What is the opinion of Reddit about the
Bigger Leaner Stronger: The Simple Science of Building the Ultimate Male Body?

A total of 33 reviews of this product on Reddit.

1 point

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17th Jan 2017

I started out with the plan detailed in Bigger Leaner Stronger by Mike Matthews. He will lay out everything you need to know about diet and exercise as a beginner. In my opinion, this program is better than stronglifts.

buy the book

or you can usually find it with a pdf search.

This book helped me gain 20lbs of muscle in my first half year.

Good Luck!

1 point

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24th Aug 2016

Sure you can download myfitnesspal, or go on reddit lose it. But its extremely difficult to gather all the important information you need and THEN implementing it. Its easier said than done.. If your really serious about dropping weight which can potentially save your life, Search up bigger leaner stronger by Mike MATHEWS. Omg that book has everything you need to help you lose wight AND Gain muscle. Explains why some people fail at getting their fitness goals, The type of mindset that you will need. Meal plans, workout routines, Fitness myths. The book cost 13.62$ If you buy the book today, you’ll be thanking yourself a year from now that you have started. Here’s the link https://www.amazon.com/Bigger-Leaner-Stronger-Building-Ultimate/dp/1938895274/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=

The choice is yours.

1 point

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30th Dec 2015

Bigger, Stronger, Leaner has a good chunk of information about diet and nutrition before it goes into strength training. Overall a great read if you want to have a goal of being healthy and looking good.

Bigger Leaner Stronger: The Simple Science of Building the Ultimate Male Body https://www.amazon.com/dp/1938895274/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_awd_OGcHwbWPS7024

1 point

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13th Oct 2015

Check out Bigger, Leaner, Stronger for all of the basic and intermediary info on weightlifting like the best way to warm-up, eat, etc. Some guys just learn as they go and they do fine but others learn bad form, or don’t warm-up properly like I did for years, and will cause damage/impingements to joints. So it’s very important to read an up to date primer on lifting.

http://www.amazon.com/Bigger-Leaner-Stronger-Building-Ultimate/dp/1938895274

1 point

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19th Aug 2015

Sure. It took just under a year, although in reality most of the results came in the last 6 months when I got a little more serious about nutrition and workout routine after reading a book. I mostly followed the routine laid out in this book Bigger Leaner Stronger and followed the general nutrition advice. It is basically a 5 day split in the strength rep range of 4-6 (which can be altered to 4 or 3 days) which lets you go fairly hard at each body part as there is a long recovery period. This worked well with my desire to always push to muscle failure. It is also quite easy in that you can complete most workouts in 45 minutes as there at most 12 sets (3 sets of 4 exercises) for the novice phase. Now that I’ve been doing it for a while and are a little more knowledgeable I’m starting to mix in some more advanced techniques such as reverse pryamids, hypertrophy weeks, deload/recovery weeks etc.

1 point

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13th Apr 2015

>How Often You Should Do io?

>In terms of frequency, here’s how I do it:

>* When I’m bulking, I do two 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>* When I’m cutting, I do three to five 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>* When I’m maintaining, I do two to three 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>* I never do more than five cardio sessions per week, as I’ve found my strength begins to drop off in the gym if I do.

Matthews, Michael (2014-01-05). Bigger Leaner Stronger: The Simple Science of Building the Ultimate Male Body (The Build Muscle, Get Lean, and Stay Healthy Series Book 1) (pp. 161-162). Oculus Publishers, Inc.. Kindle Edition.

1 point

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30th Apr 2015

>HOW OFTEN YOU SHOULD DO CARDIO

>In terms of frequency, here’s how I do it:

>* When I’m bulking, I do two 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>* When I’m cutting, I do three to five 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>* When I’m maintaining, I do two to three 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>* I never do more than five cardio sessions per week, as I’ve found my strength begins to drop off in the gym if I do.


Matthews, Michael (2014-01-05). Bigger Leaner Stronger: The Simple Science of Building the Ultimate Male Body (The Build Muscle, Get Lean, and Stay Healthy Series Book 1) (p. 161). Oculus Publishers, Inc.. Kindle Edition.

1 point

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13th Apr 2015

>How Often You Should Do io?

>In terms of frequency, here’s how I do it:

>* When I’m bulking, I do two 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>* When I’m cutting, I do three to five 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>* When I’m maintaining, I do two to three 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>* I never do more than five cardio sessions per week, as I’ve found my strength begins to drop off in the gym if I do.

>Many people are shocked to learn that I do no more than 1.5 to 2 hours of cardio per week while cutting but am able to get to the 6 to 7 percent body fat range with ease. Well, the idea that you have to do a ton of cardio to get shredded is a complete myth. It’s not only unnecessary but unhealthy as well.

>You don’t have to do cardio to lose fat, but if you want to get down to the 10 percent range or below, I can pretty much guarantee you’ll have to do at least two to three sessions per week.

>If you’d like to stick with steady-state cardio or include it in your routine, stick with the frequency recommendations given above. You can mix and match modalities (HIIT vs low-intensity steady-state, or LISS) but I still wouldn’t do more than five sessions per week.

Matthews, Michael (2014-01-05). Bigger Leaner Stronger: The Simple Science of Building the Ultimate Male Body (The Build Muscle, Get Lean, and Stay Healthy Series Book 1) (pp. 161-162). Oculus Publishers, Inc.. Kindle Edition.

1 point

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30th Apr 2015

>HOW OFTEN YOU SHOULD DO CARDIO

>In terms of frequency, here’s how I do it:

>* When I’m bulking, I do two 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>* When I’m cutting, I do three to five 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>* When I’m maintaining, I do two to three 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>I never do more than five cardio sessions per week, as I’ve found my strength begins to drop off in the gym if I do.

Matthews, Michael (2014-01-05). Bigger Leaner Stronger: The Simple Science of Building the Ultimate Male Body (The Build Muscle, Get Lean, and Stay Healthy Series Book 1) (p. 161). Oculus Publishers, Inc.. Kindle Edition.

1 point

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27th Mar 2016

Order this book and read it.

Bigger, Leaner, Stronger

1 point

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5th Oct 2015

1)

><em>CUTTING 101: HOW TO EAT FOR MAXIMUM FAT LOSS</em>


2)

>HOW OFTEN YOU SHOULD DO CARDIO?

>In terms of frequency, here’s how I do it:

>* When I’m bulking, I do two 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>* When I’m cutting, I do three to five 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>* When I’m maintaining, I do two to three 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>I never do more than five cardio sessions per week, as I’ve found my strength begins to drop off in the gym if I do.


3)

>DOES ANYTHING CHANGE WHEN CUTTING?

>One of many terrible pieces of training advice I hear among the “bros” is to train with light weights and high reps when cutting to “bring out the cuts.”

>This is 100 percent wrong.

>Focusing exclusively on high-rep training doesn’t help burn more fat than heavier weights. It doesn’t “shred you up,” nor does it make you vascular.

>Ironically, training heavy is especially important when you’re cutting because the name of the game is muscle preservation, and you need to keep overloading the muscles to accomplish this.

>So train hard when you’re cutting and keep trying to go up in strength. Most guys experience an initial drop in strength when they switch from a bulk to a cut, but I’ve always managed to build my strength back up and end more or less where I began with little to no muscle loss (if I do lose any muscle when I cut, I can’t see it in the mirror).

Matthews, Michael (2014-01-05). Bigger Leaner Stronger: The Simple Science of Building the Ultimate Male Body (The Build Muscle, Get Lean, and Stay Healthy Series Book 1) (p. 161). Oculus Publishers, Inc.. Kindle Edition.

1 point

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28th Oct 2015

>Now…let’s take a look at the benefits of eating adequate amounts of carbohydrate, starting with insulin’s role in supporting muscle growth.

>You see, insulin doesn’t directly induce protein synthesis like amino acids do, but it does have anti-catabolic properties. 80 What that means is when insulin levels are elevated, the rate at which muscle proteins are broken down decreases. This, in turn, creates a more anabolic environment in which muscles can grow larger more quickly. 81

>That sounds good in theory, right? But does it pan out in clinical research? Yup. Several studies conclusively show that high-carbohydrate diets are superior to low-carbohydrate varieties for building muscle and strength.

>For example, researchers at Ball State University found that low muscle glycogen levels (which are inevitable with low-carbohydrate dieting) impair post-workout cell signaling related to muscle growth. 82

>A study conducted by researchers at the University of North Carolina found that when combined with daily exercise, a low-carbohydrate diet increased resting cortisol levels and decreased free testosterone levels. 83 (Cortisol, by the way, is a hormone that breaks tissues, including muscle, down. In terms of maximizing muscle growth, you want low resting cortisol levels and high free testosterone levels.)

>These studies help explain the findings of a study conducted by researchers at the University of Rhode Island that looked at how low- and high-carbohydrate intakes affected exercise-induced muscle damage, strength recovery, and whole-body protein metabolism after a strenuous workout. 84

>The results showed the subjects on the low-carbohydrate diet (which wasn’t all that low— about 226 grams per day, versus 353 grams per day for the high-carbohydrate group) lost more strength, recovered more slowly, and showed lower levels of protein synthesis.

>Similar results were demonstrated by a study conducted by researchers at McMaster University, which compared high- and low-carbohydrate dieting with subjects performing daily leg workouts. 85 They found that those on the low-carbohydrate diet experienced higher rates of protein breakdown and lower rates of protein synthesis, resulting in less overall muscle growth than their higher-carbohydrate counterparts.

Matthews, Michael (2014-01-05). Bigger Leaner Stronger: The Simple Science of Building the Ultimate Male Body (The Build Muscle, Get Lean, and Stay Healthy Series Book 1) (p. 95). Oculus Publishers, Inc.. Kindle Edition.


80 – &quot;Insulin and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I Enhance Human Skeletal Muscle Protein Anabolism during Hyperaminoacidemia by Different Mechanisms&quot;

81 – &quot;Proteolysis in Skeletal Muscle and Whole Body in Response to Euglycemic Hyperinsulinemia in Normal Adults&quot;

82 – &quot;Influence of muscle glycogen availability on ERK1/2 and Akt signaling after resistance exercise in human skeletal muscle.&quot;

83 – &quot;Influence of dietary carbohydrate intake on the free testosterone: cortisol ratio responses to short-term intensive exercise training.&quot;

84 – &quot;Dietary Carbohydrate and Protein Manipulation and Exercise Recovery in Novice Weight-Lifters&quot;

85 – &quot;Effect of Glycogen Availability on Human Skeletal Muscle Protein Turnover during Exercise and Recovery&quot;


1 point

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18th Oct 2015

CUTTING 101


  • Nutrition

>CUTTING 101: HOW TO EAT FOR MAXIMUM FAT LOSS


  • io

>HOW OFTEN YOU SHOULD DO CARDIO

>In terms of frequency, here’s how I do it:

>* When I’m bulking, I do two 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>* When I’m cutting, I do three to five 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>* When I’m maintaining, I do two to three 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>I never do more than five cardio sessions per week, as I’ve found my strength begins to drop off in the gym if I do.


  • Weight Training

>DOES ANYTHING CHANGE WHEN CUTTING?

>One of many terrible pieces of training advice I hear among the “bros” is to train with light weights and high reps when cutting to “bring out the cuts.”

>This is 100 percent wrong.

>Focusing exclusively on high-rep training doesn’t help burn more fat than heavier weights. It doesn’t “shred you up,” nor does it make you vascular.

>Ironically, training heavy is especially important when you’re cutting because the name of the game is muscle preservation, and you need to keep overloading the muscles to accomplish this.

>So train hard when you’re cutting and keep trying to go up in strength. Most guys experience an initial drop in strength when they switch from a bulk to a cut, but I’ve always managed to build my strength back up and end more or less where I began with little to no muscle loss (if I do lose any muscle when I cut, I can’t see it in the mirror).

Matthews, Michael (2014-01-05). Bigger Leaner Stronger: The Simple Science of Building the Ultimate Male Body (The Build Muscle, Get Lean, and Stay Healthy Series Book 1) (p. 161). Oculus Publishers, Inc.. Kindle Edition.

1 point

·

7th Sep 2015

Great to hear how good you’re doing, I’m very appreciative of all of the great info on RedPill as well. I first heard about RP about a month or so ago and have been reading it for several hours many days.

>I have changed my diet, right now I am doing all low carb stuff and drinking protein shakes at both morning time and right after I work out.

In regard to carbs, I recommend checking out the book Bigger, Leaner, Stronger, for a quick synopsis you can check out this article at the author’s page. You may already be familiar with this, but I’ve been researching nutrition for several years now and I never realized this. There’s more to it than this, but one of the main things about low carb diets is they reduce the amount of glycogen stored in our liver and muscles which means less readily available energy for work outs. The important thing when it comes to carbs is to avoid processed carbs and foods high on the Glycemic Index because they digest much faster or whatnot- things like rice, white potatoes, sugar, flour.

“Many low-carb gurus will claim that you can lose weight much quicker if you consume very few carbs every day. Some people even believe they can only lose weight if they cut their carbs to nil.

The problem with these advices and beliefs is they fly in the face of both basic physiology and scientific findings, and mask the most common weight loss roadblock: eating too much, and moving too little.

A simple review of scientific literature shows that diet composition has no effect on long-term weight loss.

For example, let’s first look at a study conducted by the University of Pennsylvania. Researchers assigned 63 obese adults to either a low-carbohydrate, high-protein, high fat diet (20 grams of carbohydrate per day, gradually increased until target weight was achieved), or a conventional diet of 60% of calories from carbohydrate, 25% from fat, and 15% from protein.

The result: the low-carbohydrate group lost more weight in the first 3 months, but the difference at 12 months wasn’t significant.

The 3-month result isn’t surprising, considering the fact that reducing carbohydrate intake decreases the amount of glycogen we store in our liver and muscles, which in turn decreases total body water retention. This, of course, causes a rapid drop in weight that has nothing to do with burning fat (and anyone that has reduced carbohydrate intake as a means of cutting calories for weight loss has experienced this).

http://www.amazon.com/Bigger-Leaner-Stronger-Building-Ultimate/dp/1938895274/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&amp;qid=&amp;sr=

1 point

·

2nd May 2015

Read This Article -&gt; Cutting 101: How To Eat For Maximum Fat Loss


Other excerpts on the subject


>HOW OFTEN YOU SHOULD DO CARDIO

>In terms of frequency, here’s how I do it:

>* When I’m bulking, I do two 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>* When I’m cutting, I do three to five 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>* When I’m maintaining, I do two to three 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>* I never do more than five cardio sessions per week, as I’ve found my strength begins to drop off in the gym if I do.


>DOES ANYTHING CHANGE WHEN CUTTING?

>One of many terrible pieces of training advice I hear among the “bros” is to train with light weights and high reps when cutting to “bring out the cuts.”

>This is 100 percent wrong.

>Focusing exclusively on high-rep training doesn’t help burn more fat than heavier weights. It doesn’t “shred you up,” nor does it make you vascular.

>Ironically, training heavy is especially important when you’re cutting because the name of the game is muscle preservation, and you need to keep overloading the muscles to accomplish this.

>So train hard when you’re cutting and keep trying to go up in strength. Most guys experience an initial drop in strength when they switch from a bulk to a cut, but I’ve always managed to build my strength back up and end more or less where I began with little to no muscle loss (if I do lose any muscle when I cut, I can’t see it in the mirror).

Matthews, Michael (2014-01-05). Bigger Leaner Stronger: The Simple Science of Building the Ultimate Male Body (The Build Muscle, Get Lean, and Stay Healthy Series Book 1) (p. 161). Oculus Publishers, Inc.. Kindle Edition.

1 point

·

7th May 2015

>The Best Time To Do io

>When you do your cardio in relation to your weightlifting matters.

>Researchers from RMIT University worked with well-trained athletes in 2009 and found that “combining resistance exercise and cardio in the same session may disrupt genes for anabolism.” In laymen’s terms, they found that combining endurance and resistance training sends “mixed signals” to the muscles. io before the resistance training suppressed anabolic hormones such as IGF-1 and MGF, and cardio after resistance training increased muscle tissue breakdown.

>Several other studies, such as those conducted by researchers from the Children’s National Medical Center, the Waikato Institute of Technology, and the University of Jyvaskyla in Finland, came to the same conclusions: training for both endurance and strength simultaneously impairs your gains on both fronts. Training purely for strength or purely for endurance in a workout is far superior.

>io before weightlifting also saps your energy and makes it much harder to train heavy, which in turn inhibits your muscle growth.

>Therefore, I recommend that you separate your weightlifting and cardio sessions by at least a few hours if at all possible. Personally, I lift early in the morning and do my cardio after work, before dinner.

>If there’s no way that you can split up your cardio and weightlifting, do your weight training first, as cardio first will drain energy that you’ll want for your lifting. While this arrangement isn’t ideal, it’s not a huge problem. You can still do well on the program.

>If you can, I recommend having a protein shake after your weightlifting and before your cardio as this will help mitigate the muscle breakdown.

>How Often You Should Do io?

>In terms of frequency, here’s how I do it:

>* When I’m bulking, I do two 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>* When I’m cutting, I do three to five 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>* When I’m maintaining, I do two to three 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>* I never do more than five cardio sessions per week, as I’ve found my strength begins to drop off in the gym if I do.

>Many people are shocked to learn that I do no more than 1.5 to 2 hours of cardio per week while cutting but am able to get to the 6 to 7 percent body fat range with ease. Well, the idea that you have to do a ton of cardio to get shredded is a complete myth. It’s not only unnecessary but unhealthy as well.

>You don’t have to do cardio to lose fat, but if you want to get down to the 10 percent range or below, I can pretty much guarantee you’ll have to do at least two to three sessions per week.

>If you’d like to stick with steady-state cardio or include it in your routine, stick with the frequency recommendations given above. You can mix and match modalities (HIIT vs low-intensity steady-state, or LISS) but I still wouldn’t do more than five sessions per week.

Matthews, Michael (2014-01-05). Bigger Leaner Stronger: The Simple Science of Building the Ultimate Male Body (The Build Muscle, Get Lean, and Stay Healthy Series Book 1) (pp. 161-162). Oculus Publishers, Inc.. Kindle Edition.

1 point

·

27th Apr 2015

Read This Article 1st -&gt; Cutting 101: How To Eat For Maximum Fat Loss


That article will tell you how to eat, these excerpts address your training


>HOW OFTEN YOU SHOULD DO CARDIO

>In terms of frequency, here’s how I do it:

>* When I’m bulking, I do two 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>* When I’m cutting, I do three to five 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>* When I’m maintaining, I do two to three 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>* I never do more than five cardio sessions per week, as I’ve found my strength begins to drop off in the gym if I do.


>DOES ANYTHING CHANGE WHEN CUTTING?

>One of many terrible pieces of training advice I hear among the “bros” is to train with light weights and high reps when cutting to “bring out the cuts.”

>This is 100 percent wrong.

>Focusing exclusively on high-rep training doesn’t help burn more fat than heavier weights. It doesn’t “shred you up,” nor does it make you vascular.

>Ironically, training heavy is especially important when you’re cutting because the name of the game is muscle preservation, and you need to keep overloading the muscles to accomplish this.

>So train hard when you’re cutting and keep trying to go up in strength. Most guys experience an initial drop in strength when they switch from a bulk to a cut, but I’ve always managed to build my strength back up and end more or less where I began with little to no muscle loss (if I do lose any muscle when I cut, I can’t see it in the mirror).

Matthews, Michael (2014-01-05). Bigger Leaner Stronger: The Simple Science of Building the Ultimate Male Body (The Build Muscle, Get Lean, and Stay Healthy Series Book 1) (p. 161). Oculus Publishers, Inc.. Kindle Edition.

1 point

·

22nd Apr 2015

Cutting 101: How To Eat For Maximum Fat Loss


>HOW OFTEN YOU SHOULD DO CARDIO

>In terms of frequency, here’s how I do it:

>* When I’m bulking, I do two 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>* When I’m cutting, I do three to five 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>* When I’m maintaining, I do two to three 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>* I never do more than five cardio sessions per week, as I’ve found my strength begins to drop off in the gym if I do.


>DOES ANYTHING CHANGE WHEN CUTTING?

>One of many terrible pieces of training advice I hear among the “bros” is to train with light weights and high reps when cutting to “bring out the cuts.”

>This is 100 percent wrong.

>Focusing exclusively on high-rep training doesn’t help burn more fat than heavier weights. It doesn’t “shred you up,” nor does it make you vascular.

>Ironically, training heavy is especially important when you’re cutting because the name of the game is muscle preservation, and you need to keep overloading the muscles to accomplish this.

>So train hard when you’re cutting and keep trying to go up in strength. Most guys experience an initial drop in strength when they switch from a bulk to a cut, but I’ve always managed to build my strength back up and end more or less where I began with little to no muscle loss (if I do lose any muscle when I cut, I can’t see it in the mirror).

Matthews, Michael (2014-01-05). Bigger Leaner Stronger: The Simple Science of Building the Ultimate Male Body (The Build Muscle, Get Lean, and Stay Healthy Series Book 1) (p. 161). Oculus Publishers, Inc.. Kindle Edition.

1 point

·

24th Apr 2015

Read This Article for Nutrition Advice -&gt; Cutting 101: How To Eat For Maximum Fat Loss


Add cardio


>HOW OFTEN YOU SHOULD DO CARDIO

>In terms of frequency, here’s how I do it:

>* When I’m bulking, I do two 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>* When I’m cutting, I do three to five 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>* When I’m maintaining, I do two to three 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>* I never do more than five cardio sessions per week, as I’ve found my strength begins to drop off in the gym if I do.


Regarding Weight Training


>DOES ANYTHING CHANGE WHEN CUTTING?

>One of many terrible pieces of training advice I hear among the “bros” is to train with light weights and high reps when cutting to “bring out the cuts.”

>This is 100 percent wrong.

>Focusing exclusively on high-rep training doesn’t help burn more fat than heavier weights. It doesn’t “shred you up,” nor does it make you vascular.

>Ironically, training heavy is especially important when you’re cutting because the name of the game is muscle preservation, and you need to keep overloading the muscles to accomplish this.

>So train hard when you’re cutting and keep trying to go up in strength. Most guys experience an initial drop in strength when they switch from a bulk to a cut, but I’ve always managed to build my strength back up and end more or less where I began with little to no muscle loss (if I do lose any muscle when I cut, I can’t see it in the mirror).

Matthews, Michael (2014-01-05). Bigger Leaner Stronger: The Simple Science of Building the Ultimate Male Body (The Build Muscle, Get Lean, and Stay Healthy Series Book 1) (p. 161). Oculus Publishers, Inc.. Kindle Edition.

1 point

·

24th Apr 2015

HIIT can accomplish more in a lot less time…see below

>Sprinting’s benefits extend beyond the calories burned while exercising, though. A study conducted by scientists at the University of Western Ontario gives us insight into just how much more effective high-intensity cardio is. Researchers had 10 men and 10 women train three times per week, with one group doing between four and six 30-second treadmill sprints (with four minutes of rest in between each), and the other group doing 30 to 60 minutes of steady-state cardio (running on the treadmill at the “magical fat-loss zone” of 65 percent VO2 max).

>The results: after six weeks of training, the subjects doing the intervals had lost significantly more body fat. Yes, four to six 30-second sprints burn more fat than 60 minutes of incline treadmill walking.

>These findings are supported by several other studies, such as those conducted by researchers at Laval University, East Tennessee State University, Baylor College of Medicine, and the University of New South Wales, which have all shown that shorter, high-intensity cardio sessions result in greater fat loss over time than longer, low-intensity sessions.

>Although the exact mechanisms of how high-intensity cardio trumps steady-state cardio for fat-loss purposes aren’t fully understood yet, scientists have isolated quite a few of the factors, which include the following:

>* increased resting metabolic rate for more than 24 hours after exercise,

>* improved insulin sensitivity in the muscles,

>* higher levels of fat oxidation in the muscles,

>* significant spikes in growth hormone levels (which aid in fat loss) and catecholamine levels (chemicals your body produces to directly induce fat mobilization), and

>* post-exercise appetite suppression.

>High-intensity interval training not only burns more fat in less time than steady-state cardio, but it also preserves muscular size and improves performance as well.

>Research has shown that the longer your cardio sessions are, the more they impair strength and hypertrophy. Thus, keeping your cardio sessions short is important when we’re talking about maximizing your gains in the weight room and preserving your muscle. Only high-intensity interval training allows you to do this and burn enough fat to make it worthwhile.

Matthews, Michael (2014-01-05). Bigger Leaner Stronger: The Simple Science of Building the Ultimate Male Body (The Build Muscle, Get Lean, and Stay Healthy Series Book 1) (p. 160). Oculus Publishers, Inc.. Kindle Edition.

1 point

·

22nd Apr 2015

>Evolution has taught the body that having fat means being able to survive the times when food is scarce. Many thousands of years ago, when our ancestors were roaming the wilderness, they often journeyed for days without food, and their fat stores were all that kept them alive.

>Starving, they would finally kill an animal and feast, and their bodies knew to prepare for the next bout of starvation by storing excess energy as fat, as it was literally a matter of life and death.

>This genetic programming is still in us. When you restrict your calories for fat-loss purposes, your body reduces its total fat stores to stay alive, but it also slows down its basal metabolic rate to conserve energy. 1

>If you restrict your calories too severely or for too long, this metabolic downregulation, or “metabolic adaptation,” as it’s often called, can become quite severe, and the basal metabolic rate can plunge to surprisingly low levels. 2

>This mechanism is why “calorie counting” seems to not work for some people. It has nothing to do with hormone problems or eating too many carbs or anything other than the fact that the energy out part of the equation is impaired. Their bodies aren’t burning nearly as much energy as they should be.

>This is only the beginning of the problems with the “crash” approach to dieting, however, that has you enduring severe calorie deficits for extended periods:

>* You lose a lot of muscle, which not only leads to the dreaded “skinny fat” look, but it also impairs bone health and increases the overall risk of disease. 3

>* Your testosterone levels plummet and cortisol levels skyrocket, which not only makes you feel horrible but also accelerates muscle loss. 4

>* Your energy levels take a nosedive, you struggle with intense food cravings every day, and you become mentally clouded and even depressed. 5

>Fortunately, you can fix the metabolic adaptation and all the other negative effects of low-calorie dieting by slowly increasing food intake over time and thus bringing your basal metabolic rate back to a healthy level.

>But the real goal is to prevent it altogether…

Matthews, Michael (2014-01-05). Bigger Leaner Stronger: The Simple Science of Building the Ultimate Male Body (The Build Muscle, Get Lean, and Stay Healthy Series Book 1) (p. 40). Oculus Publishers, Inc.. Kindle Edition.

1 point

·

23rd Apr 2015

High-intensity interval training


>Sprinting’s benefits extend beyond the calories burned while exercising, though. A study conducted by scientists at the University of Western Ontario gives us insight into just how much more effective high-intensity cardio is. Researchers had 10 men and 10 women train three times per week, with one group doing between four and six 30-second treadmill sprints (with four minutes of rest in between each), and the other group doing 30 to 60 minutes of steady-state cardio (running on the treadmill at the “magical fat-loss zone” of 65 percent VO2 max).

>The results: after six weeks of training, the subjects doing the intervals had lost significantly more body fat. Yes, four to six 30-second sprints burn more fat than 60 minutes of incline treadmill walking.

>These findings are supported by several other studies, such as those conducted by researchers at Laval University, East Tennessee State University, Baylor College of Medicine, and the University of New South Wales, which have all shown that shorter, high-intensity cardio sessions result in greater fat loss over time than longer, low-intensity sessions.

>Although the exact mechanisms of how high-intensity cardio trumps steady-state cardio for fat-loss purposes aren’t fully understood yet, scientists have isolated quite a few of the factors, which include the following:

>* increased resting metabolic rate for more than 24 hours after exercise,

>* improved insulin sensitivity in the muscles,

>* higher levels of fat oxidation in the muscles,

>* significant spikes in growth hormone levels (which aid in fat loss) and catecholamine levels (chemicals your body produces to directly induce fat mobilization), and

>* post-exercise appetite suppression.

>High-intensity interval training not only burns more fat in less time than steady-state cardio, but it also preserves muscular size and improves performance as well.

>Research has shown that the longer your cardio sessions are, the more they impair strength and hypertrophy. Thus, keeping your cardio sessions short is important when we’re talking about maximizing your gains in the weight room and preserving your muscle. Only high-intensity interval training allows you to do this and burn enough fat to make it worthwhile.

Matthews, Michael (2014-01-05). Bigger Leaner Stronger: The Simple Science of Building the Ultimate Male Body (The Build Muscle, Get Lean, and Stay Healthy Series Book 1) (p. 160). Oculus Publishers, Inc.. Kindle Edition.

1 point

·

24th Apr 2015

>The Best Time To Do io

>When you do your cardio in relation to your weightlifting matters.

>Researchers from RMIT University worked with well-trained athletes in 2009 and found that “combining resistance exercise and cardio in the same session may disrupt genes for anabolism.” In laymen’s terms, they found that combining endurance and resistance training sends “mixed signals” to the muscles. io before the resistance training suppressed anabolic hormones such as IGF-1 and MGF, and cardio after resistance training increased muscle tissue breakdown.

>Several other studies, such as those conducted by researchers from the Children’s National Medical Center, the Waikato Institute of Technology, and the University of Jyvaskyla in Finland, came to the same conclusions: training for both endurance and strength simultaneously impairs your gains on both fronts. Training purely for strength or purely for endurance in a workout is far superior.

>io before weightlifting also saps your energy and makes it much harder to train heavy, which in turn inhibits your muscle growth.

>Therefore, I recommend that you separate your weightlifting and cardio sessions by at least a few hours if at all possible. Personally, I lift early in the morning and do my cardio after work, before dinner.

>If there’s no way that you can split up your cardio and weightlifting, do your weight training first, as cardio first will drain energy that you’ll want for your lifting. While this arrangement isn’t ideal, it’s not a huge problem. You can still do well on the program.

>If you can, I recommend having a protein shake after your weightlifting and before your cardio as this will help mitigate the muscle breakdown.

>How Often You Should Do io?

>In terms of frequency, here’s how I do it:

>* When I’m bulking, I do two 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>* When I’m cutting, I do three to five 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>* When I’m maintaining, I do two to three 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>* I never do more than five cardio sessions per week, as I’ve found my strength begins to drop off in the gym if I do.

>Many people are shocked to learn that I do no more than 1.5 to 2 hours of cardio per week while cutting but am able to get to the 6 to 7 percent body fat range with ease. Well, the idea that you have to do a ton of cardio to get shredded is a complete myth. It’s not only unnecessary but unhealthy as well.

>You don’t have to do cardio to lose fat, but if you want to get down to the 10 percent range or below, I can pretty much guarantee you’ll have to do at least two to three sessions per week.

>If you’d like to stick with steady-state cardio or include it in your routine, stick with the frequency recommendations given above. You can mix and match modalities (HIIT vs low-intensity steady-state, or LISS) but I still wouldn’t do more than five sessions per week.

Matthews, Michael (2014-01-05). Bigger Leaner Stronger: The Simple Science of Building the Ultimate Male Body (The Build Muscle, Get Lean, and Stay Healthy Series Book 1) (pp. 161-162). Oculus Publishers, Inc.. Kindle Edition.

1 point

·

25th Apr 2015

Read This Article -&gt; Cutting 101: How To Eat For Maximum Fat Loss


>HOW OFTEN YOU SHOULD DO CARDIO

>In terms of frequency, here’s how I do it:

>* When I’m bulking, I do two 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>* When I’m cutting, I do three to five 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>* When I’m maintaining, I do two to three 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>* I never do more than five cardio sessions per week, as I’ve found my strength begins to drop off in the gym if I do.


>DOES ANYTHING CHANGE WHEN CUTTING?

>One of many terrible pieces of training advice I hear among the “bros” is to train with light weights and high reps when cutting to “bring out the cuts.”

>This is 100 percent wrong.

>Focusing exclusively on high-rep training doesn’t help burn more fat than heavier weights. It doesn’t “shred you up,” nor does it make you vascular.

>Ironically, training heavy is especially important when you’re cutting because the name of the game is muscle preservation, and you need to keep overloading the muscles to accomplish this.

>So train hard when you’re cutting and keep trying to go up in strength. Most guys experience an initial drop in strength when they switch from a bulk to a cut, but I’ve always managed to build my strength back up and end more or less where I began with little to no muscle loss (if I do lose any muscle when I cut, I can’t see it in the mirror).

Matthews, Michael (2014-01-05). Bigger Leaner Stronger: The Simple Science of Building the Ultimate Male Body (The Build Muscle, Get Lean, and Stay Healthy Series Book 1) (p. 161). Oculus Publishers, Inc.. Kindle Edition.

1 point

·

30th Apr 2015

This excerpt tells you how to eat &amp; judge your progress -&gt; Cutting 101: How To Eat For Maximum Fat Loss


Also, observe the training principles below


>HOW OFTEN YOU SHOULD DO CARDIO

>In terms of frequency, here’s how I do it:

>* When I’m bulking, I do two 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>* When I’m cutting, I do three to five 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>* When I’m maintaining, I do two to three 25-minute HIIT sessions per week.

>* I never do more than five cardio sessions per week, as I’ve found my strength begins to drop off in the gym if I do.


>DOES ANYTHING CHANGE WHEN CUTTING?

>One of many terrible pieces of training advice I hear among the “bros” is to train with light weights and high reps when cutting to “bring out the cuts.”

>This is 100 percent wrong.

>Focusing exclusively on high-rep training doesn’t help burn more fat than heavier weights. It doesn’t “shred you up,” nor does it make you vascular.

>Ironically, training heavy is especially important when you’re cutting because the name of the game is muscle preservation, and you need to keep overloading the muscles to accomplish this.

>So train hard when you’re cutting and keep trying to go up in strength. Most guys experience an initial drop in strength when they switch from a bulk to a cut, but I’ve always managed to build my strength back up and end more or less where I began with little to no muscle loss (if I do lose any muscle when I cut, I can’t see it in the mirror).

Matthews, Michael (2014-01-05). Bigger Leaner Stronger: The Simple Science of Building the Ultimate Male Body (The Build Muscle, Get Lean, and Stay Healthy Series Book 1) (p. 161). Oculus Publishers, Inc.. Kindle Edition.

1 point

·

24th Apr 2015

>Sprinting’s benefits extend beyond the calories burned while exercising, though. A study conducted by scientists at the University of Western Ontario gives us insight into just how much more effective high-intensity cardio is. Researchers had 10 men and 10 women train three times per week, with one group doing between four and six 30-second treadmill sprints (with four minutes of rest in between each), and the other group doing 30 to 60 minutes of steady-state cardio (running on the treadmill at the “magical fat-loss zone” of 65 percent VO2 max).

>The results: after six weeks of training, the subjects doing the intervals had lost significantly more body fat. Yes, four to six 30-second sprints burn more fat than 60 minutes of incline treadmill walking.

>These findings are supported by several other studies, such as those conducted by researchers at Laval University, East Tennessee State University, Baylor College of Medicine, and the University of New South Wales, which have all shown that shorter, high-intensity cardio sessions result in greater fat loss over time than longer, low-intensity sessions.

>Although the exact mechanisms of how high-intensity cardio trumps steady-state cardio for fat-loss purposes aren’t fully understood yet, scientists have isolated quite a few of the factors, which include the following:

>* increased resting metabolic rate for more than 24 hours after exercise,

>* improved insulin sensitivity in the muscles,

>* higher levels of fat oxidation in the muscles,

>* significant spikes in growth hormone levels (which aid in fat loss) and catecholamine levels (chemicals your body produces to directly induce fat mobilization), and

>* post-exercise appetite suppression.

>High-intensity interval training not only burns more fat in less time than steady-state cardio, but it also preserves muscular size and improves performance as well.

>Research has shown that the longer your cardio sessions are, the more they impair strength and hypertrophy. Thus, keeping your cardio sessions short is important when we’re talking about maximizing your gains in the weight room and preserving your muscle. Only high-intensity interval training allows you to do this and burn enough fat to make it worthwhile.

Matthews, Michael (2014-01-05). Bigger Leaner Stronger: The Simple Science of Building the Ultimate Male Body (The Build Muscle, Get Lean, and Stay Healthy Series Book 1) (p. 160). Oculus Publishers, Inc.. Kindle Edition.

0 points

·

22nd Mar 2016

He wrote an excellent book called “Leaner, Bigger, Stronger.” You can find it in most book stores, but here it is on amazon.http://www.amazon.com/Bigger-Leaner-Stronger-Building-Ultimate/dp/1938895274/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1458673622&amp;sr=8-3&amp;keywords=michael+Matthews

It’s also available in ebook stores.

0 points

·

25th May 2015

Walking < Steady state cardio (running) < HIIT cardio (sprint intervals)

>Sprinting’s benefits extend beyond the calories burned while exercising, though. A study conducted by scientists at the University of Western Ontario gives us insight into just how much more effective high-intensity cardio is. Researchers had 10 men and 10 women train three times per week, with one group doing between four and six 30-second treadmill sprints (with four minutes of rest in between each), and the other group doing 30 to 60 minutes of steady-state cardio (running on the treadmill at the “magical fat-loss zone” of 65 percent VO2 max).

>The results: after six weeks of training, the subjects doing the intervals had lost significantly more body fat. Yes, four to six 30-second sprints burn more fat than 60 minutes of incline treadmill walking.

>These findings are supported by several other studies, such as those conducted by researchers at Laval University, East Tennessee State University, Baylor College of Medicine, and the University of New South Wales, which have all shown that shorter, high-intensity cardio sessions result in greater fat loss over time than longer, low-intensity sessions.

>Although the exact mechanisms of how high-intensity cardio trumps steady-state cardio for fat-loss purposes aren’t fully understood yet, scientists have isolated quite a few of the factors, which include the following:

>* increased resting metabolic rate for more than 24 hours after exercise,

>* improved insulin sensitivity in the muscles,

>* higher levels of fat oxidation in the muscles,

>* significant spikes in growth hormone levels (which aid in fat loss) and catecholamine levels (chemicals your body produces to directly induce fat mobilization), and

>* post-exercise appetite suppression.

>High-intensity interval training not only burns more fat in less time than steady-state cardio, but it also preserves muscular size and improves performance as well.

>Research has shown that the longer your cardio sessions are, the more they impair strength and hypertrophy. Thus, keeping your cardio sessions short is important when we’re talking about maximizing your gains in the weight room and preserving your muscle. Only high-intensity interval training allows you to do this and burn enough fat to make it worthwhile.

Matthews, Michael (2014-01-05). Bigger Leaner Stronger: The Simple Science of Building the Ultimate Male Body (The Build Muscle, Get Lean, and Stay Healthy Series Book 1) (p. 160). Oculus Publishers, Inc.. Kindle Edition.