What is the opinion of Reddit about the
Hario V60 Ceramic Coffee Dripper Pour Over Cone Coffee Maker Size 02, White?

A total of 37 reviews of this product on Reddit.

14 points

·

14th Feb 2019

Not a shill for Amazon I promise, but I think this is really all you need.

Hario V60 Ceramic Coffee Dripper, Size 02, White https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000P4D5HG/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_gXyzCbNQG9JHC

very inexpensive option just as good as anything else. Probably the only thing you want to make sure is that it’s not plastic, but rather ceramic.

3 points

·

23rd Feb 2021

Valve? This is it. I certainly don’t think it tastes under extracted, tbh I can barely taste a difference between chemex and V60, I mean I would make the coffee the same way for both

2 points

·

12th Mar 2021

The Keurig was an awful invention. K-cups are ridiculously priced and a huge source of plastic waste. And the coffee it makes is comparable to or worse than a regular drip machine, which is already pretty bad.

Honestly I just use a Hario V60 with an electric kettle. Makes an amazing cup like you’d get at a cafe. Sure you have to spend a little more time brewing it instead of hitting a button and jogging off, but spending a few minutes in the morning brewing a cuppa is honestly kind of a nice start to the day so I don’t mind.

1 point

·

11th Oct 2021

WELL ACTUALLY…. if you’re getting grounds from your french press then the filter isn’t doing it’s job or the coffee is being ground too finely. It may be time to get a new press.

And pour overs are a great way to enjoy coffee and can be better tasting than french press coffee (not to mention faster to make too.) I’m not sure why your husband is against pour overs. They are super cheap, just pick one up. I recommend this one: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000P4D5HG/ref=sbl_dpx_kitchen-coffee-appliances_B000P4D5HG_0

You can go cheaper than that as well but that’s a solid one.

1 point

·

9th Jan 2021

I have this pour over and I find it so much better than doing Keurig. It wouldn’t take up any more space really if you already have a kettle for tea and is just as fast as the Keurig IMO.

1 point

·

31st Dec 2017

Try ordering some from a local or regional roaster’s website. Get whole bean coffee, a cheap grinder, small electric kettle, and something like this to brew with. You should be able to make some pretty good coffee at college with that. If you like it you can always upgrade the equipment later.

1 point

·

17th Nov 2016

If you’re looking to just brew yourself a cup a day or if you’re the only one going to be drinking it, you could totally go with a Hario V60 and buy yourself a cheap little gooseneck kettle (not terribly necessary but adds convenience)

https://www.amazon.com/Hario-VDC-02W-Ceramic-Coffee-Dripper/dp/B000P4D5HG

You can just pop it on top of a mug and brew direct!

1 point

·

18th Oct 2016

This rabbit hole can go as deep as you want it, but here are a few quick tips:

  • Only grind what you need for that day. The beans lose their freshness pretty quick after being ground.
  • Let the boiling water cool for about 30 seconds before you start brewing.
  • If you’re ever ready to buy more gear, a hand-crank burr grinder (usually < $50) will make a big improvement in how well your brew goes.

I, personally, don’t like french press as much because it’s tough to clean out all the grounds. I like the Hario V60 because you can just remove the filter when you’re done. But if you’re digging the french press, keep using it!

1 point

·

6th Aug 2016

It’s a really easy and cheap method; you may have done it before and not even really known. All you need is a kettle, one of these (doesn’t have to be ceramic; I use plastic), and a cone filter. Put the coffee in the filter and literally pour the hot water over the coffee, slowly and evenly. Makes a great cup.

1 point

·

4th Jan 2016

You would be wasting it …you have to simmer(light boil) the kratom and water in a pan on the stove for at least 10 min .. Usually start with around 8 grams depending how strong the kratom is …I use one of these to strain it http://www.amazon.com/Hario-VDC-02W-Ceramic-Coffee-Dripper/dp/B000P4D5HG …After your tea drains into your cup throw the kratom in for another light boil to ensure you have extracted all the alkaloids also make sure to squeeze filter and get all the liquids out

1 point

·

27th Jun 2015

Yeah OP needs to change his marketing. Instead of explaining how this product is better than other drips like this he just pretends they don’t exists and tells us he came up with the method him self.

If you just want to support start up companies you are better off buying the hario and donating the forty dollars you saved directly to the company

1 point

·

26th Jan 2015

Harios can be less than 20 bucks Seems like a reasonable cost for an experiment. If you’re not into it, pass it on!

Also, are you using a gooseneck kettle and coffee scale? Good things to have around.

1 point

·

30th Jul 2011

I dont think you’ll find one easily. Plastic is just so much easier to make those moving parts with..

This though… I am a fan of.
http://www.amazon.com/Hario-VDC-02W-Dripper-Ceramic-Funnel/dp/B000P4D5HG/ref=pd_sim_k_6
Not quite the same but it makes a damn good cup of coffee.

40 points

·

10th Sep 2018

Hario V60+Filters, Bonivita Electric Kettle (or any goose neck kettle), a kitchen scale that reads in grams, a stop watch/timer, and some coffee. Done. If you have the extra money get an electric burr grinder, if not just have the roaster or wherever you buy the coffee pre-grind it for pour over.

edit: Added some Amazon links in so people can see prices.

5 points

·

26th Feb 2021
3 points

·

28th Aug 2020

I use a V60.2 that u/Cledus_Snow suggested for me!

2 points

·

12th Oct 2016

French press is my preferred. Once upon a time the wise HoveringDog taught me the art of coffee making by letting the beans bloom for about a minute before adding in the water, slowly, evenly, and in a circular motion to disrupt the grounds.

Basically you bloom the grounds by pouring on just enough water to wet them all, give a little stir and steep for about a min. You’ll see a rich and creamy froth or crema form. This apparently opens them up for more h20 penetration or something?

So for hot coffee french press is still my go to. My prefered is cold pressed that I then reheat because the flavour is better but it takes 24 hours in the fridge and uses more coffee (it makes a stronger brew that you can then use less of the end product dilute with water or almond milk etc) but I haven’t gotten to a point in my life where I can reliably cold press.

Currently I am using a crappy cone filter coffee maker I unboxed from my unassertive days. Personally the only cone filter coffee contraption I like is those 1 cup pour overs, even the cheapo plastic ones produce good single cup results here is a fancier one.

If you go the automatic route, I would look for a basket shaped filter model because they seem to have more success with reusable mesh filters and just less hassle to clean.

While I in no way recommend my current model, my old fancy roommate had a Breville that I liked and spent many mornings with. I can’t seem to find it on amazon currently, it didn’t grind coffee (I have never use a machine with built in grinder, it seems like a good idea but I would love to hear others experiences) 14cup black/silver and programmable. It looks sharp and allowed for programmable brew time which meant I had to grind beans the night before but waking up to the smell of coffee without the overnight guest was nice.

I have heard awesome things about fancy gravity machines and the areopress is on my coffee wish list

2 points

·

17th Feb 2015

I’ll go out on a limb; I don’t like the Aeropress. It makes a stronger, espresso-like beverage, and I think the flavors are more muted than in any other brewing method I’ve tried. I think the Hario v60 ($11 for the Tanors knock off, and $17 for the genuine article) is the best bang for your buck. My favorite is the Chemex ($60 for the 8-cup on Amazon, but $40 at Peet’s). The Chemex has the thickest filter, and will give the cleanest, brightest cup. The classic immersion style is the French Press ($40 or so), which gives a velvety full cup. Slightly less velvety is the Clever Dripper ($20), which adds a paper filter to the process. Lots of people swear by the Aeropress; I’m just not a huge fan.

Your biggest up-front cost will be a grinder. You will be shocked at how much a good grinder matters. If you want to make any of the above kinds of coffee more a year or more, you’ll want a $100 conical burr grinder. (I have this one, and I love it.)

You’ll also need a tea kettle for any of these. I just have a boring old one, but the industry standard is a gooseneck kettle like the Bona Vita.

2 points

·

14th Feb 2015

There are two ways to go. One way is with a pour-over style, and one way is with an immersion. The most popular pour over styles are the Hario v60 ($11 for the Tanors knock off, and $17 for the genuine article) and the Chemex ($60 for the 8-cup on Amazon, but $40 at Peet’s). The Chemex has the thickest filter, and will give the cleanest, brightest cup. The v60 is better than the Melitta cone because it’s a true cone rather than a flat bottom, so you get better extraction. The classic immersion style is the French Press ($40 or so), which gives a velvety full cup. Slightly less velvety is the Clever Dripper ($20), which adds a paper filter to the process. Lots of people swear by the Aeropress, which makes a stronger, espresso-like beverage; I’m not a huge fan.

Your biggest up-front cost will be a grinder. You will be shocked at how much a good grinder matters. I don’t know what kind of grinder the Krups you have is, but you’ll want a $100 conical burr grinder. (I have this one, and I love it.)

You’ll also need a tea kettle for any of these. I just have a boring old one, but the industry standard is a gooseneck kettle like the Bona Vita.

But after you invest about $200 on all these things, you’ve got all you need forever, and you can buy any beans your heart desires and make coffee as good as you’ll find in the best third-wave coffee shops.

I can’t help you with beans; I lived in LA before I loved coffee, so I was fine going to Starbucks and It’s A Grind. But I’m sure someone can help you. I hear great things about Rose Park Coffee Roasters in Long Beach, though.

1 point

·

3rd Feb 2022

I have a Hario VDC-02W V60 Ceramic Dripper with Crucial metal cone.

All the instructions I read say to pour water gently in a spiral from the centre outwards.

But never to try and (presumably ‘recover’ grounds) from the inside edge of the cone itself when pouring?

Why is that, please: to avoid reducing the temperature of the pouring water?

TIA!

1 point

·

6th Nov 2021

Hario V60 Ceramic Coffee Dripper, Size 02, White https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000P4D5HG/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_glt_fabc_6J2WJMHGAP32KQHNZXKQ?_encoding=UTF8&amp;psc=1

Is this the pour over you use? Or is it a different one

1 point

·

13th Oct 2021
ItemCurrentLowestReviews
Hario V60 Ceramic Coffee Dripper, Size 02, White$23.50$23.504.8/5.0

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1 point

·

12th Oct 2021
ItemCurrentLowestReviews
Hario V60 Ceramic Coffee Dripper, Size 02, White$20.92$20.924.8/5.0

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^Item&amp;nbsp;Info&nbsp;|&nbsp;Bot&amp;nbsp;Info&nbsp;|&nbsp;Trigger

1 point

·

6th Dec 2020

Hey there friend. I have two possible suggestions depending on what you define as “low waste”.

If by “low waste” you mean “easy to clean up” then why not go for a traditional pour over? The clean up is much like a traditional drip brew, and it’s a relatively fast way to get yourself a nice single person serving of coffee in the morning.

If by “low waste” you mean “doesn’t produce trash” then I recommend using a siphon brew with a butane burner. I have found this method to produce the strongest coffee without dipping into espresso territory. It uses reusable cloth filters as the only disposable, which you can switch out every few months. The only major downside is that unless you’re particularly confident in your pipes, you’re going to have to scoop out the grounds manually into the trash/compost as the recommended larger grind size doesn’t play nicely with older kitchen sinks.

1 point

·

26th Sep 2020

> I brew my morning coffee by boiling water in a pot on the stove and pouring it over some default instant coffee from the supermarket.

You have the technique down for amazing coffee then. All you need is a Hario V60, some filters, and some good beans.

The brew method is basically what you are doing now. Put some ground coffee in the filter. Pour water over top a few times. Drink.

I used to be a huge Aeropress fan but I found the V60 even less work and gave me the same delicious results.

1 point

·

14th Apr 2018

Get this and these filters for doing pourover.

You might also want this grinder, unless you want to have your local shop grind for you as well, which they will. Tell them you’re grinding for pourover so they’ll know how coarse.

If you decide to also get the presspot, you’ll need to grind differently for that, which is why I recommend buying the grinder also. Not to mention, it’s super helpful to be able to grind your own, so you can dial in your brews. Additionally, whole beans stay fresh longer than ground coffee. You’ll definitely notice a difference between fresh ground and the very end of a bag of ground coffee.

All you need other than that is a way to heat water, and some beans. Do you have a kettle of some sort? Stovetop or electric will work. You want to avoid using your keurig to make hot water, as it doesn’t get hot enough.

1 point

·

14th Apr 2018

This and this for starters?

1 point

·

18th Mar 2017

/u/kidneycook had a great idea on the wood fire, but I do know that cooking indoors with wood is an issue, and weather is always an issue.

I tried to suggest things that can be scaled up from camping gear, and are easy as hell to clean plus cheap to replace.

Was on mobile before, so couldn’t give links, but starting from coffee down:

http://www.swagbucks.com/?t=w&amp;p=1&amp;q=aeropress
Great for coffee, doesn’t scale up well (you’d have to have one for each espresso, takes a while), but pour over is certainly in, and the https://www.amazon.com/Hario-Ceramic-Coffee-Dripper-White/dp/B000P4D5HG can be made of plastic, knock off chinese, and you can use stainless filters or paper, your choice.

Koreans use a grill top on gas burners, and you can get a flat plate griddle/roaster pan. I’ve seen them cover two burners, but I can’t find a link right now.

And the thing about the Dutch ovens is they can keep the bread moist while baking. And you can go totally cheap, non-enameled. I love Lodge and Le Creuset, but knock off versions are still cast iron. I just think your biggest issue is going to be finding good flour, might have to get with a distributor or a large hotel buyer or something.

http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/2017/02/21/bread-baking-dutch-oven/

1 point

·

3rd Apr 2016

I use a 3 cup of water to 1 cup of coffee ratio using 9 of these mason jars:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/91Uj70fYYYL._SX522_.jpg

i filter the grounds using this: http://www.amazon.com/Hario-VDC-02W-Ceramic-Coffee-Dripper/dp/B000P4D5HG

then i pour all 9 jars worth of coffee into a 2 gallon Omega-Jar.

1 point

·

2nd Jan 2016

Ceramic is only $15, filters are ~ $7 for 100. And you can just brew onto a 32 or 16 ounce glass mason jar if you don’t want to buy a hario carafe. Fits well on a scale.

http://www.amazon.com/Hario-VDC-02W-Ceramic-Coffee-Dripper/dp/B000P4D5HG

1 point

·

4th Sep 2015

Well, it operates like any other pour-over cones like the Hario or Melitta. I guess the main difference is that it has a shut-off valve that allows you to close off the bottom like the Clever Dripper and that it’s porcelain instead of plastic.

I usually make my coffee using a pour-over (imo the best way to make it) which doesn’t have a shut-off valve so I can’t comment on what the benefits of it are. I imagine you could use the shut-off valve either to extract the coffee longer or else brew the coffee and then transfer it to a cup later (rather than having the cup below while you’re brewing it). Personally I’m perfectly happy with the brew strength of my pour-over WITHOUT having a shut-off valve but others might feel differently?

1 point

·

22nd Feb 2015

For excellent coffee, you need four things: good water, freshly roasted beans, a good grinder, and a proven method.

Water: a cup of coffee is 98% water, so if you use bad water, you’ll get bad coffee. Also, perhaps surprisingly, if you use boring water, you’ll get boring coffee. So: don’t use distilled water, but don’t use tap water (if you don’t like the taste of your tap water). Filtered water or spring water will do just fine.

Fresh roast: Coffee begins to go stale as soon as it loses the protective layer of CO2, which is between 24 and 72 hours after roasting.

Fresh grind: Grinding coffee accelerates the process of going stale, exposing every part of the coffee bean to oxygen, and drying out the oils. You should grind as soon before making coffee as possible; some people even suggest that five minutes is too long. As far as grinders go, the best is a conical burr grinder — it gives the most consistent ground coffee particles with the fewest amount of fine particles and large particles. I use a Baratza Encore, and I love it. A flat disc grinder is the next best, followed by a blade grinder.

Method: There are tons. My favorites are the Chemex and the French Press, and I’ll use different ones depending on the bean. Brew guides can be found in lots of places; mine are here.

There are basically two ways to go. One way is with a pour-over style, and one way is with an immersion. The most popular pour over styles are the Hario v60 ($11 for the Tanors knock off, and $17 for the genuine article) and the Chemex ($60 for the 8-cup on Amazon, but $40 at Peet’s). The Chemex has the thickest filter, and will give the cleanest, brightest cup. The v60 is better than the Melitta cone because it’s a true cone rather than a flat bottom, so you get better extraction. The classic immersion style is the French Press ($40 or so), which gives a velvety full cup. Slightly less velvety is the Clever Dripper ($20), which adds a paper filter to the process. Lots of people swear by the Aeropress, which makes a stronger, espresso-like beverage; I’m not a huge fan.

Your biggest up-front cost will be a grinder. You will be shocked at how much a good grinder matters. You’ll want a $100 conical burr grinder. (I have this one, and I love it.)

You’ll also need a tea kettle for any of these. I just have a boring old one, but the industry standard is a gooseneck kettle like the Bona Vita.

But after you invest about $200 on all these things, you’ve got all you need forever, and you can buy any beans your heart desires and make coffee as good as you’ll find in the best third-wave coffee shops.

Sorry for the wall of text! I can provide a tl;dr if you’d prefer.

1 point

·

18th Sep 2011

Just barely over a bill, but…
This and this do the trick for me. You always want to splurge for the grinder to allow for more brewing options down the line.

0 points

·

26th Jun 2018

You can try a Chemex filter in a drip cone. It takes a little longer to boil water and pour over, but cleanup is super easy. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000P4D5HG/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_LfLmBbD4F9FW2

-2 points

·

10th Sep 2018

Its really not that hard. Making coffee is still in the realm of cooking. The difference between a Keurig system and a enthusiast setup is the same as someone with a George Foreman grill and a pit master, albeit much cheaper.

Essentials:

Pour Over System of your choice+Filters

Goose Neck Kettle

Not Essential but somewhat important:

Kitchen Scale for the proper beans to water ratio.

Burr Grinder for the best grind at home.

-3 points

·

1st May 2021

Do you really want to go from instant to espresso? You might want to try pour overs using a Hario V60 setup. https://www.amazon.com/Hario-Ceramic-Coffee-Dripper-White/dp/B000P4D5HG You’ll need a kettle and scale, but you should stay well under your budget. There is a ton of info on what you will need and how to do it.

Chemex is another option.