·

30th Jan 2019

https://www.amazon.com/Jiu-Jitsu-University-Saulo-Ribeiro/dp/0981504434 This was a big help. We did not have a library on YouTube, so this was revolutionary. What is happening now, with so much info out there, beginners are getting overwhelmed with too many details. There are white belts that are horrible with fundamental movements, but are trying super advanced, flashy moves. Trying is the best way I can describe because they are building on a foundation of sand. Start and stick with the basics. The more advanced shit will come in time. “kids today” have no patience anymore… (I am really not that old.)

1 point

·

5th Jan 2018

This is the video I was talking about:
https://youtu.be/e5283yANkUE

Title of the video is click bait, but along the lines of a “garage mat” I mentioned, with the sentiment you expressed: you’d pay more attention to the correct movement/balance/etc – but I think you’d have to do something with deep instruction, not just YouTube videos.

I’ve Got “Jiu-Jitsu University” (book) in my Amazon cart – it comes highly recommended and would probably be a great supplement to another resource such as an online training like Gracie Combatives.

Jiu-Jitsu University https://www.amazon.com/dp/0981504434/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_Y.5tAb4CXM4MD

I keep mentioning Gracie Combatives because that’s the only one I’m aware of, I’m certain there are others. Would probably be worth a look.

But I’m super new, so take all this with a grain of salt.

Ad in the paper, Craig’s list, flyers, a banner on your house, whatever… do them all!

Or.. maybe… talk to a local dojo? See if they would offer a class with enough interest? I’m on mobile so I can’t see your original post, can’t remember if there were other MA dojos in your area.

1 point

·

3rd Nov 2017

hmmm. Not sure about videos for beginners, but this is what I give all of my friends I convince to start BJJ https://www.amazon.com/Jiu-Jitsu-University-Saulo-Ribeiro/dp/0981504434

1 point

·

31st Oct 2017

If you have the money buy BJJ university by saulo ribeiro-

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Jiu-jitsu-University-Saulo-Ribeiro/dp/0981504434

Read the reviews if your unsure

1 point

·

10th Aug 2017

Like what do you mean by angles? It might have been evident to you but the description you provided is hard to offer advice.

A book since you asked
https://www.amazon.com/Jiu-Jitsu-University-Saulo-Ribeiro/dp/0981504434

It’s awesome imo

1 point

·

27th Oct 2016

First I suggest investing or borrowing a copy of the following

https://www.amazon.ca/Jiu-Jitsu-University-Saulo-Ribeiro/dp/0981504434

I use the method describe inside. which works wonders actually. It really buys you a lot of time and often i don’t feel threatened much while attempting this. Your opponent will frame a lot on his own knees trying to break your posture and regain control.

Here is the video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=79w0ESGQ_So

1 point

·

12th Aug 2016

I read Jiu-Jitsu University on the train ride to class every morning, great book for beginners and escapes.

1 point

·

29th Jul 2016

Pick up a book called BJJ university. Its fantastic and will give you all the essentials you need to survive on the ground.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Jiu-jitsu-University-Saulo-Ribeiro/dp/0981504434

1 point

·

3rd Mar 2016

> What YouTube channels/books do your recommend/trust?

The holy bible of Jiu Jitsu

/u/StephanKesting has run GrappleArts and is a /r/bjj fan favourite around here – his blog and videos are very beginner-friendly.

Just be careful about devouring new stuff at the beginning. It’s not easy to filter the good and the bad stuff at first.

> Would it be better to go bottom and work on my guard?

Honestly, when you’re training with upper belts, you won’t get much of a choice haha. Focus on learning proper movement, how to survive and control each position, and transition between them. Saulo’s book has a phenomenal preamble to the white belt chapter that talks about how it’s all about learning survival, and it rings very true.

1 point

·

14th Jan 2016

Yes, each technique is presented as a sequence of pictures, sometimes from two different angles. Take a look here. You can click on ‘LOOK INSIDE’ to see some sample pages.

1 point

·

10th Dec 2015
  1. Fundamentals class should be teaching you the basics. On top of that, check out /u/Stephenkesting Roadmap for BJJ You can also pick up Jiu Jitsu University.

  2. If you have the time, and are interested in it, then do it. When it comes to getting thrown, it’s an art in itself. A lot of Judo places you’ll spend a lot of classes just learning how to break fall correctly.

1 point

·

22nd Jul 2015

> Just joined a gym (is it called a gym?).

Most of the time, yes.

> I know nothing about BJJ other than watching some UFC. What are some good resources for me to use?

> What major no no’s in the gym?

  • Wash your gi, belt & any other training gear after every use.
  • Try not to spaz (rely only on strength). You’re there to learn during a roll, not “win” the roll.
  • Ask lots of questions after a roll, not during.
1 point

·

17th Jun 2015
1 point

·

30th Apr 2015

I tend to get very depressed as BJJ is therapy for me.

Edit: real advice? Buy this and read the shit out of it, www.amazon.com/dp/0981504434/ref=cm_sw_r_awd_BICqvb1D4RTYK

1 point

·

1st Feb 2015

You will retain very little if you go once a week. Try to go 2-3-2-3 for your 10 lessons.

The biggest part of starting jiu jitsu is learning how your body works. Where your limbs are at all times, how they move, and most importantly, your hips. You’d be surprised how little you understand about your body, when it’s laying on the ground, and you have no grappling experience.

Good first things to learn, even before starting:


Some knowledge from /u/StephanKesting
Get his roadmap at Beginning Brazilian Jiu Jitsu.


Looking for more reading material?


I won’t bog down this post with any more info than that, as you shouldn’t be overloaded with info going in. Work on those three basic beginning movements and just jump right into class.

Bonus videos.

1 point

·

11th Feb 2015

What have you been learning the past month?

  • Are you drilling it?
  • Are you attempting to execute it live?
  • Can you stay after class and drill more?

Buy these two books.

1 point

·

7th Feb 2015

I would reccommend this book. Over the Gracie Combatives.

1 point

·

22nd May 2014

What’s your budget? In order of expense (low to high):

Edit: Additional ideas, also on the more expensive end: Private lesson(s) with the head instructor, or paying his entry to a seminar or tournament.

1 point

·

18th Jul 2014
1 point

·

25th Feb 2014

Seconded, thirded on the change in perspective comments. Small female bjj-er here.

It’s really hard to get submitted again and again and not think of each round as a loss, but it’s also really hard to keep up at this sport with that mentality. A lot of people say to go into jiu jitsu with no ego and beyond the “don’t think you’re a badass” warning, it also applies to making sure you can last in the long run. No one likes to play a game where there’s no reward for progress. Instead of worrying about tapping someone else as a sign of progress, I tried to focus on (and still do) small details that are big basics. Keep elbows in, stay on your side, don’t allow your opponent to flatten you, apply shoulder/chest/face pressure on your opponent.

It might help if your girlfriend could look to critique what opportunities she left open for the opponent (bigger or not) to take advantage of. If she notices some patterns in certain positions or specific chokes she gets submitted to, she might figure out some detail that she’s always forgetting, like letting the opponent get a deep collar grip or leaving her arm out for an easy armbar. It’s frustrating but true that smaller people have to be more perfect with their technique because they can’t power through to achieve the same results, even when skipping some steps or missing certain details. In the end, I think it’s even more gratifying when it does work though.

A training partner recommended Jiu Jitsu University to me. Great book for white belts, emphasizes survival as the primary focus of the white belt stage. Obviously white belts will learn sweeps, chokes and submissions as well, but this book does a great job of highlighting the origins of BJJ and how it’s innately tied to survival against a larger opponent. This helped me a lot through the weeks where I was just getting pounded. Even if I roll with guys and am on the bottom the whole time, as long as I get to hip escape out, get to my side, recompose half or even full guard, I’m pretty happy with myself. Beats getting submitted over and over again!

Tackling frustration with strength disadvantage by trying to go against even more resistance will just squash the fun out of her bjj training and not give her the opportunity to really hone the technique which will help her improve the most. Granted, I’m lucky enough to train at a place with a good number of women and small men, so I always have a large range of partners. But I agree with clumsygremlin that rolling with higher belts that are more aware of their strength and control will be more helpful than asking you to go with more of your strength.

TL;DR Also a small lady here. Focusing on survival, technique, and thinking of tapping less as losing and more as a point of reflection have made me pretty happy overall with my progress. I hope your girlfriend finds a good balance and keeps at it through the frustration!

1 point

·

11th May 2013

The short answer is no, I would say that is not how Judo is usually taught. It could be that the instructors are inexperienced, or they may not try to invest too much time into new people until they are sure that you’ll stick around. It’s unfortunate but sometimes clubs do this because this sport is difficult and rough physically, so the turnover rate is a little high. That said it probably isn’t grounds for leaving the club, as it may have a lot to offer. Try asking the instructors specifically what you want to work on, maybe they’ll be more likely to help you.

Here are some resources to help you along. If you find a technique that looks interesting, write down the name so you can ask your instructor in class on how to do it.

The Difficult Way is a blog that has some really helpful stuff for beginners/intermediates.

JudoInfo Has a few basic resources such as lists of throws, descriptions and pictures of techniques and etiquette.

Here’s a section on Basic gripping from Mike Swain, though the whole video is good. If you want more advanced gripping techniques, you should check out Jimmy Pedro’s Grip like a World Champion DVD.

Edit: Also if you want more help in Ne-Waza (Ground Play) I would recommend the book Jiu-Jitsu University by Saulo Ribeiro, as it’s very comprehensive.

1 point

·

22nd Mar 2013

Lots of good advice here already, but want to emphasize. You’ll start to feel things clicking at about 4-5 months. You will NOT be good, but I’m about 6 months in and finally starting to SEE things, even if I can’t prevent them, execute them, or escape them.

Some things to focus on now:

  • Breathing. Be conscious of it. You’ll keep holding your breath, but if you are thinking about it, you’ll be able to start improving that.
  • Don’t use all your strength. You’ll grow much more quickly by learning to use proper technique and your brain than muscling technique and forcing things. This will also get you better mileage out of your gas tank.
  • Don’t worry about losing, giving position, or getting submitted. Focus on working a couple techniques and positions at a time until you find your body doing it automatically at the appropriate times. Then keep focusing on them and tweaking as needed.
  • Buy this book immediately. It has a very good section on basic concepts for various positions. Instead of being all “wtf do I do now”, I at least have a basic idea of what I need to achieve. Examples: Someone gets your back? Protect your neck, get your back to the mat.
  • Keep your hips moving, even if you are going the wrong way, it’s usually better to be active as it will disrupt attacks.
  • If someone is passing, ACCEPT it, DO NOT fight it. You’ll be better off right now focusing on setting up proper defense for the next position.
  • Remove expectations of tapping anyone. If you have already, it’s almost unfeasible that you got it because they gave it to you. Think about it. Would this be a worthwhile long term investment if after 2 – 3 years some noob could come in and beat you with 2 months of training???

This is what I’ve learned in my short time. There are certainly instances where this advice is wrong, but I hope it gives you something to work on and mitigate that “wtf is happening, wat do i doooo” feeling you’re having. To be fair though, you’re going to feel that to an extent for a very long time. I sure as shit still do.

1 point

·

4th Jul 2012

I’ve heard this book is good. But it’s expensive and I don’t know anything so I wonder if it is.

1 point

·

5th Jul 2012
0 points

·

27th Jan 2015